-->
Drop Down MenusCSS Drop Down MenuPure CSS Dropdown Menu
Showing posts with label Sportscar. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sportscar. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 12, 2024

The Pontiac Pursuit: A 1987 Concept Car That Was Decades Ahead

Forgotten ONES - When General Motors decided to cease production of Pontiacs in 2009, many enthusiasts and automotive experts felt the decision was premature. Given the resurgence in the popularity of muscle cars, there was a belief that Pontiac deserved another chance. The brand, in its heyday, introduced a plethora of unique vehicles, including some innovative concept cars. One such notable concept was the Pontiac Pursuit, a car that, despite never reaching mass production, managed to predict future automotive trends with remarkable accuracy.
The Pontiac Pursuit Concept car introduced at the end of 1987, was aptly named "Pursuit" to symbolize its chase towards the elusive future. (Picture from: GMAuthority)
In the 1980s, a combination of factors such as fuel crises, economic instability, and advancements in cybernetics began to significantly influence car design and functionality. It became clear that the future of automobiles would differ vastly from what existed then. Even General Motors, known for its robust and stable vehicle designs, recognized this shift. 
The Pontiac Pursuit was heavily influenced by aerodynamics, a principle that is now prevalent in modern electric cars and hybrids, and inspired the design of General Motors' first production electric car, the GM EV1. (Picture from: Carscoops)
While in the mid-eighties, the Pontiac design studio embarked on a project to envision the car of the future, resulting in the creation of the Pontiac Pursuit concept car. This vehicle, introduced at the end of 1987, was aptly named "Pursuit" to symbolize its chase towards the elusive future. The Pursuit's design was heavily influenced by aerodynamics, a principle that is now prevalent in modern electric cars and hybrids. Interestingly, the Pursuit's silhouette inspired the design of General Motors' first production electric car, the GM EV1. However, the Pursuit's futuristic design was just the beginning of its innovative features.
The Pontiac Pursuit powered by a two-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder engine producing 200 horsepower, a specification that was impressive for its time. (Picture from: Carscoops)
One of the most groundbreaking aspects of the Pursuit was its control system, which eliminated the mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the wheels. Instead, the steering wheel acted as an actuator for electronic-mechanical systems on both the front and rear axles, powered by separate batteries. This meant the Pursuit was equipped with a fully functional drive-by-wire steering system. The driving experience was unlike anything seen before, with the steering wheel requiring only half a turn from lock to lock, a stark contrast to traditional systems.
The Pontiac Pursuit powered by a two-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder engine producing 200 horsepower, a specification that was impressive for its time. (Picture from: Carscoops)
The Pursuit also boasted several luxury features that were ahead of its time. It included air conditioning, rear passenger TVs, and even a built-in child seat, akin to what modern Volvo models offer. The only aspect that seems outdated by today’s standards is its manual transmission, which is now rare in sports coupes.
The Pontiac Pursuit was equipped with a fully functional drive-by-wire steering system, which improved handling and maneuverability. (Picture from: Carscoops)
Under the hood, the Pursuit featured a two-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder engine producing 200 horsepower, a specification that was impressive for its time. Despite these forward-thinking features, Pontiac's lineup in the following years became relatively uninspired. The reason behind this conservative approach by General Motors remains unclear, but it likely stemmed from a reluctance to take risks and a preference for gradual changes over bold innovations.
The Pontiac Pursuit was equipped with a fully functional drive-by-wire steering system, which improved handling and maneuverability. (Picture from: GMAuthority)
Besides its unique "steer by wire" system and aerodynamic design, the 1987 Pontiac Pursuit concept car was a remarkable achievement. It featured a Saginaw system powered by 24-volt electric motors, which improved handling and maneuverability. Its aerodynamic wheel skirts and advanced suspension system further enhanced its performance and fuel efficiency.
The Pontiac Pursuit boasted luxury features ahead of its time, including air conditioning, rear passenger TVs, and a built-in child seat. (Picture from: Carscoops)
Equipped with anti-lock brakes and an all-wheel-drive system, the Pursuit also included advanced traction control to prevent tire spinning. The car’s tires were designed for optimal all-weather performance, and the Getrag 5-speed manual gearbox added to its sporty appeal. Inside, the Pursuit featured a head-up display, fingertip steering controls, and entertainment options for rear passengers.
The Pontiac Pursuit was a visionary concept ahead of its time, influencing modern automotive trends with innovative features and design elements that showcased the potential of future cars. (Picture from: GMAuthority)
In retrospect, the Pontiac Pursuit was a visionary concept that showcased what future cars could be. Its innovative features and design elements were ahead of their time, influencing modern automotive trends. While Pontiac may no longer be in production, the legacy of the Pursuit concept lives on, reminding us of the potential for creativity and forward-thinking in automotive design. | ejx6xnyDCFg |
The Pontiac Pursuit serves as a fascinating glimpse into the future of car design as envisioned in the 1980s. Its innovative features, from drive-by-wire technology to digital dashboards, have become common in today's vehicles. The Pursuit's story is a testament to the importance of bold experimentation and the enduring impact of visionary concepts in shaping the automotive industry. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | GM AUTHORITY | CARSCOOPS | CARSTYLING.RU ]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Tuesday, June 11, 2024

