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Showing posts with label Classic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Classic. Show all posts

Monday, February 19, 2024

Breaking Barriers: Ferrari's 4WD Evolution with the 408 Integrale

Study Design - In Ferrari's rich history, the dance with 4-wheel drive technology is a tale of exploration rather than a favored path. Mauro Forghieri, the revered engineer overseeing Scuderia's racing evolution, ventured into the 4wd concept for Formula 1. The test car, the 312B3 or 'snow plough,' emerged, integrating parts from other race cars, showcasing a distinctive appearance with an integrated front wing/spoiler.
The two Ferrari 408 Integrale prototypes, one in classic red (70183) and the other in vibrant canary yellow (78610), serve as a dynamic laboratory for groundbreaking 4WD sportscar technologies led by a visionary Mauro Forghieri. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
Inspired by the 1961 Ferguson P99 Climax, the 312B3 became the pioneer 4wd F1 car, signifying the end of an era for front-engine cars triumphing in F1 races. While the 312B3 never graced the tracks, it paved the way for triumphant T-series race cars, yet Ferrari refrained from further 4wd F1 ventures.
The Ferrari 408 Integrale prototype showcased advanced engineering with a steel central monocoque, aluminum sections, and composite body panels. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
Following his F1 departure, Mauro Forghieri assumed the directorial helm at Ferrari's "advanced research office," steering the company toward innovation. Under his guidance, the Maranello-based automaker unveiled the Ferrari 408 Integrale, a working concept car serving as a dynamic laboratory for groundbreaking technologies.
The Ferrari 408 Integrale prototype'a construction enlisted the Alcan showcasing their innovative use of bonded and stamped aluminum panels with structural adhesives. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
During 1987-1988, Maranello witnessed the birth of two all-wheel-drive 408 prototypes, featuring an 8-cylinder engine and a body designed by the I.DE.A Institute. The prototypes, one in traditional red (70183) and the other in canary yellow (78610), showcased advanced engineering with a steel central monocoque, aluminum sections, and composite body panels.
The Ferrari 408 Integrale prototype designed by the I.DE.A Institute, and crafted by by Carrozzeria Scaglietti directly in Maranello. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
The construction enlisted the expertise of Alcan, a Canadian aluminum specialists, showcasing their innovative use of bonded and stamped aluminum panels with structural adhesives. The Ferrari 408 Integrale's chassis, a fusion of stainless steel and aluminum, exemplified strength, stiffness, and lightness—an ideal combination. This groundbreaking approach hinted at the adoption of a similar aluminum chassis in the Ferrari 360, a dozen years later.
The Ferrari 408 Integrale prototype chassis, a fusion of stainless steel and aluminum, exemplified strength, stiffness, and lightness—an ideal combination. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
Crafted by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, the Ferrari 408 Integrale aka 408 RM4, might not win beauty contests, ranking high on the "ugly scale." Nevertheless, its advanced features, even by today's standards, include an aluminum frame with bonded sandwich panels, ensuring low drag with a Cd ranging from 0.274 to 0.314.
The Ferrari 408 Integrale boasted air conditioning and interior quality surpassing even the iconic F40. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
At its core, the 408 housed a centrally longitudinally mounted V8, showcasing compactness and lightness while adhering to production quality standards. The car boasted air conditioning and interior quality surpassing even the iconic F40. Engineers from Honda likely drew inspiration from the 408 when designing the Honda NSX, emphasizing the 408's influential role in shaping the supercar template.
The Ferrari 408 Integrale's interior showcased a lavish blend of red carpet and black cushioned leather, adorning its seats, dashboard, and door panels. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
The 408's pièce de résistance was its four-wheel-drive system, featuring mechanical limited-slip differentials, a central hydraulic limited-slip system, and manual override for complete lock. Despite its meticulous design, the 408 was deemed too advanced and exotic for its time and Ferrari's ethos. 
At its core, the Ferrari 408 Integrale housed a centrally longitudinally mounted V8, showcasing compactness and lightness while adhering to production quality standards. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
Ferrari's emphasis on the 408 Integrale's performance over aesthetics underscores its dedication to exploring 4-wheel-drive layout and 4-wheel-steering systems. While specific performance data remains elusive, the absence of a 4WD production model hints at potential challenges in realizing this groundbreaking concept.

