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Showing posts with label Scooter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Scooter. Show all posts

Friday, July 3, 2020

Vetter Torpedo, a unique HD Sportster-engined scooter

When we return to talking about scooters in their heyday in the 1950s to 1960s, it can be said that most motorcycle manufacturers around the world have tried their luck in making the scooters. How about in the United States? Besides being known as the country of origin of the Cushman scooter which later gave a design inspiration to an Italian designer named Corradino D'Ascanio to create the legendary Vespa scooter for Piaggio back in 1946
2004 Vetter Torpedo, a unique Harley Davidson Sportster-engined scooter created by one of the most legendary American motorcycle designers named Craig Vetter. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2Zv0nYg)
This country also has a long history with so many two-wheeled vehicle manufacturers that have been successful until now. Even well-known motorcycle American manufacturers such as Harley Davidson, which is always identical to the large-engined motorcycle figures, had also produced the scooters in 1960-1965 by using only 165cc 2-stroke engine, named the Harley Davidson Topper.
2004 Vetter Torpedo is designed in a distinctive style and color that became a trend in the 1950s such as portholes, tailfin, ribbed bumpers, two-tones colors. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3eSHkgZ)
And on this occasion, the scooter to be discussed is an American unique scooter that was built in such a way based on a design created by one of the most legendary American motorcycle designers named Craig Vetter by using a Harley Davidson Sportster engine. This unique scooter named Vetter Torpedo or Defiant was debuted in 2004 after two long years of the development process.
2004 Vetter Torpedo is designed in a distinctive style and color that became a trend in the 1950s such as portholes, tailfin, ribbed bumpers, two-tones colors. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3eSHkgZ)
As quoted by CraigVetter.com, this unique scooter design was made since 1977 to provide convenience for the rider and the scooter is designed in a distinctive style and color that became a trend in the 1950s. Yes indeed, there has never been anything like this before. The typical design of the 1950s was clearly attached to this scooter such as portholes, tailfin, ribbed bumpers, two-tones colors.
2004 Vetter Torpedo scooter fiberglass body shell with two-tones colors. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/31AvxQw)
The frame of this unique scooter was built by Sandy Kosman and the rest comes from the Harley-Davidson spare parts catalog. When it finished assembling, this scooter has a wheelbase of more than 2,000 mm with a dry weight of about 270 kg. lt.
2004 Vetter Torpedo scooter looked like underneath the fiberglass body shell, it utilized a lot of the Sportster's stock parts, including the fuel tank, which was re-located to a position behind the rider, just under the tail section. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/31AvxQw)
Then what about the Harley Davidson Sportster engine? And where is it mounted? The machine which has a capacity of around 1,638cc (100 cubic inches) is packed in the back under the seat including the fuel tank. The Sportster engine produces a power of 100 horses combined with the centrifugal clutch capable of making the rider's journey enjoyable.
2004 Vetter Torpedo scooter under the bright '56 Chev red and cream paint stood out among the black Harleys and death's head decorations. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2VBk27A)
Craig Vetter said, "I had a lot to do with the development of this kind of motorcycle. Today's touring machines are sophisticated and comfortable, but essentially the same kind of motorcycle I designed in 1977! Modern touring cycles are hard to get on and off because you must climb up and throw your leg over all that stuff. Frankly, I'm surprised we put up with this. The bright '56 Chev red and cream paint stood out among the black Harleys and death's head decorations. Nobody was afraid when I rode in."
As quoted by The Kneeslider, the scooter in the picture is a prototype, an example of the kind of bodywork that can be installed on the Defiant. This one had not had the footpegs or strap installed for a passenger but it can carry one. Defiant does not yet sell bodywork, this is kind of a 'roll your own' scooter, they sell the kit which consists of the frame that accepts all of the Sportster parts, the body is then up to you.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with the true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CRAIGVETTER.COM | MOTORSPORT.COM | BIGDOGADVENTURES | SCOOTERSOURCESPLACE | THENEWCAFERACERSOCIETY | THE KNEESLIDER]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Monday, June 29, 2020

Look the uniqueness Czechoslovakia-made scooters

After some time ago, we have been discussed how unique a police motorbike named Jawa 350 type 354 'Nanuk' from Czechoslovakia or now known as 2 countries namely the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Now on this occasion, once again we going to discuss the stories about some other unique scooters that were made by this Czechoslovakian manufacturer.
Jawa Manet S100 (left), Jawa Tatran S125 (middle), and Čezeta Type 501 or Jawa Boheme (right). (All pictures from: https://bit.ly/31n2bF and redrawn by EKA)
Indeed, when we talk about classic scooters from this country, certainly it can not be separated from the two well-known manufacturers of this country, namely Jawa and Čezeta to follow the trend as the other manufacturers from ItalyBritain, Germany, and other countries at the time.