Ferrari 12Cilindri: Evolving Heritage for Modern Excellence

New BREED - Did you know? Ferrari always manages to capture attention with every model they launch, and the Ferrari 12Cilindri is no exception. This stunning vehicle seamlessly blends the futuristic vibes of the 60s and 70s with a sleek, modern design.
The Ferrari 12Cilindri seamlessly blends the futuristic vibes of the 60s and 70s with a sleek, modern design, and is offered in both Coupe and Spider versions. (Picture from: Oto)
This model carries the spirit of the V12 engine that has been the Prancing Horse's trademark for 77 years. With a 6.5-liter V12 engine, evolved from the Ferrari Enzo, the 12Cilindri promises extraordinary performance. The engine boasts a 65-degree angle configuration, with each cylinder featuring a double overhead camshaft and four valves. Essentially, the F140HD engine is a refined version of the F140HC used in the 812 Competizione.
The Ferrari 12Cilindri (pictured in the Coupe model) continues the tradition of the front-engined, V12-powered two-door in Ferrari's lineup, which now also includes a six-cylinder four-door SUV and a plug-in hybrid mid-engine sports car. (Picture from: Oto)
The F140HD engine delivers an impressive 818 hp at 9,250 rpm and a maximum torque of 678 Nm at 7,250 rpm. This power allows the car reachs a top speed of up to 340 km/h, and to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in just 2.9 seconds for the Coupe version.  While the Spider model is slightly slower, requiring 2.95 seconds to hit 100 km/h.  These remarkable stats are even more impressive considering the engine meets Euro 6E emissions regulations.
Inside, the Ferrari 12Cilindri features a 15.6-inch digital instrument panel, a 10.25-inch touchscreen, and an entertainment system with 15 Burmester speakers, all enhancing the car's luxurious and sophisticated feel. (Picture from: Oto)
Embedded in this marvel is the advanced SSC 8.0 technology, an innovative Ferrari dynamic control system that boasts faster learning capabilities and a 10 percent increase in accuracy for estimating vehicle properties in various scenarios. It even claims to measure the level of tire grip with remarkable precision. The tires used are either Michelin Pilot Sport S5 or Goodyear Eagle F1 Supersport, configured at 275/35 at the front and 315/35 at the rear, all wrapped around 21-inch aluminum rims.
The Ferrari 12Cilindri (pictured in the Coupe model), powered by a 6.5-liter V12 F140HD engine, delivers an impressive 818 hp at 9,250 rpm and a maximum torque of 678 Nm at 7,250 rpm. (Picture from: Oto)
Design-wise, the Ferrari 12Cilindri combines the futuristic vibes of the 60s and 70s with an elegant modern concept. Features such as a 15.6-inch digital instrument panel, a 10.25-inch touchscreen, and an entertainment system with 15 Burmester speakers enhance the car's luxurious and sophisticated feel. 
The Ferrari 12Cilindri (pictured in the Spider model) boasts extra tech that makes it 35kg heavier than the slightly longer 812 Superfast. (Picture from: Autocar)
The 12Cilindri is available in both Coupe and Spider hardtop versions, replacing the 812 Superfast. It continues the tradition of the front-engined, V12-powered two-door in Ferrari's lineup, which now also includes a six-cylinder four-door SUV and a plug-in hybrid mid-engine sports car. This model is said to revive the spirit of iconic Ferrari GT V12s like the Lusso and the 275 GTB/4.
The Ferrari 12Cilindri (pictured in Spider model), using a new aluminum alloy for the pistons and has installed a rebalanced and lightweight crankshaft. (Picture from: OtoDriver)
In terms of pricing, the Coupe model of the Ferrari 12Cilindri is offered at around $425,000 or approximately Rp.6.12 billion, while the Spider version is priced at $470,000 or about Rp.6.768 billion. These prices reflect the 12Cilindri's position at the pinnacle of Ferrari's innovation and heritage in the automotive world.
From the harmonious blend of retro and contemporary design elements to the roaring power of its V12 engine, the Ferrari 12Cilindri stands as a testament to Ferrari's enduring commitment to excellence and innovation. Each detail, from its advanced technology to its luxurious interior, underscores why Ferrari remains a leader in the automotive world, continuously setting new standards and inspiring car enthusiasts everywhere. The 12Cilindri isn't just a car; it's a statement of Ferrari's relentless pursuit of perfection and its dedication to pushing the boundaries of automotive engineering. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | FERRARI | CARSCOOPS | AUTOCAR | CARANDDRIVER ]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Monday, June 10, 2024

El Cadillette: A 6.2 Meters, Six-Wheeled Marvel Based on Three Iconic Brands

Weird ONES - In the automotive world, there's always a fascination with vehicles that stand out from the ordinary. Modifying motor vehicles to attract public attention has become a popular trend. These modifications often focus on creating unique appearances that capture the imagination and generate viral moments. One such extraordinary transformation involves turning a classic car into a six-wheeled marvel, combining elements from at least three of the most iconic automotive brands in history.
The 'El Cadillette,' a unique six-wheeled vehicle blending elements of the El Camino, Cadillac, and 1959 Corvette, crafted by HBomb Customs & Classics. (Picture from: Hemmings)
As quoted of Stuff.co.nzHBomb Customs & Classics, a renowned vehicle restoration and customization workshop near Temuka, New Zealand, took on one of its most ambitious projects in its ten-year history. The project began in 2018 when David Blackmore, an Australian gentleman living on the Gold Coast, Australia, tasked the workshop with transforming his classic 1959 Cadillac into something truly unique.  
The 'El Cadillette' project originated from a 1959 hardtop four-door Cadillac. (Picture from: Hemmings)
Originally, Blackmore envisioned a beautiful, classic design inspired by an image drawn by Raymond Picasso. However, he later decided to elevate the project's uniqueness by increasing the car's wheels from four to six. The process of bringing this six-wheeled, 6.2 meters-long orange-colored masterpiece to life was no small feat. 
Car restorer Hadleigh Oudemans (left) from HBomb Customs, along with Frank Spencer and Brendan Anisy, showcase the remarkable length of El Cadillette. (Picture from: Stuff.co.nz)
The partially completed car arrived from Wellington in a container in 2018, and over the following two years, the team at HBomb Customs & Classics worked tirelessly to turn Blackmore's vision into reality, finally completing the project just before Christmas 2020.

The result was the El Cadillette, a stunning fusion of an El Camino, a Cadillac, and a 1959 Corvette. This unique vehicle also features bonnet rockets from a 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air and a "rumble seat" setup behind the cockpit-style cabin.
The initial designs of the car were specifically drawn by Raymond Picasso for the owner before deciding on the rear tandem configuration. (Picture from: Hemmings)
One of the most challenging aspects of the project was designing the "lazy axle" setup for the twin rear wheels, making it a six-wheeled vehicle reminiscent of the FAB 1, the iconic pink car from the 1960s' British science-fiction puppet television series Thunderbirds.
The original four-wheeled design of El Cadillette was based on a 1959 Cadillac flat-top sedan, featuring a powerful 500 cubic inch V8 Cadillac engine. (Picture from: TheVetteBarn)
Throughout the project, Hadleigh Oudemans and his team also modified the wheel arches and created a custom grille using parts from two '59 Corvettes. The exterior was painted in a striking "Lamborghini Orange," while the interior was customized with white and orange crocodile leather.
The front grille of El Cadillette was custom-made using parts taken from two 1959 Corvettes. (Picture from: Hemmings)
Adding to its uniqueness, the six-wheeled car features a clear glass roof, fulfilling a specific request from Blackmore. The team spent significant time sourcing and chasing suitable Cadillac parts for the project. The vehicle is powered by a 500 cubic inch V8 Cadillac engine, ensuring that it has the power to match its striking appearance.
El Cadillette's interior is adorned with a fully custom carbon fiber dash and features special crocodile genuine leather in white and orange on the seats. (Picture from: Hemmings)
Oudemans estimated that the project could eventually cost between $200,000 and $300,000. One of the standout features is the installation of a television in the middle of the spare wheel cover, allowing Blackmore to "park up" and watch 1950s music videos, adding a nostalgic touch to this futuristic vehicle.
Car restorer Hadleigh Oudemans from HBomb Customs describes El Cadillette as the most challenging project he has ever undertaken. (Picture from: WeirdWheels)
The transformation of the 1959 Cadillac into the six-wheeled El Cadillette is a testament to the creativity and craftsmanship of the team at HBomb Customs & ClassicsThis project showcases how innovative modifications can breathe new life into classic cars, turning them into unique works of art that capture the imagination and draw attention wherever they go.
As the El Cadillette cruises the streets (once it is fully built and road-ready), it stands as a shining example of what can be achieved when vision meets skill, and tradition blends with modernity. Unfortunately, we haven't heard any updates about it since then. *** [EKA [15022021] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | HBOMB CUSTOMS & CLASSIC | STUFF.CO.NZ | HEMMINGS | SIXMANIA | CUSTOM RODDER | THEVETTEBARN | WEIRDWHEELS ]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Sunday, June 9, 2024

Iconic 1960s Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT: A Timeless Concept Car

⛔Rare GEMS💣 - The world of concept cars is a fascinating realm where imagination meets engineering prowess, often leading to the creation of vehicles that, while ephemeral, leave an indelible mark on automotive history. These cars typically make a brief but impactful appearance at various auto shows, capturing headlines and the public's imagination before retreating into obscurity. However, some transcend their temporary status and achieve legendary status, particularly those from the 1960s, an era renowned for groundbreaking automotive designs.
The 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT concept car is built to explore the possibility of a Corvair-based sports car and designed by Larry Shinoda , Anatole Lapine, and Paul Dessen. (Picture from: Hagerty)
Among the concept cars of the 1960s, a few stand out for their lasting influence and innovative design. These vehicles were crafted not just as showcases of future possibilities but as statements of style and engineering ingenuity. Car manufacturers of that time saw the value in creating one-off models that could hint at future trends and stir excitement for upcoming releases. One such vehicle that epitomizes this spirit is the Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT, a concept car that has left an enduring legacy.
The 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT concept car was introduced in the early 1960s as a daring exploration of sports car potential based on the Corvair model. (Picture from: ConceptCarz)
The Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT was introduced in the early 1960s as a daring exploration of sports car potential based on the Corvair model. It made a spectacular debut at the Road America 500 race meeting in September 1962, immediately capturing the attention of automotive enthusiasts and industry insiders alike. General Motors described the Monza GT as part of their continuous effort to innovate and test new styling and engineering ideas, even though it was never intended for mass production.
The 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT (XP-777) - Illustration from "Chevrolet Idea Cars - Today's ideas for tomorrow's driving" Foldout. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
The design of the Monza GT was a collaborative effort by Larry Shinoda, Anatole Lapine, and Paul Deesen. They transformed the Chevrolet Corvair platform by shortening it and reconfiguring the layout to feature a mid-engine setup. This was achieved by rotating the Corvair's air-cooled flat-six engine 180 degrees and placing it ahead of the transaxle. This configuration not only improved the car's balance and handling but also gave it a distinctive and futuristic look that still turns heads today.
The 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT concept car has first appeared before the public at the 1963 New York Auto Show. (Picture from: ConceptCarz)
One of the most striking features of the Monza GT was its unique appearance. The car's forward-slanting nose, equipped with four small headlights and the absence of a traditional grille, gave it a fresh and athletic look that stood out from the more extravagant American cars of the previous decade. The clean, taut lines of the body exuded a sense of speed and agility, reflecting a shift towards more refined and performance-oriented design principles.
1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT concept car does not apply the usual doors like most existing cars. To be able to enter the cabin from this 2-seater concept car, you should be opened the whole of the car canopy. (Picture from: ConceptCarz)
Adding to its futuristic allure, the Monza GT featured an innovative canopy-style entry system instead of conventional doors. This meant that the entire canopy of the car had to be lifted to access the interior, a feature that was also seen in another Chevrolet concept, the Corvair Testudo, built by Bertone in 1963. This unique approach to ingress and egress highlighted the car's status as a true concept vehicle, pushing the boundaries of traditional automotive design.
1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT concept car interior has a black dashboard with simple instrument panels and able to accommodate two passengers in its cabin. (Picture from: ConceptCarz)
The Monza GT was first showcased to the public at the 1963 New York Auto Show, where it continued to impress with its technical specifications. It was powered by a modified version of the Corvair's standard engine, a 6-cylinder, 145-cubic inch (2,380 cc) unit equipped with dual carburetors, producing around 102 horsepower. This engine, combined with the car's lightweight and mid-engine layout, promised exciting performance potential.
1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT concept car used a mid-mounted 6-cubic 145-inch inline engine with a capacity of 2,380 cc and is equipped with dual carburetors. (Picture from: ConceptCarz)
Despite the enthusiasm it generated, the Monza GT never made it to the production line. Various factors, including the troubled reputation of the Corvair model at the time, likely contributed to this decision. Nevertheless, the Monza GT remains a beloved icon in automotive history, celebrated for its bold design and innovative engineering.

Today, the Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT is preserved as a testament to the creativity and forward-thinking spirit of its era. It resides at the GM Heritage Center in Sterling Heights, Michigan, where it continues to inspire and captivate visitors. This iconic concept car serves as a reminder of a time when automakers dared to dream big and push the boundaries of what was possible in automotive design.
Visiting the GM Heritage Center offers a rare opportunity to witness this legendary vehicle up close. The Monza GT stands as a beacon of automotive history, representing the ingenuity and vision that have driven the industry forward. For car enthusiasts and historians alike, it is a must-see example of the heights that can be achieved when creativity and engineering excellence converge.

In exploring the story of the Chevrolet Corvair Monza GT, we are reminded of the power of innovation and the enduring impact of visionary design. While many concept cars may fade into obscurity, the Monza GT continues to shine as a symbol of a bygone era of automotive daring and imagination. *** [EKA [31072020] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CONCEPTCARZ | CARSTYLING.RU | HAGERTY ]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Speed and Style: Tojeiro EE-Ford and the Ecurie Ecosse Legacy

Racing Legends - In the world of classic racing cars, there's a gem that often doesn't get the spotlight it deserves—the Tojeiro EE-Ford Endurance Racing Coupe. This beauty from the early 1960s holds a special place in the heart of racing enthusiasts, especially those familiar with the legacy of Ecurie Ecosse, the Scottish racing team founded by David Murray and Wilkie Wilkinson.
The Tojeiro EE-Ford Endurance Racing Coupe, meticulously crafted for the Ecurie Ecosse fleet, bore the hallmark expertise of John Tojeiro, a revered specialist in 1960s competition car construction. (Picture from: BringATrailer)
When David Murray decided to add another racing marvel to the Ecurie Ecosse fleet, he turned to the expertise of John Tojeiro, a renowned specialist in competition car construction. The result? A masterpiece built on the foundation of Tojeiro's Formula Junior chassis, tailored and reinforced to create a formidable rear-engined coupe. The car made its debut on the racing scene in 1962, destined for the iconic Le Mans 24 Hours race.
The Tojeiro EE-Ford Endurance Racing Coupe made its debut on the racing scene in 1962, destined for the iconic Le Mans 24 Hours race. (Picture from: ClassicDriver)
Under the distinctive Ecurie Ecosse colors, two of these beauties were primed for Le Mans glory. However, fate had different plans for each. While one was equipped with a Coventry Climax engine and a Cooper Monaco transmission, its sibling boasted an aluminum 3.5-liter Buick V8 paired with a Corvair transaxle, later upgraded to a powerful 289 Ford engine. These cars weren't just about raw power; they were a blend of artistry and engineering finesse.
The Tojeiro EE-Ford Endurance Racing Coupe was constructed on the basis of Tojeiro's Formula Junior chassis, meticulously tailored and reinforced to birth a formidable rear-engined coupe. (Picture from: BringATrailer)
The journey to Le Mans wasn't without its challenges. With meticulous attention to detail, Stan Sproat, Ecurie Ecosse's best senior mechanic, worked tirelessly to ensure both cars were race-ready. The clock ticked ominously as the transporter embarked on its journey, carrying unpainted cars and a mission fueled by passion and determination.
The interior of the Tojeiro EE-Ford Endurance Racing Coupe exudes a cool vibe but feels somewhat claustrophobic, with modern fire suppression being the only known upgrade amidst a realm of mysteries. (Picture from: BringATrailer)
Despite the last-minute rush, the Tojeiro EE-Ford made its mark at Le Mans, showcasing impressive speed and agility until an unfortunate gearbox issue halted its progress. The season wasn't over yet; the car found itself on the Monza circuit, chasing speed records with Jack Fairman behind the wheel. Although mechanical woes cut the attempt short, the car's potential was evident, hitting a record-breaking 152 mph.
Only two cars were ever built, intended to compete in the 24 hours of Le Mans 1962 under Ecurie Ecosse's colors, yet their destinies took divergent paths. (Picture from: ClassicDriver)
As the seasons unfolded, the Tojeiro EE-Ford continued to mesmerize on the racing circuits. From Jackie Stewart's triumphs to Doug Graham's valiant efforts, each race added a chapter to its storied history. Even a transformation into a spyder variant couldn't dull its shine, as Bill Stein's skillful handling proved at Silverstone and Brands Hatch, surviving a harrowing crash with resilience that mirrored the car's enduring spirit.
The Tojeiro EE-Ford Endurance Racing Coupe was subsequently fully dismantled and entrusted to restoration specialists Crosthwaite & Gardiner, who meticulously rebuilt and reinforced the multi-tubular chassis and integrated its original roof into the overall reconstruction. (Picture from: ClassicDriver)
Today, with the skilled hands of restoration experts such as Crosthwaite & Gardiner, this racing icon continues its legacy. Painstakingly disassembled and rebuilt, retaining its original roof, the Tojeiro EE-Ford stands as a testament to an era where passion and innovation forged legends.
Enthusiasts, beholding this restored marvel, aren't just seeing a car; they're immersed in a narrative of speed, ambition, and the tireless quest for racing supremacy. This essence reverberates in the retro-styled supercar, Ecurie Ecosse LM69, embodying a timeless spirit of automotive excellence. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BONHAM | BRINGATRAILER | PISTONSANDWHEELS | CLASSICDRIVER ]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone

Saturday, June 8, 2024

Meet the Ferrari Uovo: The Unique Egg-Shaped Classic Car

ONE-OFF - Maybe all this time you know Ferraris as sports cars with a sensational and sexy appearance, so you might not recognize the figure of this classic Ferrari car. Indeed, this one-of-a-kind in the world is called Ferrari Uovo, or Ferrari 166MM/212 Export ‘Uovo’ for its full name.
1950 Ferrari 166MM/212 Export ‘Uovo' has shown off at the Goodwood Festival of Speed 2019. (Picture from: Sun)
Ferrari Uovo boasts unique looks and styling, or can be said to be eccentric. This car is a one-off project from an Italian coachbuilder named Carrozzeria Fontana, based on a Ferrari 166MM classic car platform. After it crashed in its first attempt, its original buyers, the Marzotto brothers, decided to rebuild it in this form. The result is a unique car shaped like an egg, or 'Uovo' in Italian.

Sculptor Franco Reggiani was the mastermind behind its special bodywork, creating a shape he likened to that of a plane without wings. This good-looker raced for the first time in 1951 and was powered by a 1.56-liter gasoline engine that produced up to 186 horsepower (138 kilowatts) and had a mileage of more than 341 miles (550 kilometers).
Front three quarter of 1950 Ferrari 166MM/212 Export ‘Uovo.' (Picture from: OtoBlitz)
Armed with aerodynamic bodywork and drivetrain, the Uovo was very competitive and took part in the Mille Miglia and Giro di Sicilia in 1951. The car had the chance to lead the race before it was damaged and ultimately unable to continue.

If at that time Uovo had not experienced severe damage, it is very likely this car would have been the winner in those two prestigious racing events. The results could have been different, potentially leading Ferrari to build more of these cars in the future. Even so, this classic Ferrari remains a historic and iconic car, making it a special model for Ferrari collectors.
Dashboard view of 1950 Ferrari 166MM/212 Export ‘Uovo.' (Picture from: OtoBlitz)
In August 2017, this car was auctioned by RM Sotheby's at an event in Monterey, California. Initially, this car was expected to sell at a price of US $7 million, but it ultimately sold for $4.5 million, making it one of the world's most expensive cars. WOW!😲

The Ferrari Uovo is more than just a unique vehicle; it’s a testament to the innovative spirit of Ferrari and the craftsmanship of Carrozzeria Fontana and Franco Reggiani. Its distinctive design and racing pedigree make it a standout in the history of automotive engineering. Even after several decades, the Uovo continues to captivate car enthusiasts and collectors alike.
Rear right side view of 1950 Ferrari 166MM/212 Export ‘Uovo.' (Picture from: OtoBlitz)
Owning a piece of history like the Ferrari Uovo is a dream for many, and its story continues to inspire those passionate about classic cars and racing heritage. The legacy of the Uovo lives on, reminding us of the timeless allure of Ferrari and the incredible feats of engineering that have defined the brand over the years.
As we look back on the remarkable journey of the Ferrari Uovo, it’s clear that this car represents more than just a mode of transportation. It embodies the passion, creativity, and relentless pursuit of excellence that have come to define Ferrari. This unique vehicle will always be celebrated as a remarkable chapter in the storied history of one of the world’s most iconic automotive manufacturers. *** [EKA [16072019] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SUN | INDEPENDENT ]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone