-->
Drop Down MenusCSS Drop Down MenuPure CSS Dropdown Menu

CLASSIC

Try with us
Showing posts with label Scooter. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Scooter. Show all posts

Friday, September 23, 2022

A unique-shaped Hausmann scooter ahead of its time

~Rare ONE~ Finding a unique scooter that we've never seen before is like finding a treasure and giving it its own happiness. We felt this recently, when we found a unique-shaped classic scooter image on QuirkyRides status in Twitter some time ago. At first glance the scooter looks similar to German big scooters such as Maico Mobil, Glas Goggo, or custom-made scooter based on Piaggio Vespa.
The unique-shaped Hausman Scooter made by Jaroslav Hausman, a Czechoslovakian engineer back in 1947. (Picture from: QuirkyRides's status on Twitter)
We're assure most of you have never seen one before. After we searched for info on the internet and got only a little information from several sources, finally we've found out that it was the Hausman Scooter or Skùtr Hausman which was made long before any other big scooters came into this world. As you can see, it was a unique-shaped scooter prototype made by Jaroslav Hausman, a Czechoslovakian engineer back in 1947. So who is Jaroslav Hausman?
The unique-shaped Hausman Scooter sat on displays in the Auto Moto Museum Oldtimer Kopřivnice in Kopřivnice, Czech Republic. (Picture from: CEAutoClassic.eu)
As quoted of CEAutoClassic.eu, he is one of the designers who works for Carrosserie Sodomka, a well-known coachbuilder company based in Bohemia, owned by Josef Sodomka, before nationalized under the communist regime in 1948 and renamed into Karosa n.p. whose its production is concentrated in coachbuilding of large vehicles such as busses and trolleybuses for many Czechoslovakian and others car marques then.
The unique-shaped Hausman Scooter has a large space for the spare wheel under its front cover. (Picture from: CEAutoClassic.eu)
Related to the unique-shaped Hausman Scooter, it's known that they finished only a single complete prototype, along with several other frames. So far the prototype has been hidden in its original state for decades under the possession of the Hausman family.
The Hausman Scooter is built on a tubular frame supported with two 10-inches wheels and powered by an air-cooled 170 cc CZ engine. (Picture from: MotoCollection.org)
The unique-shaped scooter has a weighs around 120 kg is built on a tubular frame, and supported with two 10-inches wheels. This unique-shaped scooter is powered by an air-cooled 170 cc CZ engine which is said to be capable of carrying it galloping up to a maximum speed of 100 kilometers per hour. Meanwhile, under its front cover is a large space for the spare wheel.
The unique-shaped Hausman Scooter sat on displays in the Auto Moto Museum Oldtimer Kopřivnice in Kopřivnice, Czech Republic. (Picture from: CEAutoClassic.eu)
Reportedly the 170 cc engine used was quite successful so that 6 units were prepared, where one of them was used for this Hausman Scooter prototype while the rest was prepared specifically for racing motorcycles.
The Hausman Scooter has a quite unique fin shape parts that's reminds us of the same shape that exists in a series of American's automobiles a decade later so it can be said ahead of its time. (Picture from: MotoCollection.org)
This Hausman Scooter has quite unique parts and it can be said ahead of its time. How not, if you pay attention, this scooter has a fin-like shape that immediately reminds us of the same shape that exists in a series of American's automobiles a decade later and had becoming a trend during 1950s to 1960s.

Although the Hausman Scooter had received many attentions when launched for the first time to public in 1947 at an engineering exhibition in that country with the plan soon to be developed into a mass product, but due to political reasons this never happened.🤔
Well if you are curious this Hausman Scooter whereabout todays. As quoted of CEAutoClassic.eu, currently this unique-shaped scooter sat on displays in an automotive museum called Auto Moto Museum Oldtimer Kopřivnice in Kopřivnice, Czech Republic along with another original frame and original blueprints of another version, which has never been realised.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | QUIRKYRIDES | CEAUTOCLASSIC.EU | MOTOCOLLECTION.ORG | WIKIPEDIA | AUTOMOTOMUSEUMCZ ]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone.

