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Showing posts with label MotorCycles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label MotorCycles. Show all posts

Saturday, March 7, 2020

The vintage-styled Moto Major 350 still enchanting until today

By the end of World War II, many manufacturers returned to their natural habitat from producing military to civilian needs. This is marked by a number of companies starting to emerge, offering everything that can be produced by the changed 'defense industry' to those who survived an obscure time safely.
The vintage-styled 1947 Moto Major 350 prototype still enchanting until today. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3ciB01d)
Almost all of the companies that we know today were coming from that era, but do you know how many of these companies did not survive? But there are some very interesting copies from the era, such as a 350 cc motorcycle called the Moto Major 350 which appears quite unique even with vintage postwar motorcycle technology.
The 1947 Moto Major 350 is voted as the Best of Show Motorcycles at the Concorso Eleganza Villa d’Este in 2018. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/39irZUh)
The motorcycle is known to have been designed by a Turin engineer named Salvatore Maiorca in 1947 and it can be juxtaposed with two other vintage motorbikes that came from the same era and also have an almost similar shape such as the 1938 Killinger & Freund and Louis Lucien Lepoix’s personal BMW R12, made in 1947.

As quoted from The Vintagent, this motorcycle was a product of its time, Moto Major originated as an extraordinary styling arrangement at Aeritalia's aerodynamic research facility in Turin. This is possible because the process of developing a motorcycle is fully funded by Aeritalia, a Turin-based subsidiary of Fiat.
From every angle, the Moto Major is stunning and compelling. The sole prototype remains in original and unrestored condition. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/39irZUh)
Initially, the motorcycle development was mentioned as an exploratory effort of the Italian automotive giant to produce two-wheeled vehicles. This is the Fiat's second attempt after the company was known in 1938 had ever made a scooter prototype similar to the Piaggio-made prototype in 1945 named the MP5 Paperino.

Amazingly, even though it has passed 7 decades since this motorcycle was first presented, the aesthetics are still enchanting. By applying aerodynamic bodywork construction that is reminiscent of cephalopods. With the bodywork sculpted that is full of extraordinary detail, such as the silencer shaped resembled a fishtail laid.
A cutaway view of the 350 single-cylinder Moto Major, showing the steering system, inline single-cylinder motor, shaft drive, and fuel tank under the saddle. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/39irZUh)
The motorbike appeared with an exotic art deco styled bodywork that can run using a twin-cylinder engine that is cooled with liquid, vertical, with two radiators embedded in the fairing that is fed through the front air in front. It was a little backward because the hand shift appeared through the bodywork, and handlebars exposed.

The twin exhausts exited through twin flattened fishtails out back, which the 350cc single model retained, in spite of having only one exhaust pipe! The second fishtail is a dummy, just for an aesthetic balance purposed.
The Moto Major has twin fishtail exhausts hide a secret with only one side is functional, another one is a dummy for aesthetic balance purposes only. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/39irZUh)
Then the entire body is covered with steel sheets that leave only the wheels, headlight and protruding handlebars. Thus maintaining an absolute purity line, running from the headlight up to the rear wheel hub, while the front shell curls gently and smartly to surround the front wheels, then re-ignites to protect the rider.

The sublime bodywork is also designed as a self-supporting hull, and fully monocoque. It is free to hug the front and rear wheels closely because the suspension is not between the wheels and the chassis, but between the wheel rims and their hubs! Maiorca used the idea of suspension-in-wheel in his aircraft designs, reinventing an idea almost as old as the motorcycle ie the elastic wheel.
The handlebars move in a slot in the bodywork, between the speedometer and a steering damper knob. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/39irZUh)
In the blissful optimism of the post-war period, the brass at FIAT seemed to forget the costs of building such a radical machine. While Moto Major remains unique, so they plan to market it and then collaborated with Pirelli to build the factory. After then Pirelli happily showed the Moto Major 350 at its booth at the Salon of Milan in 1948, where it created an enduring sensation for good.
The Moto Major’s in-wheel suspension uses 12 compressed rubber disc per wheel for suspension, to provide a nominal 50cm of travel. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/39irZUh)
But for some undefinition reasons, in the end, all of these didn't go according to the plan. And finally, the dream of the Moto Major becomes too good to be true and is saved forever in memory. Maybe for them, this is a beautiful vehicle to see, but it also remains difficult to understand and not produced.