1. Jawa (Jawa Týnec nad Sázavou)
This Czechoslovakia motorcycle manufacturer known besides marketing the ČezetaType 501 scooter under a model named Jawa Boheme, it turns out the company has also produced several scooter models that use smaller engines and are named Jawa Manet and Jawa Tatran.

The first scooter of this manufacturer to be discussed is Jawa Manet. And the name of the scooter was first used by the company on a 90cc engined motorbike produced in 1947 known as Jawa Manet 90. And eleven years later to be exact in 1958 the Jawa Manet S100 scooter was produced until 1967.
The ČezetaType 501 scooter was also marketed by Jawa under a model named 'Jawa Boheme' (with sidecars). (Picture from: https://bit.ly/31lTZVM)
This classic scooter at a glance has a similar appearance to the German's scooter DKW Hobby but has been equipped with quite advanced features for the time, such as electric starter, turn signal and hydraulic telescopic suspension in front while the rear suspension applied a swing with spring elements to support a pair of tires attached to 14-inches sized spoke-rims.
Jawa Manet S100 relies on a 98cc single-cylinder engine able to spew power of 5 horsepower. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3eJ9Wcu)
And as its drivetrain, this scooter relies on a 98cc single-cylinder engine which is capable of producing power of about 5 horsepower (3.7 kW), so as to be able to bring it to run to a top speed of around 70 kph.
After that, the Manet S125 model was produced in a short time starting in 1964 with the same exterior appearance as the S100 model but using a slightly larger engine, which is a 125cc air-cooled engine which is capable of producing about 7 horsepower (5.5 kW) so that can make it run-up to a top speed of around 85 kph. In addition, the Manet S125 muffler is mounted on the right side.
Jawa Tatran S125 uses a 125cc air-cooled engine that is capable of producing about 7 horsepower(Picture from: https://bit.ly/3eJ9Wcu)
And this Manet S125 scooter model is actually a transition model from Manet S100 to Tatran S125. So the production of the Tatran S125 model practically began at the same time as the Manet S125, with the significant change could be seen being the rectangular design on the front and rear fenders. But this scooter uses the same engine as the Manet S125 model.
In addition, the Tatran also features a high beam signal and improved turn signals and taillights. The Tatran S125 scooter production process ended in 1969, which also ended the production of scooters in Povazské Strojárne.😢

2. Čezeta (Česká zbrojovka Strakonice)
This Prague-based motorcycles and scooters manufacturer began production from 1935 to 1997. The first scooter of this company was the Čezeta Type 501 which was produced from 1957 to 1964. The futuristic Čezeta scooter owed its unusual appearance to the fact that its bulbous fuel tank was located above the front wheel.
Čezeta Type 501 uses a 171.8cc single-cylinder two-stroke engine. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3eIS9SJ)
The Type 501 scooter is Čezeta’s first scooter and then followed with the next model Type 502, with a unique design that was very popular among youngsters: the long seat is perfect to carry two persons. At 2 meters the 'torpedo-like' scooter is much longer than regular scooters in those days, holding a pretty large luggage compartment since the fuel tank is located above the front wheel. It powered by a 171.8cc single-cylinder two-stroke engine, and the Čezeta Type 501 scooter was also marketed as a Jawa under the 'Boheme' model name.
Čezeta Type 502 with a unique 'torpedo-shaped' in front and much longer than regular scooters in those days(Picture from: https://bit.ly/2YGRzPV)
There was even a three-wheeler version called the Čezeta Type 505 which was available with a variety of commercial bodies. While in some other time, there a classic scooter Čezeta Type 506 has emerged that has increased its propulsion, was at first the scooter using a conventional gasoline engine drive and then changed totally to an electric motor. If U wanna see it, let's jump to here.
Čezeta Type 505 three-wheeler was available with a variety of commercial bodies. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2YGRzPV)
Meanwhile, the sales numbers of all of those scooters mentioned above have never achieved success in the global market such as the scooters made in the Italian manufacturer like Piaggio, and Innocenti. Because this scooter was only sold in the eastern block countries at the time. As was known together the political order in Europe and the world at that time seemed to be divided into 2 great blocks, namely the west and east blocks. So it is not surprising if then the population of scooters made in Czechoslovakia are more widely circulated in eastern block countries and rarely found in other parts of the world.
And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | GOOGLE BOOK | SKUTERMANET.SK | DATABIKES.COM]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Bernardet, the legendary scooter from France

