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Showing posts with label Classic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Classic. Show all posts

Monday, May 27, 2024

Ferrari Reveals Secret Testarossa F90 Speciale After 18 Years

Mysterious Breed - The story of the Ferrari Testarossa F90 Speciale is a tale of secrecy, luxury, and automotive passion. Unlike the iconic Ferrari SF90 Stradale, which graced the roads in 2019, the F90 Speciale has a unique origin story that adds to its allure. It all began in 1988 when the HH Sultan of Brunei (some said His Highness' youngest brother) approached Pininfarina with a vision: to create six exclusive supercars based on the Ferrari Testarossa.
1988 Ferrari Testarossa F90 Speciale built by Pininfarina. (Picture from: Autoblog)
The project was veiled in secrecy, catching Ferrari completely unaware of its existence. Behind closed doors, the Italian coachbuilder commenced work on this venture at its headquarters, culminating in a car that bore some resemblance to the Pininfarina Ethos Concept. This endeavor led to the creation of what would become the Ferrari F90 Speciale.
1988 Ferrari Testarossa F90 Speciale built by Pininfarina. (Picture from: Fotki)
Branded as a symbol of Ferrari's trajectory into the 1990s, the F90 Speciale stayed true to its roots with the formidable 4.9-liter flat-12 engine from the Testarossa, boasting 396 horsepower and 490 Nm of torque, propelling the car's rear wheels with impressive force. The Ferrari F90 appears to be built on the Testarossa's chassis, identifiable by the chassis numbers of 83096, 86390, 86626, 86784, 87195 and 88171. Notably, the positions of the wheels and rearview mirrors also remained unchanged in this transition.
1988 Ferrari Testarossa F90 Speciale built by Pininfarina. (Picture from: Autoblog)
Despite its technical similarities to the Testarossa, the F90 Speciale's design was a departure from the norm. Enrico Fumia, then head of R&D at Pininfarina, spearheaded a unique aesthetic direction. The "Edge design," characterized by elliptical motifs, adorned the car's exterior, from taillights to rear wings. A distinctive feature was the roof glass panel that could slide over the rear window.
1988 Ferrari Testarossa F90 Speciale built by Pininfarina. (Picture from: Autoblog)
In 2005, Ferrari acknowledged the existence of six F90 Speciale cars, hailing them as bolder creations than what they had previously ventured. While sightings of the F90 Speciale outside Brunei are rare, enthusiasts catch glimpses through online media and historic publications like the Cavallino magazine.
1988 Ferrari Testarossa F90 Speciale built by Pininfarina. (Picture from: Autoblog)
Enrico Fumia's legacy extends beyond the F90 Speciale, with designs for Alfa Romeo GTV and Spider displaying similarities in aesthetic approach. Yet, the allure of the F90 Speciale lies in its mystique, housed within Brunei's exclusive supercar collection. Enthusiasts can only hope for a day when one of these gems graces public view, captivating automotive aficionados worldwide.
As we reflect on the enduring legacy of the F90 Speciale, our curiosity naturally extends to the other treasures nestled within Brunei's esteemed car collection. The enticing allure of vehicles like the Ferrari F50 Bolide, Ferrari Mythos, and Ferrari FX, as several other jewels in the Sultan's garage, beckons automotive enthusiasts to delve deeper into this realm of automotive opulence and innovation. *** [EKA [02012020] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | AUTOBLOG | PUBLIC.FOTKI ]
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The BMW 503: An Underrated Classic Car from Germany

Rare ONES - Did you know that the BMW 503 is one of the early models created by the German automotive giant, yet it remains relatively unknown to the public? This elegant two-door 2+2 grand tourer was produced by BMW from 1956 to 1959, a period when the world was recovering from the war and economies were starting to thrive again.
The BMW 503 (pictured in the Cabriolet model of 1956) was an elegant two-door 2+2 grand tourer produced by BMW from 1956 to 1959. (Picture from: BMW Group Classic)
The story of the BMW 503 begins with American car dealer Max Hoffman's request to BMW to create a vehicle that could rival the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL. The 503 made its debut at the 1955 Geneva Motor Show, where it was presented exclusively as a left-hand drive model.
The BMW 503 (pictured in the Cabriolet model of 1956) was designed by the esteemed Count Albrecht Goert, and made its debut at the 1955 Geneva Motor Show, where it was presented exclusively as a left-hand drive model. (Picture from: Autoevolution)
Designed by the esteemed Count Albrecht Goertz, who also designed the iconic Datsun 240Z, the BMW 503 was sold alongside the 501 and 502 sedans. This model marked a significant departure from BMW's pre-war designs, characterized by its tall, narrow engine compartments and curvaceous fenders.
The BMW 503 (pictured in the Cabriolet model of 1956) was a blend of modernity and elegance, featuring flush bodywork with matching doors and fenders. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
The body of the BMW 503 was a blend of modernity and elegance, featuring flush bodywork with matching doors and fenders. The design included a long hood and a short cabin with four windows that could roll down, giving it the appearance of a cabriolet rather than a typical coupe. Its narrow, tall kidney grille paid homage to the last BMW coupes manufactured before World War II.
Inside, the BMW 503 was the epitome of luxury for its time. The interior boasted a clean and sophisticated design, complete with three round gauges and a metal dashboard. The dash was adorned with ivory-colored buttons that enhanced the car's luxurious feel. The cabin could comfortably accommodate four passengers, making it a practical yet stylish choice.
The BMW 503 (pictured in the Coupe model of 1956) featured a narrow, tall kidney grille that paid homage to the last BMW coupes manufactured before World War II. (Picture from: ClassicDriver)
At the time, buyers had the option of choosing between two different steering wheels. One design featured four spokes in an X pattern, while the other had two spokes reminiscent of an airplane's wings. The dashboard included three buttons concealed by a small lip, a unique feature at the time. A centrally located radio added to the car's modern amenities.
The BMW 503 (pictured in the Coupe model of 1956) offered two steering wheel styles, one with four spokes in an X pattern, and featured a centrally located radio that added to the car's modern amenities. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
Under the hood, the BMW 503 was powered by a robust 3.2-liter V8 engine capable of producing up to 140 horsepower. Unlike the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL, which utilized a direct injection fuel system, BMW engineers opted for a more traditional carburetor system. This power was delivered to the rear wheels through a 4-speed manual gearbox, providing a thrilling driving experience.
The other steering wheel had two spokes reminiscent of an airplane's wings and was complemented by three round gauges and a metal dashboard. (Picture from: UltimateCarPage)
The 503 was available in both coupe and cabriolet body styles, developed alongside the more famous BMW 507 roadster. Unfortunately, both the 503 and 507 were priced significantly higher than initially projected, which meant they did not recoup their development costs. During its production run from May 1956 to March 1959, only 413 units of the BMW 503 were built, including 139 cabriolets. Despite its prestige, the high price tag led to significant financial losses for BMW.
The BMW 503 (pictured in the Coupe model of 1956) was powered by a robust 3.2-liter V8 engine capable of producing up to 140 horsepower, which was delivered to the rear wheels through a 4-speed manual gearbox, providing a thrilling driving experience. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
By the late 1950s, BMW faced financial difficulties, teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. The company managed to turn its fortunes around by focusing on producing smaller, more affordable cars like the Isetta. While these models did not have the power or luxury of the 503, they were more accessible to a broader market and played a crucial role in BMW's recovery.
The BMW 503 stands as a testament to the brand's dedication to innovation and luxury. It is a model that showcases the company's ability to blend style, performance, and elegance, even in challenging times. As we look back at the history of BMW, the 503 remains a symbol of resilience and ingenuity, reminding us of the brand's storied past and its journey towards becoming a leading name in the automotive world. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BMW GROUP CLASSIC | ULTIMATECARPAGE | AUTOFUN | CLASSICDRIVER | WIKIPEDIA | WAY | AUTOEVOLUTION ]
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Sunday, May 26, 2024

A gorgeous retro concept of Lincoln Indianapolis

ONE-OFF - Taking control of the Ford Motor Company in 1945, Henry Ford II embarked on a mission to modernize the company. He understood the importance of innovation and aimed to introduce groundbreaking designs that would set Ford apart. The Lincoln-Zephyr and Cosmopolitan were steps in this direction, but Ford had an even more radical vision for a new car to debut at the 1955 Turin Motor Show.
1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Boano retro concept is displayed for the first time at the 1955 Turin Motor Show. (Picture from: OtoBlitz)
During the mid-20th century, collaborations between American car manufacturers and Italian design houses were common. These partnerships allowed for the blending of American engineering with Italian flair. Chrysler teamed up with Ghia, Packard with Bertone, and Hudson with Carrozzeria Touring. Ford, looking for a unique and striking design, approached Felice Mario Boano to create a revolutionary concept car.
Right side view of 1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Boano retro concept. (Picture from: Hagerty)
Felice Mario Boano and his son, Gianpaolo Boano, were tasked with designing this new vehicle. The result was the Lincoln Indianapolis, an elegant and bold concept car that captured the essence of Ford's innovative spirit. Henry Ford II was impressed by the design and immediately approved its presentation at the Turin Motor Show.
The steering wheel and dashboard view of 1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Boano retro concept. (Picture from: Hagerty)
In 2002, the Lincoln Indianapolis underwent a complete restoration. The restoration team meticulously followed Boano's original design, ensuring that the car's integrity and aesthetic were preserved. The exterior was painted a vibrant orange, while the interior was upholstered in black-and-white genuine leather, replicating the original look.
1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Boano retro concept is equipped with a V8 engine capable of producing more than 200 horsepower. (Picture from: Hagerty)
The car's historical and artistic value was recognized in 2006 when it was sold at Gooding & Company’s auction in Pebble Beach, California, for $1,375,000. This significant sale highlighted the car's importance in automotive history. Five years later, the Lincoln Indianapolis was sold again at RM’s Andrews Collection sale in Fort Worth for $1.21 million, further cementing its status as a valuable collector's item.
Rear three quarter of 1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Boano retro concept. (Picture from: OtoBlitz)
The story of the Lincoln Indianapolis is a testament to the visionary leadership of Henry Ford II and the creative genius of Felice Mario Boano. Their collaboration resulted in a car that not only showcased cutting-edge design and engineering but also captured the imagination of car enthusiasts around the world. The Lincoln Indianapolis remains a symbol of innovation and a celebrated piece of automotive history.
In reflecting on the journey of the Lincoln Indianapolis, we see a blend of ambition, creativity, and collaboration. These elements came together to produce a car that was not only ahead of its time but also remains iconic to this day. This story serves as a reminder of what can be achieved when visionaries push the boundaries of what is possible, leaving a lasting legacy in the world of automotive design. *** [EKA [13042020] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | HAGERTY ]
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Friday, May 24, 2024

Mind Blowing: The Futuristic Transformation of the Lincoln Zephyr

Dream CAR - You may recall James Hetfield's classic custom car we discussed recently. This brings to mind the Lincoln Zephyr, a timeless classic adored by automotive enthusiasts, has undergone a mind-blowing transformation into a futuristic marvel known as Scrape
The Lincoln Zephyr 'Scrape' undergoes a timeless, mind-blowing transformation from classic gem to futuristic marvel, adored by automotive enthusiasts. (Picture from: MotorAuthority)
This visionary creation is the result of a nearly five-year collaboration between  Terry Cook, a former editor at Hot Rod magazine, and custom coach builder Ramsey Mosher, meticulously blending iconic design elements from the 1938-'39 and '40-'41 Lincoln Zephyr models.
The Lincoln Zephyr 'Scrape' is the result of a nearly five-year collaboration between Terry Cook, a former editor at Hot Rod magazine, and custom coach builder Ramsey Mosher. (Picture from: CarsThatNeverMadeItEtc)
Imagine a car that retains its essence as a Lincoln Zephyr while exuding a futuristic aura. That's precisely what Scrape embodies. The modifications, starting with a 1939 Lincoln Zephyr base, are nothing short of revolutionary. The car's dimensions have been enhanced, boasting increased length, width, and a strikingly low ground clearance that adds to its futuristic appeal without compromising its identity.
Inside the Scrape, a blend of classic charm and modern sophistication awaits, with stock dashboard, steering wheel, and seats honoring the Zephyr's heritage, while glossy black accents and two-tone leather upholstery elevate the interior to luxurious heights. (Picture from: MotorAuthority)
What sets Scrape apart is not just its exterior, but the meticulous attention to detail in every aspect. Custom builders dedicated countless hours to crafting a low-riding, chop-top masterpiece. The widened front and rear fenders, seamlessly integrated pillars, and a roof shortened to belly-button length redefine automotive elegance.
The Lincoln Zephyr Scrape's dimensions have been enhanced, featuring increased length, width, and a strikingly low ground clearance that enhances its futuristic appeal while maintaining its identity. (Picture from: MotorAuthority)
Stepping inside Scrape, you're greeted with a blend of classic charm and modern sophistication. The stock dashboard, steering wheel, and seats pay homage to the Zephyr's heritage, while glossy black accents and two-tone leather upholstery elevate the interior to a realm of luxury.
The Lincoln Zephyr 'Scrape' boasts a powerful engine rumored to spew fire from the exhaust, a stark departure from its original 4.4-liter V12 engine with 110 hp. (Picture from: BlackXperience)
While details about the engine remain shrouded in mystery, one thing is certain – "Scrape" is a beast under the hood. Rumors swirl about an engine so powerful that it spews fire from the exhaust, a testament to the departure from the original 4.4-liter V12 engine with 110 hp.
In the realm of automotive innovation, Scrape stands as a testament to boundless creativity and a passion for pushing the boundaries of what's possible. This futuristic modification of the Lincoln Zephyr is not just a car; it's a statement, a fusion of past and future that captivates the imagination and leaves an indelible mark on the automotive landscape. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | MOTORAUTHORITY | MOTORTREND | CLASSICCARS ]
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Thursday, May 23, 2024

Unique Transporters: Redefining Racing Cars in Automotive History

Forgotten ONES - Racing cars often steal the spotlight on the circuit, captivating fans with their speed, agility, and sleek designs. However, behind these racing machines lies a crucial but often overlooked component: the transporter vehicles. These transporters play a vital role in ensuring that the racing cars reach their destination safely and in style.
Mercedes-Benz unveiled the spectacular race car transporter, a brainchild of Rudolf Uhlenhaut, based on the 300SL 'Gullwing' sports car and capable of speeds over 100 mph. (Picture from: Mercedes-Benz)
Let's now delve into two iconic transporter vehicles that have left an indelible impact on the world of automotive racing: the 1955 Mercedes-Benz Race Team Transporter and the 1961 Cheetah Race Car Transporter.
Mercedes-Benz began developing racing car transport vehicles as early as 1924. (Picture from: FormTrends)
Mercedes-Benz
has always been at the forefront of innovation when it comes to transporting their race cars. As early as 1924, when Grand Prix cars were driven to races, Mercedes realized the advantages of specially converted high-performance touring cars for transporting their valuable vehicles. This forward-thinking approach set the stage for the development of unique transporter vehicles in the years to come.
This forward-thinking approach laid the groundwork for the development of unique transporter vehicles in the following years. (Picture from: Rockabilly-Rules)
In the 1930s, Mercedes-Benz introduced specially designed truck bodies to transport their racers, ensuring that these cars could be displayed proudly as they were driven through the streets. However, it wasn't until 1954 that Mercedes-Benz unveiled one of the most spectacular race car transporters ever see, known as a brainchild of Rudolf Uhlenhaut. This transporter, based on the 300SL high-performance 'Gullwing' sports car, was capable of reaching speeds of over 100 mph
Mercedes-Benz Rennabteilung transporter, a cab-forward hauler carrying Mercedes' grand prix cars piggyback-style. (Picture from: Mercedes-Benz)
As a result, Mercedes-Benz, with its blue Rennabteilung transportera severely cab-forward hauler that carried Mercedes' grand prix cars around piggyback style—garnered praise from the European press. Photos of the transporter trickled across the Atlantic over the following few years and set a new standard in transporter design.
The Cheetah Race Car Transporter, built by Norm Holtkamp in the 1960s, was inspired by similar vehicles from Mercedes-Benz. (Picture from: FormTrends)
Norm Holtkamp, a California race team owner, was inspired by Mercedes-Benz's innovative transporter and set out to create something similar for his own team. Faced with the inefficiencies of traditional trailers, Holtkamp envisioned a transporter that combined speed, functionality, and eye-catching design. His creation, the 1960 Cheetah Race Car Transporter, featured clean lines and unique proportions, making it a standout in the world of transporters.
To bring his vision to life, Holtkamp enlisted the help of designer Dave Deal and a skilled body fabricator. He combined elements from an aircraft tow truck, a new Chevy pickup truck cab, and a wrecked Mercedes 300 S sedan to create the distinctive Cheetah transporter. The head of the transporter, sourced from a 1959 El Camino cab section, added a touch of retro charm to the Cheetah transporter's modern design.
To realize his vision, Holtkamp collaborated with designer Dave Deal and a skilled body builder, blending components from an airplane tow truck, the cab of a new Chevy pickup truck, and a damaged Mercedes 300 S sedan to craft the unique Cheetah transporter. (Picture from: FormTrends)
Holtkamp's ingenuity in revolutionizing race car transporters is evident in his strategic placement of the engine and transmission behind the front wheels, contrasting with the traditional setup of the Mercedes transporter that positioned these components ahead of the front axle
The Cheetah Race Car Transporter, featuring a tuned Corvette small-block V-8 engine and a sleek aluminum body, showcased significant advancements in speed and technology, setting a new standard for race car transporters. (Picture from: Hemmings)
This innovative design, coupled with Holtkamp's ambition to achieve a remarkable speed of 112 mph compared to the Mercedes transporter's 105 mph, propelled the Cheetah transporter into a league of its own. Equipped with a tuned Corvette small-block V-8 engine and a sleek aluminum body, the Cheetah showcased significant advancements in speed and technology, setting a new standard for race car transporters. 
Holtkamp's meticulous attention to detail extended to optimizing weight distribution, with the inclusion of a ballast tank and two 24-gallon fuel tanks at the rear, enhancing the Cheetah's stability and performance. (Picture from: FormTrends)
Moreover, Holtkamp's attention to detail extended to optimizing weight distribution. The inclusion of a ballast tank and two 24-gallon fuel tanks at the rear not only contributed to the Cheetah's stability and performance but also underscored Holtkamp's unwavering dedication to pushing boundaries in the continuous evolution of race car transporters. This enhancement not only highlighted Holtkamp's dedication to pushing boundaries but also emphasized the continuous evolution of race car transporters.
Over the years, the Cheetah transporter changed hands and underwent modifications, but its enduring legacy as the Moon Transporter under the care of automotive historian Geoff Hacker stands as a testament to its impact on automotive history. (Picture from: FormTrends)
Over the years, the Cheetah transporter changed hands and underwent modifications, but its legacy endured. Today, it is known as the Moon Transporter, a testament to its enduring impact on automotive history. Under the care of automotive historian Geoff Hacker, the Moon Transporter serves as a reminder of the ingenuity and passion that drive innovation in the world of racing and transport. The following video showcases the rediscovery of the Cheetah transporter in 2018.
In conclusion, the world of automotive racing is not just about fast cars on the track; it's also about the innovative vehicles that transport these cars to their destinations. From the iconic Mercedes-Benz transporters of the 1950s to custom creations like the Cheetah transporter, each vehicle tells a story of engineering prowess and a relentless pursuit of excellence. As fans continue to marvel at the speed and performance of racing cars, let's not forget the unsung heroes of the road—the transporters that make it all possible. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | MERCEDES-BENZ | FORMTRENDS | AUTOCATALOG | HEMMINGS | ROCKABILLY-RULES ]
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Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Rare Polish SAM Car for Sale: Own a Piece of Automotive History!

Unknown ONES - You might have never seen or known about this car before. When we first stumbled upon a captivating post by QuirkyRides on X social media platform showcasing an anonymous unique car known only as the DKW F8 SAM (Samochód Amatorski Motoru/Amateur-built Vehicle), we were immediately intrigued. This vehicle, built on a 1930s DKW F8 chassis with a fiberglass body and powered by a SAAB engine, seamlessly marries classic style with modern power, creating a truly one-of-a-kind automobile.
This unique, custom-made Polish car, known only as the DKW F8 SAM (Samochód Amatorski Motoru/Amateur-built Vehicle) while sat on display at the Polish Aviation Museum in Kraków. (Picture from: MuzeumLotnictwaPolskiego)
Delving deeper into our online research, we discovered a surprising lack of available data about this fascinating car. According to IMCDb.org, this model, devoid of an official name, was the brainchild of Władysław Okarmus, an aircraft engineer and glider constructor
The DKW F8 SAM was the brainchild of Władysław Okarmus, an aircraft engineer and glider constructor during the 1950s to 1960s, a time when cars were scarce in Poland. (Picture from: SAABPLanet)
It was crafted using a 1938 DKW F8 chassis during the 1950s to 1960s, a time when cars were scarce in Poland. This scarcity led inventive "handymen" to build their cars from the remains of pre-war vehicles and other accessible materials.
The front of the car showcases unique elements such as a hood scoop, a large elliptical grille flanked by round headlights, and small turn signals, evoking a retro-futuristic aesthetic. (Picture from: QuirkyRides)
The construction of this car incorporates laminated bodywork, drawing inspiration from glider manufacturing techniques. Despite its age, a significant upgrade in the late 1980s saw the introduction of a SAAB' three-cylinder, two-stroke engine, probably with a capacity of 628 cc, giving it a visual resemblance to earlier Saab Sonett versions.
Being the only vehicle of its kind in the world, constructed from various elements including remnants of pre-war vehicles and other accessible materials, this car's value increases every day. (Picture from: Dyler)
The front of the car showcases unique elements such as a hood scoop, a large elliptical grille flanked by round headlights, and small turn signals, evoking a retro-futuristic aesthetic. As we move towards the rear, we find small fins that house the tail lights and serve as a compact trunk space.
The construction of this unique custom car features laminated bodywork on a 1938 DKW F8 chassis, drawing inspiration from glider manufacturing techniques. (Picture from: Dyler)
The precise number of units produced remains unknown, raising the possibility that only one of these bespoke vehicles was ever created. The timeline of its creation is also veiled in uncertainty, adding to its allure as a timeless piece of automotive artistry. This unique car can still be admired today at the Polish Aviation Museum in Kraków
This unique, custom-made Polish car is powered by a SAAB three-cylinder, two-stroke engine, likely with a capacity of 628 cc and capable of producing 22 horsepower. (Picture from: Dyler)
If you're interested in owning this car, now is the perfect time to make your move. According to Dyler, it's currently available for €23,700 through Austor, an automotive dealer company based in Poznań, Poland. Don't wait, act now! Place your bid immediately!
As we move towards the rear, we find small fins that house the tail lights and serve as a compact trunk space. (Picture from: SAABPLanet)
In essence, this custom-made Polish DKW F8 SAM embodies the ingenuity and artistic vision of its creator, seamlessly blending vintage charm with modern engineering prowess. Its rarity and enigmatic history render it a captivating subject for automotive enthusiasts and collectors, enhancing its allure and desirability among aficionados. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | QUIRKYRIDES | MUZEUM LOTNICTWA POLSKIEGO | AUSTOR.PL | WIKIPEDIA | DYLER | IMCDB.ORG | SAABPLANET ]
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