The Moto Major could run again, but its rubber buffers are unique and deteriorating, so the Hockenheim Museum Archive (the current owner) has chosen to keep it exactly as it is, for now. Here's the video of the Concorso Eleganza Villa d’Este in 2018, where the Moto Major voted as the Best of Show Motorcycles.
Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops.... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | THE VINTAGENT | BIKEEXIF | MOTORIDERSUNIVERSE]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Here's the 1st Italian-made scooter even it just a prototype

Over the years many automotive enthusiasts around the world have known that the worldwide culture of scooters was originally popularized by the two Italian companies, namely Piaggio and Innocenti in the 1940s and experienced the heyday of the 1950s and 1960s. This was marked by the number of scooter products that were present in the world automotive market at that time.
Many thought that the 1938 Fiat scooter prototype was the 1st Italian-made scooter, instead Vespa or Lambretta. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/39gwX3G)
But did you know? if the Vespa and Lambretta scooters were not the first Italian scooters, it turns out that among many Italian companies working in the pre and post-war automotive industry, one of them was Fiat. The company was known to have ever made a scooter prototype in 1938 that looked similar to Piaggio's MP5 Paperino.

Because the Fiat prototype was made in 1938, so many people called it the first Italian scooter, even though it was built only as a prototype. The existence of this scooter began with an idea from Giancarlo Camarena, vice president of the Fiat Group at the time. He must think hard and try to maintain the business in order to survive in difficult economic conditions at the time by making a new breakthrough.
Now, the one-off 1938 Fiat Scooter prototype is sat on display in the Salsapariglia private museum. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/38b1D58)
Yes, at that time the world was hit by a severe economic recession, so that people could no longer afford to buy a car, even with a small engine size coupled with none of the military equipment orders. So then Camarena came up with an idea to create a more affordable alternative vehicle.

Shortly after, the alternative vehicle construction process was started immediately. The Fiat scooter project was then entrusted to a Fiat engineer named Vittorio Calosso. Next to the prototype design, Fiat collaborates with Volugrafo, a Turin-based company. Shortly afterward in 1938 was born a scooter prototype based on the Volugrafo scooter design created by Vittorio Belmondo.
The 1938 Fiat scooter protorype is used a 98cc Sachs engine with a magnetic ignition system and is capable of producing power of 2 horsepower. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2TCIofF)
Physically, this prototype scooter looks beautiful with a chrome-plated grill under the rider's seat where at a glance its shape reminiscent to the Alfa Romeo shield. This scooter prototype has a fairly lightweight of around 55 kg with a front leaf spring suspension system and swinging arms so that it can be a valid vehicle for traveling around the city or for just recreational rides.
The 1938 Fiat Scooter prototype has a gear-shift lever similar to one that used on the car. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/38b1D58)
The unique figure of a small scooter uses a 98cc Sachs engine with a magnetic ignition system and is capable of producing power of 2 horsepower. The engine power generated is then channeled through a 2-speed manual transmission system to drive its rear wheel so that it can run up to a top speed of 70 kph. The gearbox is operated through a lever located on the handlebar, with its front suspension exposed, so it looks comfortable, futuristic, and modern at the time.

Unfortunately, the development of this scooter then stopped without ever being produced at all, because at that time the second world war shortly began in 1939. Currently, this unique specimen is seen in a completely restored condition and is stored as one of the collections of the Collezione Salsapariglia private museum.
Indeed very little is known about this scooter, both from books and magazines even from the internet though. Hopefully, this article can be one of the references related to Fiat's scooter prototype. Grazie signore!