Friday, May 13, 2022

A classic strange cyclops-looked three-wheeler made in Japan

~What Do U Think About IT~ Well on this occasion we will talk about a tiny unique classic vehicle made by a Japanese car maker of the 1950s called Fuji Cabin Model 5A. At first glance, this three-wheeled vehicle has a unique cyclops-like appearance (in modern day might be similar to Mike Wazowski, a main character of the Disney-Pixar's Monsters, Inc. animated series) if we've seen from front.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A three-wheeled vehicle has a unique look similar to a main character in Monsters, Inc. animated series named Mike Wazowski if seen from the front. (Picture from: CarStyling.ru)
The such type of vehicle story began shortly after the country's defeat in World War 2 is believed that was one of the Japan's companies effort to survive. Well, this effort is also what the Diesel Automobile Manufacturing Company done after its car-making division divided into the Hino truck and Isuzu car manufacturing businesses while the aviation division became Hitachi Aviation in March 1946.
This is the Fuji Cabin Model 5A of the 1950s worthy to be crowned as the most unique look three-wheeler ever made by Japanese company. (Picture from: CarStyling.ru)
In that time developing new aviation technology was strictly forbidden by the Allies, as it was considered a war industry. So Hitachi Aviation, as well as other aircraft companies, tried to survive in non-war-related industries. The company subsequently changed its name to the Tokyo Gas and Electric Manufacturing Company in 1952, and began producing 60cc engines for motorbikes and had established itself as an engine producer of mainly small two-stroke engines.
The Fuji Cabin three-wheeled vehicle designed by Ryuichi Tomiya, and appeared for the first time at the 1955 Tokyo Motor Show. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
Then it merged with a Tokyo-based manufacturing company, Fuji Toshuda Motors of Tokyo and started to build their own motorcycles under the names of Fuji Motor and Gasuden FMC, besides supplied engines to other motorcycle makers. As time goes by, the company is decided to produce a kind of scooter with the roof or what we've known later as a micro car.
The Suminoe Flying Feather, an early 350cc kei-car designed by Ryuichi Tomiya for Suminoe Manufacturing back in 1954. (Picture from: Flickr-MrScharroo)
The mentioned micro cars was designed by Ryuichi Tomiya whose before the war had been in charge of body design at Nissan Motors, and afterwards he was responsible for the design of the Suminoe Flying Feather for Suminoe Manufacturing, of which 150 examples were built between 1954 and 1955. His work was highly respected, which later made him known as the 'Leonardo da Vinci of Japan'.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A has a glassfibre bodyshell built on monocoque construction and also equipped with a single headlight, strengthened by a full-length tunnel bringing cooling air directly to the engine. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
And the Tomiya's masterpiece is the Fuji Cabin appeared for the first time at the 1955 Tokyo Motor Show as a streamlined two-seater three-wheeled coupé, and powered by a 122cc single-cylinder Gasuden scooter two-stroke engine with kick start. The unique look vehicle has a glassfibre bodyshell built on monocoque construction and also equipped with a single headlight, strengthened by a full-length tunnel bringing cooling air directly to the engine. 
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A appears to have been designed only to be driven by those of small stature like many of the Japanese at the time, as the car's interior was ludicrously cramped. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
So that when viewed from the front it looks like a creature of Greek mythology, the cyclops. While at rear, there were two rounded beetle-wing lids providing access to the motor and allowing warm air to exit. At first there was a single door on the left, but later cars got one for each side.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A is powered by powered by a 122cc single-cylinder Gasuden scooter two-stroke engine with kick start. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A appears to have been designed only to be driven by those of small stature like many of the Japanese at the time, as the car's interior was ludicrously cramped, with far too much effort required to climb over the central tunnel to get into the staggered driver’s seat.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A three-wheeled vehicle is a fairly good product with a sturdy construction, but also has a poor quality of bodyshell due to the maker having lack experience working with glassfibre. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
Unlike ordinary cars, the Fuji Cabin is controlled by a set of handlebars positioned close to the driver's seat for comfort, and is equipped with a small but well-engineered transmission system that incorporates a reverse gear; something unusual for a typical Western-scooter engined microcar. At that time Fuji Cabin three-wheeled vehicle was planned to be made as many as 400-500 per month, but in fact only 85 units were made all during its short production period from 1957 to 1958.
In general, the Fuji Cabin Model 5A is a fairly good product with a sturdy construction, but that doesn't mean there are no drawbacks, it's because the makers having lack experience working with glassfibre, so its bodyshell has poor quality. Besides that its sale was not a success partly because considered to be an expensive vehicle and also Fuji had no experience of marketing.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops......*** [EKA [09012015] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BELOW THE RADAR | CARSTYLING.RU | ROAD&TRACK | FANDOM ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Wednesday, February 23, 2022

Little about the unique American Doodle Bug scooter

~Hiawatha Run~ As we all know, the 1930s and 1940s were times when the world was hit by a severe economic recession. So that this difficult condition also had an impact on the people's ability to buy four-wheeled vehicles at that time. Well, who would have thought, in such conditions there was then a scooter called the Doodle Bug which was first launch in the 1940s as an alternative to affordable vehicles for the public in America at that time. Related to its unique name, it is likely taken from a small insect called a doodlebug.
The Doodle Bug Scooter developed by the Beam Manufacturing Company in Webster City, Iowa to be sold by the Gambles department store chain in the late of the 1940s. (Picture from: Silodrome)
As quoted of the Silodrome, initially the scooter was intended for a kind of vehicle market for teenagers and those too young to ride a motorcycle on the road. Thus this Doodle Bug, Cushman, the Crocker Scootabout scooters, etc were born in America. 

However, this condition suddenly changed after World War II, where there was a significant surge in demand for motorcycles. Thus the Italian scooters born that we know today, such as the Vespa and Lambretta which is said were inspired by the American scooter designs.
The Doodle Bug Scooter has a simple tubular steel frame and a Briggs & Stratton NP engine. (Picture from: Silodrome)
At that time, people needed a simple and economical mode of transportation. And the simple scooter such the Doodle Bug could be the right answer to fulfill the market demand. Its cheap price tag and easy to ride were the positive reasons why the scooter was selling well at that time. Beside that there's one weakness, just don't expect the scooter could be run at a high speed.
The Doodle Bug Scooter has a thickly padded seat in lieu of suspension and a small rear-mounted fuel tank.. (Picture from: Silodrome)
How could be? Because this Beam Manufacturing Company developed scooter is powered by a very simple 4-stroke, side valve, single cylinder engine of the Briggs & Stratton NP capable spewing power 1.5 hp only. During the Doodle Bug production, turn out the company also used the Clinton engine beside the Briggs & Stratton NP ones. But mostly the NP engine was fitted to the overwhelming majority of Doodle Bugs, and it’s also the easiest to find parts for given its popularity.
The Doodle Bug Scooter could be made 100% road legal using aftermarket kits to add the required headlight and taillight. (Picture from: Pinterest)
The scooter was developed by the engineers of the Webster City based company with a simple tubular steel frame structure with the engine mounted behind under the seat. The rider's feet rest on a flat steel platform which is the scooter typical style, the fuel tank is rear mounted behind the seat above the rear tire. That is it! Even the scooter is not equipped with suspension or lights. Only two pneumatic tires to be a kind of suspension between the rider and the road. However, lighting (headlight and taillight) is an optional feature that can be installed on the Doodle Bug, if wanted to be road-legal vehicle.
During its production period from 1946 to 1948, the factory produced more than 40,000 Doodle Bugs, most of which were sold as “Hiawatha Doodle Bugs” by Gambles. Back in the day, Doodle Bugs sold for less than $100. Today, they are the focus of the Doodle Bug Club of America and a unique collector’s item. This American scooters have a huge fans across the United States, and there is still an annual gathering for owners and restorers in Webster City (where all Doodle Bug scooters are made).

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of two-wheeled monster and stay alive with the true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SILODROME | ID.MOTOR1 ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Wednesday, February 16, 2022

Here's the forerunner of Piaggio MP3 today

~The Forerunner MP3~ We are sure most of you must have seen the Piaggio MP3 passing by on the streets in your place. But has it ever think by us how the Italian scooter manufacturer first developed it? Well, on this occasion we will show to You the figure of several three-wheeled vehicles that were ever develop and launch in the 1980s which is most likely the forerunner of the Piaggio MP3.
The Trautwein Doppelfront Prototype built on Piaggio Vespa PX 200 E-Lusso by Dr. Wolfgang Trautwein. (Picture from: MedienWerkStatt)
You would be remembered that long before the Piaggio MP3 was born, the Italian scooter manufacturer had also produced simple three-wheeled vehicles such as the Piaggio Ape. Of course, in terms of appearance and technology, the classic three-wheeled vehicle is far behind when compared to the MP3.

