Drop Down MenusCSS Drop Down MenuPure CSS Dropdown Menu

CLASSIC

Try with us

Join & Get Updates

Showing posts with label Automotives. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Automotives. Show all posts

Saturday, January 16, 2021

Zora Duntov's Corvette SS race car concept of 1957

The beauty of the design, the powerful engine and the compact dimensions were the reasons of many people fall in love with the Corvette legendary roadster made by Chevrolet. Might be this was what the auto engineers and designers at the one of American automotive giant subsidiaries tried to promote when they first launched the legendary model.
1957 Chevrolet Corvette SS encounters smoke at Indy’s Brickyard Invitational in 2014. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2XqMqtD)
This can be seen in the Chevrolet Corvette SS, a gorgeous and powerfull as well concept car that was deliberately made initially with the aim of competing in the 24-Hours of LeMans, but was later touted as the forerunner of many Corvette sports/racing car models.
1957 Chevrolet Corvette SS sat on display at the 17th Annual Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance in 2012. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3buFGmZ)
The concept car's design and construction process was carried out by the GM's  team of engineers and designers led by the talented Zora Arkus-Duntov, to create a lightweight and powerful racing car and took the Mercedes 300SL as their based template.

Before we discuss more about the car, it's good for us to get to know a little about Zora Arkus-Duntov. He is a Belgian-born American engineer whose work at the Chevrolet Corvette earned him the nickname "Father of the Corvette."
The talented engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov sat behind the wheel of his creation 1957 Chevrolet Corvette SS. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2XEcAJL)
As a result, the car was lightweight thanks to using the magnesium made bodywork (with only a weight of 1,850 lbs) enveloping the tubular steel frames, it also features with the front suspension of coil-over-shocks, de Dion rear axle and built-in aluminum drum brakes.

The Duntov's team only made two chassis, the first was a test car dubbed the 'Mule' and the other to be a race one. Then as their drivetrain, it's pinned under the hood a small block V8 engine with fuel injection which can produce power reaching of 307 horsepower at 6,400 rpm.
1957 Chevrolet Corvette SS sat on display at the 17th Annual Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance in 2012. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3buFGmZ)
After the cars completed in 1957, the first test would not be carried out at the 24-Hours LeMans, but in an almost similar race but shorter in America, namely the 12-Hours of Sebring. Although the racing results of the Corvette SS for the first time at Sebring were not going well, where suspension problems and another mechanical failure forced it stop after speedy only in 23 laps.

However, the Chevrolet Corvette 'SS' managed to set a new lap record in that race. So General Motors is very enthusiastic about the potential of the SS based on those results of the training and the speed of the laps.
1957 Chevrolet Corvette SS sat on display at the 17th Annual Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance in 2012. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3buFGmZ)
Not only that it turned out, Juan Manuel Fangio, the winner at the 12-Hours Sebring of 1957, was quite impressed with the car, and then tested the Corvette SS in training sessions. The results were astonishing, Fangio completed his one full lap of 3: 27.4 seconds, that's faster in a car he had never driven before than any other driver could in a car they had driven before.

Despite GM's enthusiasm, unfortunately the Corvette should be scrapped several months later, as the American auto-making community band together to ban the manufacture of factory-produced racing cars. This was triggered by a great accident that occurred at the 24-Hours Le Mans of 1955 which claimed the lives of 83 people, since then the public attitude towards automotive racing has changed drastically.
1957 Chevrolet Corvette SS sat on display at the 17th Annual Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance in 2012. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3buFGmZ)
Protests forced many companies to withdraw from racing, organizers reviewed safety rules, and Mercedes, which was accused to involve directly to the accidents mentioned above then decided to refuse to participate in any auto races until the 1970s.
But it won't stop GM from launching the Corvette as a sports car for the layman who likes to combine the look and feel of a race car with the comfort of a daily-using vehicle. Then Zora Arkus-Duntov, those car's engineer-designer, presented it to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on May 29, 1967, during the drivers meeting before the 51st Indy 500 mile race started, paced by the Chevrolet Camaro.

And then it's no surprise that to this day, the Corvette is renowned for producing some of the finest cars not only in the United States, but all over the world... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | HEMMINGS | CONCEPTCARZ | WIKIPEDIA | RCNMAG | CORVETTEBLOGGER ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Friday, January 15, 2021

McLaren Sabre, the FASTEST McLaren's non-hybrid two-seater model ever

Of the many premium car manufacturers in the world, there are several brands that sound very prestige. For example, Ferrari, Lamborghini, and McLaren, who are diligent in presenting premuim quality cars for world automotive enthusiasts to date. Recently, McLaren, one of the British premium automotive brands had launched a supercar that comes with a very cool design coupled with a performance above the average sports car ever.
McLaren Sabre is touted the McLaren's fastest non-hybrid two-seater model ever. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MLjRoP)
Previously we also had presented an article about an assumed  supercar as the McLaren with the production code of BC-03 recorded in a spy-shot photo some time ago. So, at that time, as seen in the photo, there was a car covered by camouflage all over its body passing by somewhere at unknown location. 
McLaren Saber is a non-hybrid two-seater model specially designed by the McLaren's Special Operation (MSO division). (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MLjRoP)
And now it's finally revealed that the car in question is a high-performance car recently launched by the Woking-based manufacturer and named the McLaren Sabre. As quoted from Autocar, the supercar was specially designed by McLaren's Special Operations (MSO) division and only made 15 units. Beside that the supercar was also claimed to be able to reach speeds of 218 mph, making it the McLaren's fastest non-hybrid two-seater model ever produced to date.
McLaren Sabre features extensive body modifications made possible by homologation requirements. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MLjRoP)
By design, the supercar does come with a very unique design by applying swing-up doors and a huge dorsal fin connected to the rear wing. It is suspected that the customer who commisioned it also had a hand in adjusting the dynamics of the car to suit their needs during the prototype's test run in early 2020.
McLaren Sabre has a very unique design by applying swing-up doors and a huge dorsal fin connected to the rear wing. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MLjRoP)
Although previously McLaren has committed to presenting a hybrid supercar. But, this time, the British manufacturer still wants to present a new product without the intervention of an electric motor. And Sabre is said to be using a 4.0 liter twin-turbo V8 McLaren engine which is believed to be capable of producing up to 824 bhp of power. And when compared to the McLaren Senna, the Sabre is 35 bhp stronger with a torque of 590 lb.ft.
McLaren Sabre uses a 4.0 liter twin-turbo V8 McLaren engine which is believed to be capable of producing up to 824 bhp of power and a torque of 590 lb.ft. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MLjRoP)
The McLaren Sabre features extensive body modifications made possible by homologation requirements. And the result is a McLaren Sabre Aero package which is said to be reaching "new limits" through the LMP1-style fins that sit in the center of the roof, coupled with a giant rear diffuser and a distinctive three-slat wing.
An example of the first McLaren Sabre model has been shipped for an undisclosed price, and is estimated to be in the seven digits of US dollar. While another 14 examples will be coming to 14 other customers in the next few months of 2021. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | AUTOCAR | CARSCOOPS | ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Thursday, January 14, 2021

A marriage of beauty and style into an impractical Dodge Charger III

As we all know that Chrysler now FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobile), one of the three giant American automotive companies has built many unique and interesting concept cars in the past few decades. So on this occasion we try to present a future concept car made in 1968 by Dodge (an American car brand under Chrysler) which is named Dodge Charger III. 
1968 Dodge Charger III concept car appeared as a two-seater sportscar with a very slim body profile like an arrow. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3nln8rv)
This car is a classic two-seater sportscar concept with a very slim body profile like an arrow, so it's no exaggeration if the American company then claims it to be the most aerodynamic car has ever built.

Despite having such an aerodynamic shape, but infact, it was simply impractical. Because the cabin feels narrow and cramped, and you could not be to lower the side windows so that fresh air enters the cabin. Because, instead of having the normal windshield and separate side windows, in fact the Dodge Charger III only has a circular one-piece glass fixed permanently in a fiberglass canopy.
1968 Dodge Charger III concept car has no normal doors and to get into the cabin You have to lift the air spring-based canopy. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MCGKKV)
Uniquely, the Charger III doesn't have normal doors and windows, so to get into the cabin, you have to lift the air spring-based canopy by pressing a special button. As the entire canopy is lifted, the bucket seats will automatically rise by 8 inches, the steering wheel and instrument panel will swing upwards to allow easier access for the driver and passenger. Looks fancy? Maybe, but it's definitely impractical.
1968 Dodge Charger III concept car has narrow and cramped cabin with only two bucket seats to accomodate the driver and passenger inside. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MCGKKV)
Even so, the concept car, which was completed in 1968, still looks modern today. This concept car is actually part of a Dodge promotion, designed to showcase all of the company's latest technology and engineering advancements, particularly in the aerodynamics
1968 Dodge Charger III concept car has the hidden headlights under its long sloping hood that resemble to the Corvette front-end. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MCGKKV)
In 1969, Robert B. McCurry, the Dodge's general manager at the time said, "The Charger III is an idea car. Or, better call it an idea exchange. This experimental vehicle is our way of showing the public some of the design concepts and techniques we have developed. From the public, we learn what they want (or don't like) to see in future cars. That's why we conducted a special consumer survey at auto shows Many of the features seen in the Charger III may also be included in our cars in the not too distant future. long time."
1968 Dodge Charger III concept car has special experimental braking system with three air brake flaps synchronized with the regular braking system. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MCGKKV)
The Charger III concept has hidden headlights under its long sloping hood that resemble to the Corvette front-end. While, the car's rear-end reminds us to the Pete Brock-designed Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupe, and then the roofline and chopped-off tail reminds of the Ferrari Breadvan. It definitely, those aerodynamic designs intended to make the car can run really fast on a race track.

The Dodge Charger III concept is equipped with a 426 cubic-inches dimensioned V8 Hemi engine and is installed in front of the passenger compartment under the long hood. Uniquely, the Dodge Charger III features a service access panel located just behind the front left wheel.
Some said that the 1968 Dodge Charger III concept car equipped with a 426 cubic-inches dimensioned V8 Hemi engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MCGKKV)
This seems to make it easier for the driver to check at a glance the engine oil, coolant and battery fluid levels, and also to house the fuse panel. So, anyone can do a complete inspection to the engine without opening the hood.

Then there is also, an experimental braking system by using three air brake flaps synchronized with the regular braking system and acting as an air foil brake (like an airplane). This is not to slow down the speed of the car, but to help the car's stability during sudden braked. And under this brake cap are two gas filler caps. 
Although the 1968 Dodge Charger III concept is quite eye-catching, it looks like this car is too complicated and impractical for mass production. Therefore, the 1968 Dodge Charger III only ended up as a very unique concept car, of course. 

The Charger III remains a stillborn dream machine, and it took more than 25 years to bring its basic design into the Viper GTS form. This proves that even a good idea may take some time to find the light of day.*** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | MYCARREQUEST | CONCEPTCARZ ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

The Studebaker Sceptre had unique electric razor shaped front-grille

The existence of concept cars in the world's automotive is not always made by car manufacturers but also made by independent automotive designers who are then submitted to the car manufacturers to be used as production models. Among the many concept cars created by automotive designers that had circulated in the 1960s, it turns out that the Studebaker Sceptre was able to give a little impression.
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2L4xzTa)
The Studebaker
Sceptre is one of a series of cars made and proposed by Brooks Stevens, a renowned Milwaukee industrial designer in 1962-1963 to replace the old Studebaker's product line. The Scepter concept car design results were given to the Studebaker's CEO Sherwood Egbert and company management in April 1963 as the replacement of 1966 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk, which also happened to be a Brooks Stevens design.
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3pNvD03)
But unfortunately the timing was not right, because the American automotive company was in poor condition and was on the verge of bankruptcy. As we know, that Studebaker almost lost all options to survive in the spring of 1963, and was forced to seal off all of its factory doors before the end of that year. It is a shame that the striking Sceptre was never came out of the Studebaker's assembly line at the South Bend factory. Indeed, no one could guarantee at the time whether the 1966 Studebaker Sceptre presence would bring success and save the company at the same time
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Los8OG)
.
Stevens had the only Sceptre prototype built by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano, a little-known and short-lived (only five years, 1962-1966) but highly regarded Italian coachbuilder that was also responsible for Virgil Exner’s stunning Mercer Cobra. The Italian coachbuilder company directed by Pietro Sibona, formerly of Ghia, and brothers Elio and Emilio Basano was made the beautifully detailed prototype on the Studebaker chassis for $16,000 (a remarkable price in those days).
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3pNvD03)
As qouted of the Macsmotorcitygarage, the observers noted that the Brooks Stevens's automotive designs could range from the basic to the baroque. In our opinion, the Sceptre is one of the cleanest and most elegant examples of all, with simple visual elements that cleverly complement one another. It shows on the distinctive front end featuring an electric-razor grille with a Sylvania Light Bar system to illuminate the roadway.
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Los8OG)
While the rear styling includes an ingenious and useful clamshell trunk opening, and the broad C-pillar, with polarizing glass panels, are touted as a stylized representation of the formal roof that Stevens uses on the GT Hawk and his reskinned Brazilian Aero Willys. And the Sylvania light bar is also used at the rear-end, but is hidden behind a full-width ruby plastic lens.

Then the cabin is brought a modern Italian style touche, combined with black and gold vinyl trim and a large, airy greenhouse flooded with light. The thermometer-type speedometer and instrument panels are housed in a plastic pod at the top of the dashboard, while the passenger side features a large vanity area with folding mirror.
Although, eventually the Studebaker Corporation failed to survive as a carmaker, while on the opposite, the one-off Sceptre prototype managed to survive. Fortunately, the car resided in the Brooks Stevens Automotive Museum in Mequon, Wisconsin for many years, and these days can be seen at the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend, Indiana. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | MACSMOTORCITYGARAGE.COM ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Monday, January 11, 2021

Bizzare Jet-engined VW Beetle

The modification results of a Volkswagen 'New' Beetle below are guaranteed to have never seen before by You. Just imagine, there is a cutie Beetle, suddenly a jet engine pops out of its tail. Then who made the insane crazy vehicle like this?
A Bizzare jet-engined Volkswagen Beetle made by Ron Patrick. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3nYil02)
As quoted from RobbReport, He is Ron Patrick, A Californian engineer who has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford. What is the purpose of making this unique vehicle? Ron Patrick said that the car making was a manifestation of his desire to make the wildest vehicle that was feasible and legally used on the highway.

As for what inspired him to make it, it was a combination of sheer desire and ability. "It just seemed like an obvious thing to do at the time," he told Robb Report. "Who wouldn't want a jet-powered VW?  Hell, life’s short, if you have the time, skill, and money to do something—do it!"😮

In the process, Ron retained the original VW Beetle as it was. The modified VW Beetle uses 2 (two) engine units, where the VW's original engine unit is stored at the front to drive the front wheels and the other unit is a General Electric T58 8F jet engine mounted on the rear to drive the rear wheels. Now, the cutie VW Beetle transformed into an all-wheel drive (AWD) jet-engined VW Beetle!
A close-up of the General Electric T58-8F engine used by Volkswagen Beetle. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3nYil02)
The jet engine provides an additional 1.350 horsepower (plus the burst of dramatic effect of flame) which can be directly activated through special control in the form of a throttle lever located next to the transmission lever.

The jet engine, which was originally used as a helicopter turboshaft motor. It can spin up to 26,000 rpm and idle at 13,000 rpm. So will the jet engine not destroy the body of the VW Beetle? The jet engine is positioned by means of sandwich plates bolted to contoured aluminum billets which are fed into the frame rails.
The Ron Patrick's 'Jet Beetle' in action with the flame-throwing out of its General Electric T58-8F engine of its tail. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3nYil02)
The machine has a solid stand with sliding rubber bushings at the front and rear. While in hot conditions, this engine stand will adjust itself to expand. There's a heat blanket should also be added to the front bumper so that it doesn't melt when the jet engine is started.

Of course this jet engine is very wasteful of fuel which is certainly not use ordinary fuel too. It needs attention before starting the jet engine, first make sure the safe distance in around the car, especially the rear.😊
The Ron Patrick's 'flamethrower' VW Beetle nicknamed 'Jet Beetle' apparently has been registered able to use legally on the streets. And reportedly the car is offered to those of you who are interested in owning it with a price tag of around the US. $500,000 (approx Rp. 700 millions).

Wow, it turns out to put a flamethrower on the tail of a car is expensive too! What if You're owned this VW, where will You go with the Jet Beetle? If We owned it, We will go to camping ground and makes some campfire to warm the atmosphere.😉 *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | ROBB REPORT ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Sunday, January 10, 2021

Born to be Collectible

It is not something extraordinary if there are cars produced for collection items. This can happen because of the limited amount of production or caused by other things such as the factory stopping production, and so on.
1958 Packard Hawk was distinguished in key ways by its designer, with a fiberglass front end and modified deck cover to look like a typical American 4-seater sports car. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
And at the end of the 1950s there were car models that were produced in a very short time and then instantly became collectibles. The car was a typical American sports car called the Packard Hawk born in 1958 which back then positioned as an alternative model to the market-favorite Ford Thunderbird, which offered a new version in 1958 as well.
Packard Hawk is appeared beautifully finished in Parchment white with gold trim on the tailfin. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Lcud02)
As we know Packard was no longer existed after 1958 and never before ventured into the realm of sports cars, so the Packard Hawk became a production car for just one year as well as one of the car models produced by the American car manufacturer Studebaker and rebadged as the Packard model with only 588 units ever came off the assembly line.
1958 Packard Hawk is the essence of the 1950’s beauty, with flashy trim, tailfins, a hardtop, and a powerful supercharged engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
Well, it is known that this model was built on a Duncan McRae's design specifically made to be the personal sports car of Roy T. Hurley, president of Curtiss-Wright Corporation, who took over the Packard factory in 1953 due to doesn't want to see the Packard big-name corporate to collapse, and he continued the Packard production in Detroit for three years while acquiring the flagging Studebaker Corp. in South Bend, Indiana.
1958 Packard Hawk cabin covered by a beautiful genuine leather with full instrumentation in an engine-turned dash. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
In 1957, Packard moved to the Studebaker facility. Actually, at the time Packard was left only the suck brand with the sale numbers continued to slump followed its bad reputation and was booed by the Packard lovers due to the cheaper cars built in the mid-1950s and called as "Packardbakers."
1958 Packard Hawk uses a Studebaker 289  V-8 engine coupled with McCulloch supercharger. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
To restore Packard's reputation for quality, Hurley decided to use his custom-built two-door hardtop as a prototype of the 1958 Hawk and touted as the "Family Sports Car," the Hawk actually began production in January 1957.
1958 Packard Hawk has a wide and low opening just above the front bumper and covers the entire width of the car underneath and the top has a sloping nose and hood. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
Although similar-looking to Studebaker's 1957 tail-finned Golden Hawk, the Packard Hawk was distinguished in key ways by its designer, with a fiberglass front end and modified deck cover to look like a typical American 4-seater sports car.

It powered by a 4,700cc supercharged V8 engine and equipped with the BorgWarner Flight-O-Matic automatic transmission, power brakes and power steering to ensure effortless high-speed cruising ability.
1958 Packard Hawk's rear end featured with dual antennas and dual exhausts. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
Overall its appearance is indeed similar to the Studebaker Golden Hawk, with a slight difference, among others, that, if the Golden Hawk has a Mercedes-Benz-style front grille, the Packard Hawk has a wide and low opening just above the front bumper and covers the entire width of the car underneath and the top has a sloping nose and hood reminiscent of 1953 Studebakers, but with a Golden Hawk-like bulge.
1958 Packard Hawk has a unique fake spare tire protrusions adorning the rear deck cover. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Lcud02)
While on the back, the sides of the fins are covered with metallic PET film, which gives it a shiny metallic gold look. There are also fake spare tire protrusions adorning the deck cover of the 1953 Studebaker. Then there is a line of 'PACKARD' that appears on the front nose, with the Packard emblem accented in gold embellished along with the Eagle badge on the trunk lid and fins.
The Packard Hawk's interior is covered by genuine leather also featured with full instrumentation in an engine-turned dash. As on early aircraft and custom boats, padded armrests were mounted outside the windows, such a rare touch. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | WIKIPEDIA | MYDREAMCARONLINE | VAULT CLASSIC CARS ]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.