The incorporation of four-wheel drive to elevate the performance of sports cars, supercars, or race cars isn't novel, even for Ferrari. Although the 408 prototypes marked Ferrari's closest approach to a production 4wd car, the concept was thoroughly investigated and studied. The legacy of the Ferrari 408 Integrale endures as a testament to the brand's relentless pursuit of innovation, leaving an indelible imprint on the automotive landscape.
Ferrari prioritizing the performance of the 408 Integrale over aesthetics highlights their commitment to advancing 4-wheel-drive and 4-wheel-steering systems. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
The 408 concept was meticulously designed and poised for production. However, its perceived avant-garde nature, supported by 12-15 patents, rendered it too exotic for its time and especially for Ferrari. Mauro Forghieri embarked on a subsequent chapter, joining the rejuvenated Bugatti under Romano Artioli, where he refined his ideas and contributed to the four-wheel-drive system of the equally advanced EB110. The latter featured a longitudinal offset V12 with the gearbox stacked on its side, echoing the innovative spirit of the 408.
Despite Ferrari's long-standing exploration of four-wheel drive for enhanced sports car performance, the Ferrari 408 Integrale prototypes represented their closest step to a production 4WD vehicle, undergoing comprehensive study. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
Mauro Forghieri's continued innovation journey with Bugatti's EB110 stands as a testament to the indomitable spirit of automotive exploration. Although Ferrari's 408 Integrale didn't materialize into a production model, it left an indelible mark on the landscape of automotive innovation. The echoes of its influence reverberate through time, underscoring the brand's commitment to pushing boundaries and embracing the uncharted. | z4vbIcH5mv0 |
In retrospection, the Ferrari 408 Integrale emerges not just as a concept car but as a bold proclamation of Ferrari's audacity to dream beyond convention. While its physical manifestation may have eluded production lines, its essence lives on, inspiring future endeavors and contributing to the ever-evolving narrative of automotive innovation. Only later in 2011, Ferrari had launched its first 4WD model, Ferrari FF, which is most likely the result of further development of the 408. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | WHICHCAR.COM.AU | SUPERCARNOSTALGIA | TOPGEAR | CARROZZIERI-ITALIANI | CARSTYLING.RU | FACEBOOK | WIKIPEDIA ]
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Sunday, February 18, 2024

Italian Elegance Redefined: The Story of Maserati's 330 Ricarrozata

2 in 1 - As the 1970s drew to a close, Maserati found itself at a crossroads, mirroring the uncertainties that marked the beginning of the decade. The Italian automaker was navigating the challenges of its recent acquisition by the De Tomaso motor company. Burdened by a staggering debt of 4 billion Lira (equivalent to US$20 million today), Maserati faced operational hurdles that seemed insurmountable.
The Maserati 330 Ricarrozata Berlinetta was a remarkable project emerged to commemorate Maserati's golden years in racing, and crafted by the Italian design firm ATL in 1979. (Picture from: YourSydneyMate)
Under the leadership of Alejandro De Tomaso, a relentless effort was made to purge any remnants of Citroën, the previous owner, from Maserati's identity. This overhaul included abandoning vehicles heavily reliant on French components and replacing Citroën parts with standard alternatives. Even a joint Citroën/Maserati V6 engine, previously developed and shelved, was entirely scrapped. In a bold move, engineers with any affiliations to the French company, including the longtime chief engineer Giulio Alfieri, were unceremoniously ousted on De Tomaso's inaugural day.
The Maserati 330 Ricarrozata Berlinetta painted in a distinctive racing green, the body paid homage to Maserati racers from the 1950s and 60s. (Picture from: YourSydneyMate)
De Tomaso's vision for Maserati aimed at transforming the brand's image from a high-end, high-performance luxury item to something more accessible to the average Italian. The goal was to create family-oriented vehicles, providing an opportunity for the common man to own a Maserati. Despite the challenges, De Tomaso's strategic decisions kept Maserati afloat and still producing vehicles, albeit in a different direction.
The Maserati 330 Ricarrozata Berlinetta boasted a full aluminum body, blending elements from two iconic racers: the Maserati A6GCS/53 and the Maserati 450S, resulting in a visually stunning sports coupe. (Picture from: YourSydneyMate)
Amidst the turmoil of this period, particularly in 1979, Maserati unveiled several aesthetically pleasing and unique models such as the Maserati Merak, Maserati Kyalami, Maserati Quattroporte, and the spotlight of our discussion, the Maserati 330 Ricarrozata Berlinetta.

In 1979, a remarkable project emerged to commemorate Maserati's golden years in racing—the Maserati 330 Ricarrozata Berlinetta. Crafted by the Italian design firm ATL, this special vehicle boasted a full aluminum body, blending elements from two iconic racers: the PininFarina-designed A6GCS/53 and the Zagato-made 450S, resulting in a visually stunning sports coupe.
The Maserati 330 Ricarrozata Berlinetta powered by a 4.2-liter dual overhead cam V8 engine borrowed from the Kyalami to generate 255 bhp at 6,000 rpm and 260 lb-ft of torque at 3,200 rpm. (Picture from: YourSydneyMate)
Powered by a 4.2-liter dual overhead cam V8 engine borrowed from the Kyalami, the two-seater coupe generated 255 bhp at 6,000 rpm and 260 lb-ft of torque at 3,200 rpm. A five-speed manual transmission completed the powertrain, delivering a thrilling rear-wheel-drive experience. Painted in a distinctive racing green, the body paid homage to Maserati racers from the 1950s and 60s.
While the 1970s presented numerous obstacles for Maserati, the tail end of the decade brought a semblance of stability, even as the brand's reputation suffered due to quality concerns. Despite this, Maserati's commitment to delivering impressive engine performance and driving experiences remained unwavering. As the tumultuous decade concluded, Maserati stood resilient, ready to face the challenges of the next era in its storied history. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | YOURSYDNEYMATE ]
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Friday, February 16, 2024

From Prototype to Oblivion: The Short-Lived Brilliance of FSO Syrena Sport

Unique ONES - Poland, not traditionally known for its automotive prowess, has a hidden gem in its history – the FSO Syrena Sport. FSO (Fabryka Samochodów Osobowych), operating in Warsaw from 1948 to 2011, played a pivotal role in introducing intriguing cars to the world. The Syrena Sport, born from the creative minds at FSO, stands out as an embodiment of Polish automotive ingenuity. Unfortunately, its fate took a tragic turn, leaving enthusiasts longing for what could have been.
FSO Syrena Sport weighed only 710 kg, thanks to its figreglass body. (Picture from: Nodum.org)
The roots of the Syrena Sport can be traced back to the original Syrena sedan, FSO's second-ever car. Introduced in 1957, the Syrena sedan quickly became a symbol of simplicity and reliability, capturing the hearts of many in Poland. With this success, FSO engineers were inspired to embark on a special project – a sports car prototype designed by Cezary Nawrot.
FSO Syrena Sport – the most beautiful Polish car was denied and then mindlessly destroyed. (Picture from: Autokult.pl)
Nawrot, driven by the desire to explore new solutions and production technologies, crafted a sports car prototype that transcended the typical expectations. Drawing inspiration from cars beyond the Iron Curtain, Nawrot incorporated details reminiscent of Ferrari models, Mercedes-Benz 190SL, and perhaps even the Chevrolet Corvette. The result was the uniquely beautiful FSO Syrena Sport, featuring a fiberglass body and a lightweight design, weighing only 710 kilograms.
One of the rare historic pictures of the original FSO Syrena Sport – other images are showing replicas. (Picture from: Nodum.org)
One notable aspect of Nawrot's design was the determination to avoid the standard 2-stroke 2-cylinder S-15 engine used in the Syrena sedan. To achieve this, he ingeniously lowered the bonnet, making it incompatible with the S15 engine. Instead, a brand-new air-cooled 0.7-liter 4-stroke flat-twin S16 engine, developed and inspired by Panhard Dyna Z, found its place in the Syrena Sport. Despite initial power output discrepancies, the car showcased impressive cornering abilities thanks to its independent rear suspension.
The FSO Syrena Sport made its grand debut on May 1st, 1960, earning international acclaim. (Picture from: Autokult.pl)
The FSO Syrena Sport made its grand debut on May 1st, 1960, earning international acclaim. The Italian newspaper "Il Giorno" hailed it as "the most beautiful car built behind the Iron Curtain." Despite being a prototype with no production plans, the public's demand for the Syrena Sport was fervent. However, the tale takes a twist reflective of the socio-political climate of the time.
Poland, existing behind the Iron Curtain as a communist country, did not embrace the bold and unconventional design of the Syrena Sport. The government, wary of a car that didn't align with the ideals of the working class, intervened, abruptly ending the program. With just 29,000 km on the clock, the lone Syrena Sport was consigned to storage, marking the premature end of its promising journey.
The story, unfortunately, lacks the fairytale ending one might hope for. In the 1970s, amidst space constraints in the garage, the only FSO Syrena Sport met an untimely demise, alongside several other prototypes. Plans were lost, leaving behind only black and white pictures to reminisce about what could have been.
The modern interpretation of Syrena Sport, designed by Pavlo Burtaktskyy for Polish entrepreneur Rafal Czubaj, aimed to revive the spirit of the classic FSO Syrena Sport. (Picture from: MotorAuthority)
Later in 2013, a Polish entrepreneur named Rafal Czubaj attempted to revive the spirit of the Syrena Sport. Using the Nissan 370Z chassis and a design by Pavlo Burtaktskyy, Czubaj aimed to create a modern interpretation. While there is no visual resemblance to the 1950s prototype, the effort resulted in a single sample. Whether more will be produced hinges on public demand, keeping alive the dream of a legendary Polish sports car making a triumphant return.
The modern interpretation of Syrena Sport, built based on the Nissan 370Z chassis also include its 3.7-liter V6 engine that can generate power of 330 hp. (Picture from: MotorAuthority)
In the world of automotive history, the FSO Syrena Sport stands as a testament to creativity stifled by political ideologies. The echoes of its unique design still resonate, leaving enthusiasts to ponder what might have been if the winds of change had blown differently. The Syrena Sport's legacy endures, not just in faded photographs, but in the hearts of those who appreciate the artistry of an unfulfilled automotive masterpiece. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | AUTOKULT.PL | NODUM.ORG | MOTORAUTHORITY ]
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Thursday, February 15, 2024

Cadillac's Bold Leap: 'Le Monstre' at Le Mans 1950

PAST SpeedBEAST - In the year 1950, the 24-Hours of Le Mans regulations opened the door for an intriguing chapter in automotive history, allowing standard cars to undergo a fascinating transformation. This era witnessed the birth of one of the most peculiar cars to grace the legendary La Sarthe circuit.
The Cadillac 'Le Monstre' was one of two Cadillac Coupe DeVille Series 61s prepared by Frick-Tappett Motors for Briggs Cunningham to grace the starting line at the 1950 24-Hours of Le Mans. (Picture from: ConceptCarz)
Briggs Cunningham
, a visionary automotive enthusiast, seized this opportunity by bringing two Frick-Tappett Motors-prepared Cadillac Coupe DeVille Series 61s to the racing scene. The first car retained its original form, standing as a testament to the standard configuration, which the French dubbed Petit Pataud.
The Cadillac 'Le Monstre' and its sibling Cadillac Coupe DeVille Series 61 'Petit Pataud' in their hey-day run at the 1950 24-Hours of Le Mans. (Picture from: TopGear)
However, it was the second car that stole the spotlight, boasting a body that defied convention. Crafted from aluminum by Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, the unconventional bodywork aimed to maximize straight-line performance. This design was particularly crucial on the Mulsanne Straight, a 5.95 km stretch of the Le Mans track, accounting for nearly half of the total 13.5 km length. The car not only showcased a unique low and boxy exterior but also demonstrated a superior top speed, reaching 24 km/hour compared to its conventional counterpart.
The Cadillac 'Le Monstre' crafted from aluminum by Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, the unconventional bodywork aimed to maximize straight-line performance. (Picture from: RevsInstitute)
Despite its seemingly brick-like exterior, the car's narrow design, refined through extensive wind tunnel testing, contributed to its aerodynamic prowess. Surprisingly, it outpaced its teammate, achieving a remarkable top speed of 130 mph (209.22 kph)a notable 13 mph (20.92 kph) higher.
The Cadillac 'Le Monstre' not only showcased a unique low and boxy exterior but also demonstrated a superior top speed, reaching 24 km/hour compared to its conventional counterpart 'Petit Pataud'. (Picture from: SuperRask)
Dubbed Le Monstre by the French media, the car, driven by Briggs Cunningham and Phil Walter, left a lasting impression. Despite the initial promise shown by Le Monstre, the experiment faced an unfortunate end. The absence of a spade, a cruc ial tool for the race, proved costly as the car became ensnared in a sandbank. Compounded by a gearbox issue, Le Monstre concluded the race in the 11th position, trailing just behind its standard Coupe counterpart driven by Collier brothers, Miles and Sam Collier.
In the annals of automotive history, the tale of Le Monstre stands as a testament to the audacity of innovation, where a daring vision and unconventional design collided with the challenges of Le Mans, leaving an indelible mark on the racing legacy. Though the experiment may not have reaped the anticipated rewards, the spirit of Le Monstre lives on in the echoes of La Sarthe, reminding us that sometimes, it's the audacious endeavors that etch their names into the vibrant canvas of motorsport history. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | ID.MOTORSPORT | REVSINSTITUTE | CONCEPRCARZ | TOPGEAR | SUPERRASK | GOODWOOD ]
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Wednesday, February 14, 2024

Driving Ambitions: The John Evans Supercars Odyssey from Dreams to Reality

Passion & Ambition - In the world of automotive dreams, not many enthusiasts can turn their aspirations into reality, especially when it comes to owning or driving a supercar. For individuals like John Evans, an American automotive enthusiast with limited capital, the dream was not just about possession but also about creating something unique.
The 1989 Evans-Kudzu Series I GT posed along with its sibling Evans 486LM or Evans Series 3. (Picture from: Pinterest)
Evans harbored a vision that proved to be exceptionally challenging – designing a supercar inspired by racing series like Group-C and GT1, a machine that encapsulated cutting-edge technology but remained road-legal.
The initial model for Evans Automobiles, the Evans 386LM prototype, was designed by Dave Lynn. (Picture from: GT1History)
Founded in 1986 in Scottdale, Georgia, Evans Automobiles became the canvas for John Evans' ambitious project, the Evans 386LM model. Collaborating with the talented designer Dave Lynn (also recognized as the person behind the Kudzu GTP prototype), the company embarked on a journey to craft a supercar that defied conventional norms. 
Initially equipped with a 3.8 and 4.7-liter Buick engine, the Evans 386LM underwent an evolution to accommodate a potent V8, boasting a capacity of up to 7 liters and featuring an aluminum block. (Picture from: GT1History)
The 386LM (initially intended as the ACO verification car, as well as the EPA certification car) weighed a mere 1,048 kg, built on a tubular frame adorned with carbon panels, and featured a carbon fiber body. An adjustable suspension system added adaptability, allowing the car to conquer both specific tracks and public roads.
Standard features of the Evans 386LM included a luxurious carbon fiber and leather interior with a cork and leather-wrapped roll cage, a Quaiffe limited-slip differential, and powerful front and rear calipers. (Picture from: GTPlanet)
Initially equipped with a 3.8 and 4.7-liter Buick engine, the 386LM underwent an evolution to accommodate a potent V8, boasting a capacity of up to 7 liters and featuring an aluminum block. This powerhouse enabled the car to achieve a breathtaking acceleration to the first hundred in just 3.8 seconds, reaching an impressive top speed of 330 km/h
The Evans 386LM was the ACO verification car, as well as the EPA certification car, weighed a mere 1,048 kg, built on a tubular frame adorned with carbon panels, and featured a carbon fiber body. (Picture from: GT1History)
Additionally, various sources mention multiple engine options throughout the program's development, including the Buick 4.0 turbo V6 or supercharged Buick 3.8 (likely in the early stages). Later on, alternatives like the natural aspirated aluminum 5.7 V8 block or even the massive 427 cu.in. (7.0-liter) were considered.
The Evans 486LM essentially the same as the 386LM but with a different nose section for public road comfort. (Picture from: Carakoom)
Standard features of the Evans 386LM included a luxurious carbon fiber and leather interior with a cork and leather-wrapped roll cage, a Quaiffe limited-slip differential, and powerful front and rear calipers. Additionally, a single-element, adjustable carbon fiber rear wing and rear diffuser were part of the package. Optional amenities like air conditioning, power steering, hydraulic ride height control, rear view camera, and CD/DVD/radio added to the appeal.
The Evans 486LM's specifications are identical to the 386LM except for overall length and price. (Picture from: VWVortex)
However, the high starting price of over 100 thousand dollars posed a challenge for sales. Prospective buyers hesitated due to the hefty price tag and the implied high level of piloting skill required for regular track day use. Despite these hurdles, the American automaker persisted, introducing the Evans 486LM – essentially the same as the 386LM but with a different nose section for public road comfort.
The 1989 Evans-Kudzu Series I GT, originally designed by Dave Lynn, later became produced by Evans Automobiles. (Picture from: BringATrailer)
Over the years, Evans invested considerable time in the development of the 386LM and its counterpart, the 486LM. Despite efforts to showcase the company's ability to produce a reliable racing car with minimal maintenance demands, sales were slow. By 2005, the price dropped to 65 thousand dollars, and even the molds with all the drawings were put up for sale, but interest remained tepid. The ambitious plan met its demise with the bankruptcy of Evans Automobiles, and even a rebranding to Silva based in Las Vegas couldn't salvage the situation.
In the end, John Evans' dream of crafting an accessible yet high-performance supercar encountered challenges extending beyond the realms of design and engineering. The narrative of the 386LM and 486LM stands as a testament to the intricate process of transforming automotive dreams into tangible reality. It offers enthusiasts a story rich in ambition and innovation. This unexpected conclusion to a chapter in automotive history could also serve as potential inspiration for others aspiring to turn their dreams into reality. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CARAKOOM | DISENO-ART | GTPLANET | ALLCARINDEX | GT1 HISTORY | DAILYSPORTSCAR | BRINGATRAILER | VWVORTEX ]
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Tuesday, February 13, 2024

Rinspeed's E-GO Rocket: A Journey Back to 1940s Elegance with 1998 Flair

Unique ONES - Exploring the unique cars crafted by global automakers in the past is undeniably enjoyable, as it serves as a wellspring of inspiration for today's creative minds. One standout example is the E-GO Rocket, a groundbreaking concept car unveiled by Rinspeed AG. under the visionary leadership of Frank M. Rinderknecht. Renowned for their annual showcase of innovative designs at the Geneva Motor Show, Rinspeed consistently marries timeless aesthetics with cutting-edge technology, captivating audiences worldwide.
The Rinspeed E-GO Rocket is a groundbreaking concept car unveiled by Rinspeed AG. under the visionary leadership of Frank M. Rinderknecht, and unveiled at the 1998 Geneva "Salon de l'Auto" show. (Picture from: Rinspeed)
The E-GO Rocket, unveiled at the 1998 Geneva "Salon de l'Auto" show, is a testament to Rinspeed's commitment to pushing automotive boundaries. Developed within a swift six-month timeframe, this single-seater sports car challenges practicality norms, drawing inspiration from the sleek Bonneville salt flats land speed record cars of the 1940s.
The Rinspeed E-GO Rocket crafted with a composite body to achieve exceptional strength and rigidity while maintaining a lightweight profile at 1,050 kilograms. (Picture from: AllCarIndex)
Crafted with a composite body, the E-GO Rocket achieves exceptional strength and rigidity while maintaining a lightweight profile at 1,050 kilograms. The adjustable inclination of the windshield, coupled with 18-inch wheels adorned with 235/50 and 255/45 Continental tires, enhances both performance and visual appeal.
The Rinspeed E-GO Rocket' bodyworks built on a formidable steel tube frame, and powered by a supercharged aluminum-block V8 engine sourced from the renowned Eibach company. (Picture from: Rinspeed)
Beneath the classic racing car exterior lies a formidable powerhouse – a supercharged aluminum-block V8 engine sourced from the renowned Eibach company. Leveraging expertise from their work with international motorsport teams and the McLaren Formula 1 Racing Team, Rinspeed ensures a driving experience that transcends expectations.
By utilizing its engine power output of 410 horsepower, the Rinspeed E-GO Rocket capable to accelarate from 0 to 100 km/h in a mere 4.8 seconds, reaching a top speed of 260 km/h. (Picture from: DisenoArt)
With a rated output of 410 horsepower, the E-GO Rocket catapults from 0 to 100 km/h in a mere 4.8 seconds, reaching a top speed of 260 km/h. This impressive acceleration is a testament to Rinspeed's commitment to delivering not just aesthetics but also formidable performance.
The interior of the Rinspeed's single-seater marvel reflects a fusion of racing influences and modern comfort with the seat adorned in a mix of leather and washed blue denim, creates a unique ambiance. (Picture from: DisenoArt)
The interior of the Rinspeed's single-seater marvel reflects a fusion of racing influences and modern comfort. The seat, adorned in a mix of leather and washed blue denim, creates a unique ambiance. Despite the open-air cockpit and racing elements, the interior boasts high-end features such as satellite navigation and a multimedia system with CD/radio.
The Rinspeed E-GO Rocket boasts 18-inch wheels adorned with 235/50 and 255/45 Continental tires, enhancing both its performance and visual allure. (Picture from: DisenoArt)
While the Rinspeed E-GO Rocket is poised for production based on orders, the avant-garde creation's price remains undetermined. The anticipation surrounding the production units of this unique vehicle, beyond the one showcased at the 1998 Geneva Motor Show, adds an element of mystery to its exclusivity.
In essence, Rinspeed's E-GO Rocket stands as a testament to the brand's unwavering dedication to redefining the automotive landscape. The marriage of timeless design, advanced technology, and exhilarating performance positions this concept car as a symbol of innovation in the ever-evolving world of automobiles. The legacy of Rinspeed's daring concepts continues, leaving enthusiasts eagerly awaiting the next groundbreaking revelation. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | RINSPEED | DISENOART | ALLCARINDEX ]
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