Then you will ask whether previously there were three-wheeled vehicles that had technology similar to the Piaggio MP3, of course the answers were many, such as the Italjet Scooop without forgetting the Renault Ublò concept or Autostudi A-Trix and many others.
The Trautwein Doppelfront Prototype built on Piaggio Vespa PX 200 E-Lusso while on the road testing. (Picture from: SoyMotero.net)
Well, when we talk about the Piaggio MP3, of course we will discuss exclusively about tilting three wheeler vehicles, not vehicles like the classic Piaggio Ape, sidecars (there are also tilted) or ordinary tricycles. So it can simply be said that what we will be discussed is more focus on three-wheeled vehicles with two wheels positioned in front (such later adopted by the Piaggio MP3), because it is considered more rational, stable and effective than the one which has two wheels at rear.
The Trautwein Doppelfront Prototype built on Piaggio Vespa PK 125 by Dr. Wolfgang Trautwein. (Picture from: 2StrokeBuzz)
It's hard to say who actually first developed a three-wheeled vehicle like this. However, the history of the tilting three wheeler vehicle can be said to have started with a such vehicle developed in 1946 by Ernst Neumann called the Neander N2. As can be seen from the old image circulating in internet, the Neumann-developed three-wheeled vehicle is a three-wheeled racing car that looks has double spring that tip with driver's weight, so it can tilt while speeding on the curves.
The Trautwein Doppelfront Prototype built on Piaggio Vespa PK 125 while on the road testing. (Picture from: BikeIt.gr)
Dr. Wolfgang Trautwein
(Picture from: Maxmatic.com)
And the forerunner of the MP3 which was specifically developed by the Italian manufacturer stems from the Trautwein Doppelfront tilting three-wheeled prototype which was originally developed by an engineer, inventor from Meersburg at the Bodensee, Germany named Dr. Wolfgang Trautwein in the 1980s.

Initially, the concept started from the implemented vehicle by a simple and effective dual-wheel in front, where its modular steering system so that it can be combined with different vehicles, it is even said to have been installed on the Honda CX500C and is combined with the Silver Wing fairing model (not a scooter as it is today).
The first tilting three-wheeler developed in 1946 by Ernst Neumann called the Neander N2 racing car that looks has double spring that tip with driver's weight, so it can tilt while speeding on the curves. (Picture from: Cybermotorcycle)
Dr. Trautwein suggested the concept using the Vespa-scooter platform, exactly three decades after the first motorcycle was equipped with a double-front chassis. In mid-1984 Dr. Trautwein received two original Vespa scooters (Vespa PX 200 E-Lusso and Vespa PK 125) from the Genoa-based scooter manufacturer to build a prototype of the tilting three-wheeler vehicle which later could be considered to be the forerunner of the MP3 today.
The Trautwein Doppelfront Prototype built on Honda CX 500 by Dr. Wolfgang Trautwein. (Picture from: Wikimedia)
Under the hoods, the Vespa tricycles hide the newest variant of the Trautwein developed front axle for motorcycles, known as the parallelogram axle. Thus, the scooter effectively avoids wheel-flutter. The suspension is arranged so that the wheels do not only turn when rolling, but also tilt. The floorboards of the Vespa are firmly connected to the lower parallelogram, and follow its movements. This changed style of driving comes relatively easily to the rider.
The Trautwein Doppelfront Prototype built on Honda CX 500 while on the road testing. (Picture from: Epilog.de)
And according to Dr. Trautwein, the chassis offers many safety advantages, ie decreased hazard of front end slip on wet pavement, rails, etc. The vehicle provided more safer braking, better handling when it cornering. Furthermore it provided more space for a trunk over the front axle. Besides, the comfort is quite convincing.
The Aprilia Los Angeles three-wheeler concept is shown as a prototype of the Intelligent Mobility Lab. Motorizzato Piaggio Master 500 at the 2000 Bologna Motorshow. (Picture from: ApriliaForum)
The concept of a tilting three-wheeled vehicle is continuously being developed by Piaggio and at the 2000 Bologna Motorshow, another well-known Italian brand, Aprilia launched the Los Angeles is a prototype of the Intelligent Mobility Lab. Motorizzato Piaggio Master 500, refined and evolved and already has the electro-hydraulic block to do without the stand. There is no mention of production, but of accessories, ABS, GPS and a covered version with a reclining roof. Unfortunately, it will remain a prototype, even in this case it is the lack of economic liquidity that takes away the possibility of driving it on the roads, but now the way is marked.
The Piaggio MP3 500 HPE Sport Advanced known as the world's first tilting three-wheeled vehicle featured with reverse gear. (Picture from: GridOto)
Finally the first model of Piaggio MP3 was launched in 2006 and marketed globally by this Italian manufacturer which then occupies the highest niche in its production line to this day. The Piaggio MP3 is known as the world's first tilting three-wheeled motorcycle which is equipped with various mainstay features so that it is claimed to be more safer to ride. And today Piaggio MP3 comes in many variants under several powertrain options ie 250cc, 300cc, 400cc and 500cc. 🇮🇹
Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of two-wheeled monster and stay alive with the true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | MODERNVESPA.COM | CYBERSCOOTER.IT | CYBERMOTORCYCLE | APRILIAFORUM | 2STROKEBUZZ ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Monday, February 14, 2022

Here's one of the German scooters lost in time

~The Extinct Scooter~ Scooters are a new, affordable mode of transportation that quickly gained popularity shortly after the end of World War II. Almost all of mainland Europe and even the world feel the vibration of this scooter trend.
The Neroba Roller attained prototype stage only, and never been produced due to expensive production cost plus the absence of investors who were support the financing. (Picture from: Hannsklemm)
Wilhelm Neuscheler posed along
with his Neroba Roller scooter.

(Picture from: Hannsklemm)
When Vespa and Lambretta dominate scooters markets in Europe back in then 1950s to 1960s. So dominant, that two Italian brands are considered to be the legends almost without any competitors. Then what about in Germany? 

Apparently this scooter trend is also felt and has attracted the interest of entrepreneurs in those country to produce scooters, which tried to fills a niche that exists in between those two Italian scooter brands, especially for the fulfillment of the domestic scooter market. 

At that time, there were many scooters made by well-known German manufacturers such as DKW Hobby, Glass Gogo, Heinkel Tourist, Zundapp Bella, Dürkopp Diana, Maico Mobil, and others. Among the many scooters there are also names that sound strange to those of us coming from outside Germany such as Bastert Einspurauto, Kroboth Motorroller, Röhr Roletta 200, Riedel Till, Horex Rebell 250, Franke Autoroller, Schweppe Pirol, FAKA-Walba, Venus, Lutz, IWL-made scooters, and many others. And may be many others that are unknown, like this one:
The overall design of the Neroba Roller is similar to another classic German scooters at the time. (Picture from: Scooters of Germany Group)
Well, we saw a picture of this scooter that we have never seen before which posted on the Facebook page of the Scooters of Germany Group by Mr. Marco Bohème.  We are sure many of you must have never seen this one German scooter. Based on the information we got from the Facebook pages, the scooter was named Neroba Roller whose prototype was designed and built by Wilhelm Neuscheler, an aeronautical engineer in the 1950s.
The Neroba Roller was designed with such a nice backbone construction made of cast aluminum to support the body. (Picture from: Hannsklemm)
According to Mr. Marco Bohème, initially he got this unique scooter information from the old magazine Klassik Motorrad Nr.6 edition of November-December, 2010. Too bad we don't have and get the mentioned old magazine physically, so in the case we only got less information about the Wilhelm Neuschler made scooter virtually through the Facebook's pages and the Hannsklemm sites.

As quoted of Hannsklemm, the Neroba Roller prototype was developed by Wilhelm Neuscheler, when he and his family moved to Rommelsbach shortly after the end of World War II in late 1949 or early 1950. Later to commercialize his designed scooter, he also founded a company named Neroba (short of Neuscheler Rommelsbach).
There's no information regarding the drivetrain of the Neroba Roller  scooter, but it looks like the Neroba Roller is powered by a 150cc or 175cc 2-stroke engine. (Picture from: Hannsklemm)
Furthermore, the Neroba Roller is designed with such a nice backbone construction made of cast aluminum to support the body. While viewed of the front, it looks rounded similar to the bullet with a single large headlight. Too bad we also didn't find any information regarding the drivetrain of this scooter, but it looks like the Neroba Roller is powered by a 150cc or 175cc 2-stroke engine.

Uniquely, the German-made scooter has a trunk above the front wheels and some said make it to be hardly to ride. In our opinion it's unlikely, as you can see from the pictures the Neroba Roller's front body is separate from the scooter controller construction. What do you think?
Unfortunately there are none left today, and seems that all of the Neroba Roller scooters are lost with the passage of time. (Picture from: Hannsklemm)
Due to the high production costs, worsened by the absence of investors who were support the financing, at the end this scooter made by Neuscheler never entered the production line. And as written on an article on of the Automarkt  trade journal of February, 1954 issue stated that there're only 10 units of the Neroba Roller scooters ready for sale at the time. Unfortunately there are none left today, and seems that all of those Neuscheler-made scooters are lost with the passage of time.😭

And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below the article.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of two-wheeled monster and stay alive with the true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops.....*** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SCOOTERS OF GERMANY GROUP  | HANNSKLEMM  ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Monday, February 7, 2022

All of these scooters ever served in battlefields during WWII

~Tough Scooters~ The need for a reliable vehicle is very supportive of the smooth running of a military operation in a war situation. For this reason, in several wars that have occurred in the world, it is known that many manufacturers have supplied two-wheeled vehicles, especially motorcycles which were developed specifically for military purposes. 
During WWII the Cushman Motor Works built aroud 495 units of this Cushman Model 32 with sidecars for US armed forces. (Picture from: Fagenfighterswwiimuseum)
It turned out that among many two-wheeled vehicles had been involved in wars, there were also special scooters that had tasks for military logistics, personnel transportation up to special forces rides. For example, during the World War II, the American military deployed hundreds up to thousands of the Cushman scooters in Europe to support the Allies troops operations there.
The military version of Cushman scooters is built based of the Auto Glide (in pictured the 1934 Cushman Auto Glide Model 34). (Picture from: Mecum)
All of these tough scooters are made by the Cushman Motor Works, a Nebraska-based manufacturing company. The Nebraska-based manufacturer company was in the business of making engines for industrial and farm use. Initially, the company grew slowly until WWII, up to they decided that could be sold more engines they made by producing a scooter named Cushman Auto Glide around 1934. At that time, the Cushman-made scooter was fairly economical with the consumption of 1 gallon of fuel and it could cover a distance of up to 75 miles.
During WWII the Cushman Motor Works built aroud 4,700 units of this Cushman Model 39 three-wheeler for US armed forces. (Picture from: Pinterest)
Once upon a time Cushman Motor Works then got the US military contract for developing the military version scooters that can be deployed and moved fast into battlefield. To fullfil the contract, during WWII they made three models of scooters based of the Auto Glide, ie the Cushman Model 32, Cushman Model 39 three-wheeler and Cushman Model 53 Airborne. They were issued models with 7-inch, 8-inch or 9-inch tires, and came with minimal lighting and brackets to save on materials.
This Cushman Model 39 three-wheeler proved useful on air and naval bases as a general purpose utility cart to tow anything ranging of a jeep, truck even an aircraft. (Picture from: Blog.streetsideauto.com)
All of the models successfully attract the US' Department of Defense due to its excellent agility and capability on the battlefield, more over the Model 53 is powered by a little one-cylinder 4 hp engine, which was good for run up to speed of 40 mph, and the wide tires were designed to run and survive in Europe’s muddy dirt roads.
1943 Cushman Model 53 Airborne scooter was able to parachuted out of aircraft and also featured with wide tires were designed to run and survive in Europe’s muddy dirt roads. (Picture from: Motorbikesearchengine)
The scooter also known as with the Cushman Airborne due to it was able to parachuted out of aircraft. It's known that the American troops had used the Cushman Model 53 Airborne to get around German defense tactics of destroying roads and bridges in the Dolomites (a section of the Alps) and the Austrian border areas.
1943 Cushman Model 53 Airborne scooter is powered by a little one-cylinder 4 hp engine, which was good for 40 mph. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
In the late stages of the war in Europe, Allied paratroopers used scooters like this one to maintain contact between units, increase their mobility and haul small loads. An extraordinary ability shown by this scooter on the European battlefield. 
Blue print of the Lambretta 125M (A) known as the first Innocenti-made scooter based of the Cushman Airborne Model 53. (Picture from: IdnTimes)
And shortly after the war was over, the Cushman Model 53 made as the inspiration sources for Corradino D'Ascanio in creating initial scooter design for Innocenti but failed to have a certain deal and then gave it to Piaggio. The inspired scooter design of the Model 53 later produced by those Italian company duo became the most popular scooters in the world until now.💃

And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.
Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of two-wheeled monster and stay alive with the true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BLOG.STREETSIDEAUTO.COM | FAGENFIGHTERSWWIIMUSEUM.ORG  ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.