Talking about classic scooters is very fun because there are so many models from so many manufacturers that made it in its heyday around the 1950s to 1960s. It is undeniable, if a scooter is not just a two-wheeled vehicle to support people mobility, but has become a cultural trend in the community at that time.
Robert Bernardet was testing a Bernardet A.47 scooter prototype around the factory. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3hTxc9o)
1947 Bernardet A.47.
As a result, making the scooter into a commodity that is very much in demand in the market and promising abundant profits. So it is not surprising that so many manufacturers have sprung up from all over the world trying their luck by making scooters.

1948 Bernardet A.48.
This can also be seen clearly of the French companies which recorded to produce many beautiful and unique scooter models that are not inferior to those made in Italy, Germany, Britain, and other countries. This has been discussed in many articles previously.

1948 Bernardet B.49.
The history of this French company began in 1921 when the 3 brothers René, Robert, and Roger Bernardet built their first sidecar and presented it at shows in Paris, Berlin, and Geneva. They also recorded supplying sidecar bodies to René Gillet's motorcycle company.


1950 Bernardet BM.250.
The Bernardet brothers company continued to grow when in the 1930s it entered racing and achieved commercial success until 1940. During the war, all production stopped and resumed after the war ended with a small number of sidecars produced until 1948
1950 Bernardet C.50.

The company even produced a number of cars but none reached government authorization (because, it is said, your opposition to the communist-dominated government in the early years of the war) and then the manufacturer turned to scooter production and produced about 15 scooter models. different from 1947 to 1959.

1951 Bernardet ES.51.
The first prototype scooter was built in 1947 and known as Bernardet A.47. Then this model was produced for many years and offered various types of machines ranging from 49.9 cm3, 85 cm3, 98 cm3, 125 cm3, and 250 cm3.


1952 Bernardet Armee.
This company can be called one of the pioneers of scooters in France and marked their era with characteristic lines and their production covered any revolution of this popular two-wheeler until the crisis and the competition overcame their efforts in 1956.😢

1952 Bernardet D.51.
The scooter model ever produced by Bernardet in addition to the A.47 (128cc Ydral engine) prototype model which was then continued with the production model A.48 (125cc Ydral) and A.49 (125cc Lardy). Then there is the B.49 (125cc) model. In 1949 until 1951 they made the B.250 (250cc) model in versions 1 and 2, the model also continued to develop into BM.250

1953 Bernardet Y.52.
Furthermore, the C50 scooter model with 125 cm3 engine, E51 in 125 cm3, D51 in 250 cm3, Y52 in 125 cm3. Then came the Cabri series in 49.9, 85 and 98 cm3, to finish with Guépar in 125 cm3 Servomatic, the last of the production lines in 1956. The company also had time to make a 250cm3 scooter for French military needs which were then sent to Indo China and Mauritania during the conflict period.