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops.... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | DANATA VINTAGE | COLLEZIONE SALSAPARIGLIA | BOOK OF GOOGLE]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Lepoix's R12 futuristic bodywork designed far beyond its time

There are always creative people who could be used as inspirational models. No exception in the automotive world. Maybe the following figure is not many people who know him, because indeed he was not so prominent in his time. But over time, it is increasingly seen how extraordinary the work and achievements of this gentleman figure when viewed today.
Louis Lucien Lepoix and his spectacular motorcycle with futuristic bodywork for his BMW R12 made in 1947. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/38fgQSL)
Yes, he is Louis Lucien Lepoix, a French-born industrial designer, but mostly settled in Germany during his career. Noted, he had founded his-owned design atelier that was originally focused on two-wheeled projects in 1947.

The work began by creating an extraordinary futuristic bodywork for his BMW R12. The BMW R12 motorcycle is known to carry a 750cc flat-twin side-valve engine with a press "steel" frame.
The comparatively staid BMW R12 on which Lepoix placed his futuristic bodywork. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3coQi4A)
As quoted from Bikeexif, it was mentioned that even without the support of the manufacturer, in 1947 he designed and built an extraordinary streamlined motorcycle based on his BMW R12 motorcycle. It was said that he bought a 1934 BMW R12 motorcycle from an auction held by the French Military in Baden-Baden, Germany.
Louis Lucien Lepoix’s pre-War sketch for his modern motorcycle design. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/38fgQSL)
The result, a motorcycle that is very spectacular, but its weight is now a little heavier. At that time very few motorcycle models explored the full-streamlining concept and, more rarely, applied fairing which protected the rider from being blown by the wind. And after wearing a new bodywork that has an art-deco style, so it looks very stylish, modern and futuristic.
A sketch of the Lepoix's BMW R12 with a fully covered and faired (ie, bodywork protecting the rider with aerodynamic, wind-cheating designs). (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2THufOj)
Perhaps, this modified R12 motorbike was one of the first motorbikes to be fully covered and faired (ie, bodywork protecting the rider with aerodynamic, wind-cheating designs).

But shortly after building the motorcycle, he sold it because of financial problems and since then the motorcycle is not known to exist anymore.
Another view of the BMW special (note the BMW’s original brakes and fork shrouds are incorporated). (Picture from: http://bit.ly/32GqUCT)
Besides using the BMW motorbike mentioned above to build his name in the German motorcycle industry, there're many more motorcycles designed by Louis Lucien Lepoix in the 1950s such as Kreidler, Hercules, Horex, Puch, Maico, Triumph, Bastert and Walba and others.

And during his career in the automotive world, he produced a lot of phenomenal futuristic vehicle design works far beyond its time.
Rearview of the BMW special showing its sweeping, integrated lines, and the original pressed-steel frame of the BMW beneath. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/38fgQSL)
At the end of the Bikeexif article is wrote, that the son of Louis Lucien Lepoix seeks help from anybody to inform them if there's any whereabout info of this unique BMW R12. Due to there is not much information now about this BMW, or who the buyer was. And the video below is about the original BMW R12.
Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops.... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BIKEEXIF | THE VINTAGENT]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Sunday, March 1, 2020

A unique Switzerland-made Schmid motorcycle

If you are looking for a unique form of motorized vehicle that may not yet be widely known. Now, this is a classic motorbike with a unique appearance currently on display at the Hockenheim Ring Motor-Sport-Museum. The figure of a motorcycle that appears unpretentious (as it is) with a fairly unique shape.
1923 Schmid Motorcycle built by Carl Schmid while on display at the 2009 'Motorrad Ikonnen' - Book and Exhibition in Autostadt, Wolfsburg, Germany. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/32vlRFm)
This motorcycle then known as Schmid motorcycle was built in 1923 as a brainchild and works of an engineer from Geneva, Switzerland named Carl Schmid. It said he was built this motorcycle bodywork as a masterpiece for automotive carosserie internships, to prove his expertise in panel beating technique and aerodynamic design.
1923 Schmid Motorcycle built by Carl Schmid was driven by a 175cc-capacity OHV engine that is capable of blowing power of 3 horsepower. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3c5hZzg)
Visually, this motorcycle uses a monocoque construction and front fenders as a wheel suspension with a swing arm that has been integrated with the fenders, then the middle to the rear are all covered with a unique art deco-styled fairing without suspension on the rear wheels.
Rear view of 1923 Schmid Motorcycle built by Carl Schmid with half of the Wooler 'Flying Banana' in the background(Picture from: http://bit.ly/2HZKBMC)
It looks very heavy with steel panels, as its visual weight. And it was driven by a 175cc-capacity OHV engine that is capable of spewing power of 3 horsepower, so that can make this unique motorcycle capable of running up to a top speed of 70 kph. And makes the Wooler 'Flying Banana' in the background look unspecial too!

Uniquely, this classic motorcycle has applied a hydraulic brake system, starter, and coupled with the use of a four-cylinder in-line engine. So that makes it a complete picture of a simple monocoque construction system from a full fairing motorcycle that was coming from the 1920s.
That makes us very impressed with those (classic motorcycle designers) who are often far ahead of their time even though economically the designers and manufacturers can be said to not achieve success. But at least today they are considered a milestone in motorcycle technology through their remarkable motorbike workmanships. Unfortunately, it isn't known whether the motorcycle is still functioning properly after being a museum display item

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops.... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | WOLFSBURG CITY TOUR | BEST MOTORCYCLE]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Friday, February 28, 2020

Forgotten scooter of Royal Enfield

As we all know, the current invasion of scooter culture was initially popularized along with the successful development of scooters spearheaded by the two Italian companies, Piaggio and Innocenti a few decades ago. What about other companies, did they ever designed the phenomenal two-wheeled vehicle alongside with those Italian duo mentioned above.
1962 Royal Enfield Fabtabulus scooter made by Enfield India to gain a share of the growing scooter market in India at the time. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2HUfBO8)
Apparently, there is. One of which is a motorcycle manufacturer from England named Royal Enfield. As quoted from the My Royal Enfields site, that George Neal, an engineer who worked at the motorcycle company, had also ever designed the similar scooter-styled as that of Vespa and Lambretta in the early 1940s. 
1962 Royal Enfield Fabtabulus scooter was powered by a 175-cc, 2-stroke engine from Villiers and it churned out a maximum power of 7.5 bhp. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/32vEw44)
But the British company did not pursue the project more, if only the project continued, it would be the Royal Enfield's big coup for the supremacy of the Italian duo given the scooter craze of the 1950s. Newly in the next twenty years exactly in 1962, Royal Enfield through its Indian subsidiary (Enfield India) introduced a scooter model named Royal Enfield Fantabulus to gain a share of the growing scooter market in India at the time. 
1962 Royal Enfield Fabtabulus scooter was sold at the price of £175 in India, but it never became popular in the market at the time. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/32nfPGQ)
The Fantabulus name was claimed that it was short for fantastic performance, fabulous price. At that time the scooter body was made at Madras by Enfield India and its Villiers Mark 11E engine was produced in England. And the scooter sold at the price of £175 in India, but it never became popular in the market at the time.
The scooter was powered by a 175-cc, 2-stroke engine from Villiers and it churned out a maximum power of 7.5 bhp. It also featured an electric starter, which was an uncommon thing even in the motorbikes in those days. The scooter model manufactured from 1962 up to the 1970s.

And now this scooter has become a scarce item even in India and be one of the sought after items by many automotive collectors around the globe. So no wonder if the price has also become a fantastic and fabulous as its name.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops.... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | TIMES OF INDIA | MY ROYAL ENFIELDS]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Have You ever known these two unique Polish motorcycles?

There's a pleasant feeling when We surf in cyberspace then find a motorized vehicle that is unique and perhaps never been seen before by many people. This is what We felt when first saw two Polish classic motorcycles known as the MSS (Motocykl Stanisław Skura) 1 and MSS 500, so that's tempting Our curiosity to find out more about them both.
The first motorcycle built by Stanislaw Skura in 1949 named MSS 1. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/327R1CG)
Information about these two unique motorcycles turned out to be very little and difficult if there are some mostly written in Polish. So we think that these motorcycles existence were most likely to be little known by automotive enthusiasts outside of Poland, and now We've proudly presented the article about those unique-shaped motorcycles.

1. 1949 MSS 1
And from several references that we've found, it said that the MSS 1 was the first motorcycle built handmade by Stanisław Skura in 1949. It could happen due to he is worked at a military airbase, so he had access to equipment and aluminum materials at the airplane workshops. Then he makes this motorcycle, and most of the motorcycle parts are made by himself (We thought that the engine and gearbox).
1949 MSS 1 used a V2 OHV 4,500 ccm engine combined with a three-speed gearbox. (Picture from http://bit.ly/327R1CG)
This motorcycle has a pretty unique shape, this can be seen from both of front-rear wheels mentioned taken from the German military aircraft wheels, which are wrapped on 20-inches-size truck rims, then the carburetor is taken from the German tanks.
1949 MSS 1 has a pretty unique shape, this can be seen from both of front-rear wheels mentioned taken from the German military aircraft wheels and mounted on 20-inches-size truck rims(Picture from http://bit.ly/32cx4ut)
The motorcycle uses a V2 OHV engine with a capacity of around 4,500 ccm combined with a three-speed gearbox. And also mentioned this motorcycle is able to carry 8 passengers at once including the driver (3 on the motorcycle and 2 on the sidecar) and 3 other standing on the rear platform.
1949 MSS 1 is able to carry 8 passengers at once including the driver (3 on the motorcycle and 2 on the sidecar) and 3 other standing on the rear platform. (Picture from http://bit.ly/38LAUgH)
Although there is no detailed information about its performance when viewed from its capability to carry so much burden, and surely the engine must be able to burst enough power to support that capability.

Of course, he did not make all the engine components but based on some components that were generally available at the time, such as cylinders from generator sets, connecting rods, gears, magneto, headlight, carburetors, wheels, tires, bearings, etc.

But unfortunately, later the motorcycle had been confiscated and destroyed by the Polish military due to the allegations of the motorcycle constructed by using the considered items of their properties.

2. 1957 MSS 500
And from several references that we've found, it said that the MSS 500 motorbike was built handmade by Stanisław Skura in 1957. In general, this motorcycle looks to have a rounded and weird-bulging shape which is further strengthened by the use of a pair of large wheels. This motorcycle at a glance is similar to another unique motorcycle from Germany named Friedenstaube Motorrad that made in the 1930s. However both of them didn't have any relationship at all.
While this MSS 500 is built by Stanislaw Skura in 1957 and used a single-cylinder 500 ccm engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/327R1CG)
This motorbike was built by using the 2nd World War leftover items and almost all of its construction is made of aluminum, including the frame, the front with trapezoidal, rear swingarm with central shock absorbers and of course the fenders. 

Then for the MSS 500 motorcycle itself is mentioned using a single-cylinder engine with a capacity of 500 ccm, unfortunately, there is no information about its performance as well. Uniquely this first motorcycle was running by using a pair of car wheels that wrap around 16-inches-size rims.
It is now believed that the one-off MSS 500 motorcycle soon be the target of the world's automotive collectors, so it is very reasonable due to the rarity made its price is exorbitant.
And the still-existed MSS 500 motorcycle, lastly seen in public while on display in one of the classic motorcycle exhibitions held at the Topacz Castle in Kobierzyce near Wroclaw, Poland in 2012. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2HCYlwq)






Well, this will be open our minds because wherever always been born the inspirational figures who able to take advantage of situations and conditions around them to realize a creative idea into something useful. You could be that's if you have enough gut and will to make your dream come into reality.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops.... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | TROOPER 4X4 | IZHMOTO.PL]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone