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Sunday, January 10, 2021

Born to be Collectible

It is not something extraordinary if there are cars produced for collection items. This can happen because of the limited amount of production or caused by other things such as the factory stopping production, and so on.
1958 Packard Hawk was distinguished in key ways by its designer, with a fiberglass front end and modified deck cover to look like a typical American 4-seater sports car. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
And at the end of the 1950s there were car models that were produced in a very short time and then instantly became collectibles. The car was a typical American sports car called the Packard Hawk born in 1958 which back then positioned as an alternative model to the market-favorite Ford Thunderbird, which offered a new version in 1958 as well.
Packard Hawk is appeared beautifully finished in Parchment white with gold trim on the tailfin. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Lcud02)
As we know Packard was no longer existed after 1958 and never before ventured into the realm of sports cars, so the Packard Hawk became a production car for just one year as well as one of the car models produced by the American car manufacturer Studebaker and rebadged as the Packard model with only 588 units ever came off the assembly line.
1958 Packard Hawk is the essence of the 1950’s beauty, with flashy trim, tailfins, a hardtop, and a powerful supercharged engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
Well, it is known that this model was built on a Duncan McRae's design specifically made to be the personal sports car of Roy T. Hurley, president of Curtiss-Wright Corporation, who took over the Packard factory in 1953 due to doesn't want to see the Packard big-name corporate to collapse, and he continued the Packard production in Detroit for three years while acquiring the flagging Studebaker Corp. in South Bend, Indiana.
1958 Packard Hawk cabin covered by a beautiful genuine leather with full instrumentation in an engine-turned dash. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
In 1957, Packard moved to the Studebaker facility. Actually, at the time Packard was left only the suck brand with the sale numbers continued to slump followed its bad reputation and was booed by the Packard lovers due to the cheaper cars built in the mid-1950s and called as "Packardbakers."
1958 Packard Hawk uses a Studebaker 289  V-8 engine coupled with McCulloch supercharger. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
To restore Packard's reputation for quality, Hurley decided to use his custom-built two-door hardtop as a prototype of the 1958 Hawk and touted as the "Family Sports Car," the Hawk actually began production in January 1957.
1958 Packard Hawk has a wide and low opening just above the front bumper and covers the entire width of the car underneath and the top has a sloping nose and hood. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
Although similar-looking to Studebaker's 1957 tail-finned Golden Hawk, the Packard Hawk was distinguished in key ways by its designer, with a fiberglass front end and modified deck cover to look like a typical American 4-seater sports car.

It powered by a 4,700cc supercharged V8 engine and equipped with the BorgWarner Flight-O-Matic automatic transmission, power brakes and power steering to ensure effortless high-speed cruising ability.
1958 Packard Hawk's rear end featured with dual antennas and dual exhausts. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MuDcKE)
Overall its appearance is indeed similar to the Studebaker Golden Hawk, with a slight difference, among others, that, if the Golden Hawk has a Mercedes-Benz-style front grille, the Packard Hawk has a wide and low opening just above the front bumper and covers the entire width of the car underneath and the top has a sloping nose and hood reminiscent of 1953 Studebakers, but with a Golden Hawk-like bulge.
1958 Packard Hawk has a unique fake spare tire protrusions adorning the rear deck cover. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Lcud02)
While on the back, the sides of the fins are covered with metallic PET film, which gives it a shiny metallic gold look. There are also fake spare tire protrusions adorning the deck cover of the 1953 Studebaker. Then there is a line of 'PACKARD' that appears on the front nose, with the Packard emblem accented in gold embellished along with the Eagle badge on the trunk lid and fins.
The Packard Hawk's interior is covered by genuine leather also featured with full instrumentation in an engine-turned dash. As on early aircraft and custom boats, padded armrests were mounted outside the windows, such a rare touch. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | WIKIPEDIA | MYDREAMCARONLINE | VAULT CLASSIC CARS ]
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