1954 Bernardet Cabri.
The company completely stopped all production lines on March 9, 1959, which was the liquidation date of the company Bernardet-Le Poulain, which had bought the Bernardet brand in 1954, because it could no longer compete with the combined invasion rates of the Italian's Vespa and Lambretta scooters, which were able to make their annual production figures about 10 times higher.😢

1955 Bernardet Guepar.
And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BERNARDET | CYBERMOTORCYCLE]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Monday, June 22, 2020

Here's another unique Spaniard scooters

When we're making an article about a Spanish scooter called Rieju Isard, and caught a glimpse of the shape of the scooter displayed right next to Isard's scooter in the Baselle Motorcycle Museum in Spain. At first, we thought it was the 1950s French scooter named Bernardet C50. But after seeing the brand in front of the scooter, we realized that our guess was wrong.
1953 Husor 201 125cc on display at the Museu de la Moto de Barcelona in Spain. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/30WPHUE)
Inevitably the curiosity approached us, because of that then we made a search effort in cyberspace followed by asking fellow scooter enthusiasts on several well-known social media sites. From one of our colleagues named Jean-do EtJacotte who is a member of the Scooters of Germany Group on Facebook, then we learned it was the Husor 201 125cc. In fact, this scooter was built not based on the new scooter design, it is a modified version of the Soriano Puma 2 motorcycle, which was later produced at Imenasa's factory in Pamplona in 1953.
1953 Husor 201 125cc on display at the Museu de la Moto de Barcelona in Spain. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/30WPHUE)
The scooter mentioned above was built involved two well-known entrepreneurs in Spain in the time namely Navarra D. Félix Huarte, owner of Industrias Mecánicas de Navarra, Sa (Imenasa) and Ricardo Soriano, a Barcelona-domiciled businessman of Malaga, as well as a big fan of the motor world, who was also known to have developed cars and motorcycles in Europe especially France before the 2nd World War. 

In late 1952, Navarra D. Félix Huarte, owner of Industrias Mecánicas de Navarra bought the right to make a Puma 2 motorcycle from Ricardo Soriano, a Barcelona-domiciled businessman of Malaga, who had not yet passed the prototype phase. No wonder, if the scooter brand is taken by concatenating the first letters of HUarte and SORiano. It is equipped with a 125cc 2-stroke Villiers engine and coupled with the three-speeds transmission system. 
1954 Iruña 202 125cc on display at the Museu de la Moto de Barcelona in Spain. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/30UKNY2)
As quoted from the murzainqui.blogspot.com, it turns out that this scooter model is short-lived by only a few dozen scooters produced. It presented for the first time in March 1953 and stopped producing in September 1954 and the scooter had the honor of being the first Spanish scooter. In 1954, Soriano left the motorcycle business and moved to Marbella to undertake new business challenges in the tourism sector.

Meanwhile, Huarte then continued production of the scooter by launching the Iruña 202. As quoted from Historia del Automovil en Malaga, this new scooter was built based on a design made by Luís Alonso by taking advantage of the technical design part of the Husor 201 previous scooter.

The Iruña 202 scooter was produced from 1954 to 1957 in two colors offered, red and garnet in combination and semi-metallic brown. A total of nearly 1,000 units, although perhaps only 400 were sold. And this unique-shaped scooter uses a 125cc 2-stroke Villers engine combined with a 3-speed manual transmission system so that it is able to carry a scooter with an empty weight of around 90kg able to run up to a top speed of 70 kph.
1954 Iruña 202 125cc on display at the Museu de la Moto de Barcelona in Spain. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/30UKNY2)
But in the midst of heavy business competition in the motor vehicle market at that time, where the Italian scooter brands such as Vespa and Lambretta dominated the market plus part of their production process was also carried out in Spain. So that makes it as one of many Spaniard local brands is unable to compete and eventually cease the producing. 

Currently, the 1953 Husor 201 scooter is included in a row of rare scooters, and you can see it on display as one of the collections of the Museu de la Moto de Barcelona in Spain. Likewise with the Iruña 202 scooters.
And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CYBERMOTORCYCLE | FORMULAMOTO | MI CLASICO | DE ALGUNA MANERA | STABILCAR | HISTORIA DE AUTOMOVIL EN MALAGA | MURZAINQUI]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Thursday, June 18, 2020

A Swedish-made scooter

This time we will discuss a scooter made in Sweden, one of the Scandinavian countries. The scooter in question was produced by Monark, a bicycle, moped, and motorcycle manufacturer that has a production base in Varberg, Sweden.
1957 Monark Monarscoot moped uses a German ILO 50cc 2-stroke engine and pedals like a bicycle. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2UNN5o8)
This Swedish manufacturer was founded in 1908 by an industrialist named Birger Svensson. This manufacturer is also known as Cykelfabriken Monark AB and Monark AB. It is estimated that the first motorcycle of this manufacturer rolled out in 1913. But, there is also a mention of its first motorcycle made in 1908 because this manufacturer is also known to produce a lot of motorcycles under various brands before using their own brand.
1961 Monark Monarscoot scooter uses a Husqvarna 50cc 2-stroke engine that had a footrest, kickstart, and with no pedals. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3ej4ixD)
For scooters, the company originally made a moped called Monark Monarscoot. This two-wheeled vehicle was designed by Sixten Sason, also known as the famous SAAB automotive designer. This is one of the moped models that in terms of design has its own characteristics. 

At the beginning of its born in 1957, this two-wheeled vehicle used a German's ILO engine with pedals such as bicycles as well as using the high-wheels like a motorcycle in general.
1964 Monark Monarscoot scooter uses a Husqvarna "Flinta" engine and 10" wheels sized, which also makes it more like the Italian scooter models. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2Bc7GeO)
But along with the time of its development, when in 1961 when a new Sweden rules stating that the mopeds were no longer required to have pedals. So the Monark Monarscoot got its footrest and kickstart since then the model deserves to be called as a scooter.

As mentioned above, an early model of Monark Monarscoot production in 1957 that used the ILO engine with pedals (as a moped). Then for the next model (which can be called a scooter) was roled out in 1965-1968 using the Husqvarna "Flinta" engine. For this model, it uses 10'' wheels sized, which also makes it looks like the Italian scooters.
From then on the competitor, Husqvarna, licensed the Monarscoot and marketed it under their own name. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2Bc7GeO)
From then on the competitor, Husqvarna, licensed the Monarscoot and marketed it under their own name. Then the use of the engine changed again for the model produced in 1969 which is the final year of production, where it uses the Sach engine.
Although the production of Monarscoot scooters had to end in 1969, due to intense competition in the global motorcycle market at that time, the Swedish manufacturer continued to produce motorcycles, especially sport motorcycles, until the manufacturer actually stopped producing in 1975.😭

And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CYBERMOTORCYCLE.COM | RETRORAMBLING | WIKIPEDIA | OPENISO.ORG | CLASSICMOTOR.SE | AUCTIONET.COM | KLARAVIK.ES | AUTOCART.BIZ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

The misunderstood Isard scooter

If we talk about the scooter from the beginning to this day certainly it never ended. Due to this two-wheeled vehicle that started from a very simple form (two wheels and a plank) which then developed in such a way that it was incarnated in various forms as it is today (but still maintained its distinctive shape) and has become one of the modes of transportation that have many users throughout the world to this day.
The Rieju Isard scooters are assumed unsuccessful in the market so that its production was stopped in 1960. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2UGTLEE)
In the heyday of scooters back in the 1950s to 1960s, it was countless how many manufacturers tried their luck to be a success and reaping fortune by producing scooters. Apparently, it seems like they were all inspired by the success stories of the Italian manufacturer duo, Piaggio, and Innocenti who succeeded in bringing the scooters to the whole world. So it can't be denied if the Italian ​​scooter success stories also spread quickly to Spain. 
The Rieju Isard scooter looks so tempting with an appearance almost 'full cover body,' and high-wheels posture. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3d1fiy5)
Noted a number of Spanish manufacturing companies also had produced scooters. One of them is Rieju, the mopeds and motorcycles manufacturers that has a production base in Figueres, Spain. This Spaniard motorcycle manufacturer was founded by two young businessmen, Luis Riera Carré and Jaime Juanola Farres in 1934. They began their entrepreneurial adventure by manufacturing bicycle accessories. They fused their names together to create the RIEJU brand name (RIEra+JUanola).
The Rieju Isard scooter uses 50 and 125cc AMC air-cooled engines. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2B7pGHm)
They began to purchase property to construct a factory, but the Spanish Civil War interrupted their plans. After the hard times were over, the Figueres-based returned to its original habitat by making many motorcycle models. Until one day they heard of the success story of the Italian scooter maker duo. So then they decided to try their luck at gaining a big-profit by making a scooter.
The Rieju Isard scooter shape looks like a motorcycle-scooter fusion. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2B7pGHm)
However, this Figueres-based manufacturer did not adopt the reference for its scooter products from Italy but prefer to France. At that time the average French-made scooters had a slightly different shape from the Italian scooters. Where the French scooters use the high wheel posture as it is commonly used by motorbikes in general so that its shape looks like a motorcycle-scooter fusion.

In 1956, Rieju worked on the development of a scooter, by using 50 and 125cc AMC engines. The design was based on the French Sulky high-wheel scooter. In 1958, Rieju introduced its commercial version of the scooter project under the name Rieju Isard, a motorcycle-scooter fusion with a very unique look.
1957 Rieju Isard 125cc (right) posed along with 1955 Derbi Masculino 125cc (left). (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2Y47w2i)
The introduction of a bold and daring look, combined with the ambition to introduce a perfect finished project to the market. In fact, this model nearly drove the company to fail, since it was never successful in the commercial market, and the company made the decision to cease the scooter production in 1960 with very few units sold. Apparently, the low mechanical accessibility and its high price were the main reasons for its low market demands.
1957 Rieju Isard 125cc attached with a sidecar. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3d3WVbR)
It is believed that this scooter population is very small, making it one of the rare scooters that are sought after by collectors. Although there is no longer Rieju Isard scooter on its production list, this Spanish brand continues to produce motorbikes to this day, especially the sportbikes, and also develops electric-powered motorcycles.
And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | RIEJU | CYBERMOTORCYCLE | BORINOSMALLORCA | WIKIPEDIA | DERNY]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Sunday, June 14, 2020

This 'Dunkley' was not a baby stroller

You must have never seen and heard of a Dunkley scooter before, like We either. This scooter was made by a British company in the pre-war period, known as a baby stroller maker. And after the 2nd World War ended, the company made a transition by following the trend to make small motorbikes, mopeds, and scooters. Uniquely, the Dunkley scooter has some very unusual lines, as if it was made out of all flat panels.
1959 Dunkley Popular scooter made by the famous British baby stroller maker. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2XWYGTN)
At the time this odd scooter went on sale in 1959, in England itself also produced many brands and types of scooters. Whereas in the global market many manufacturers at almost the same time trying to get a large market share, while the Piaggio's Vespa and Innocenti's Lambretta scooters being dominated the world's scooter market in that time. So it's not surprising they all failed in the market. 
1959 Dunkley Popular scooter has some very unusual lines as if it was made out of all flat panels. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2XWYGTN)
The British manufacturer is estimated to have made more than a thousand units of scooters during its production period (manufactured for one year) and is marketed limited in mainland Europe and a little to America. But it is estimated that not many can survive at this time.

Uniquely, this strange scooter is named Dunkley Popular, which is driven by a 50cc four-stroke engine that is capable of producing around 20hp of power and coupled with a two-speed transmission which is operated through the handlebars. So it is estimated to be able to carry the scooter running up to a top speed of around 30mph.
1959 Dunkley Popular scooter uses a 50cc four-stroke engine coupled with a 2-speed transmission system. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2XWYGTN)
If you look at the style of the Dunkley Popular scooter look similar to the German scooters. The British manufacturer seems to be linked to Mercury Industries, a German manufacturer who in 1956 made a scooter that had a similar shape, the Mercury Hermes Scooter. And the Mercury scooter is a copy of the German Meister Solo Roller that made a year earlier. 
1955 Meister M45 Solo Roller inspiring style sources of the Brit's Dunkley Popular scooter. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2XYkC0O)
So it is not surprising, when juxtaposed with Vespa'59 for example it looks like the Dunkley scooter is less prestigious because of its appearance that is too old. Maybe that's why this scooter was never sold well at that time.
1959 Dunkley Popular scooter is estimated able to run up to a top speed of around 30mph. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2XWYGTN)
But now, the conditions may be a little different and it is estimated that the Dunkley scooter price will skyrocket because it is a rare item and is rarely found for sale in the near future. And we agreed, for a scooter collector who might have a garage full of Italian and German scooters, this one could have a serious appeal and certainly not a difficult case to spend some money to get it.
1959 Dunkley Popular scooter is a rare item now and is rarely found for sale in the near future. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2XWYGTN)
And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.
Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | ONLINE BICYCLE MUSEUM | BRING A TRAILER]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.