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Wednesday, January 13, 2021

The Studebaker Sceptre had unique electric razor shaped front-grille

The existence of concept cars in the world's automotive is not always made by car manufacturers but also made by independent automotive designers who are then submitted to the car manufacturers to be used as production models. Among the many concept cars created by automotive designers that had circulated in the 1960s, it turns out that the Studebaker Sceptre was able to give a little impression.
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2L4xzTa)
The Studebaker
Sceptre is one of a series of cars made and proposed by Brooks Stevens, a renowned Milwaukee industrial designer in 1962-1963 to replace the old Studebaker's product line. The Scepter concept car design results were given to the Studebaker's CEO Sherwood Egbert and company management in April 1963 as the replacement of 1966 Studebaker Gran Turismo Hawk, which also happened to be a Brooks Stevens design.
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3pNvD03)
But unfortunately the timing was not right, because the American automotive company was in poor condition and was on the verge of bankruptcy. As we know, that Studebaker almost lost all options to survive in the spring of 1963, and was forced to seal off all of its factory doors before the end of that year. It is a shame that the striking Sceptre was never came out of the Studebaker's assembly line at the South Bend factory. Indeed, no one could guarantee at the time whether the 1966 Studebaker Sceptre presence would bring success and save the company at the same time
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Los8OG)
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Stevens had the only Sceptre prototype built by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano, a little-known and short-lived (only five years, 1962-1966) but highly regarded Italian coachbuilder that was also responsible for Virgil Exner’s stunning Mercer Cobra. The Italian coachbuilder company directed by Pietro Sibona, formerly of Ghia, and brothers Elio and Emilio Basano was made the beautifully detailed prototype on the Studebaker chassis for $16,000 (a remarkable price in those days).
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3pNvD03)
As qouted of the Macsmotorcitygarage, the observers noted that the Brooks Stevens's automotive designs could range from the basic to the baroque. In our opinion, the Sceptre is one of the cleanest and most elegant examples of all, with simple visual elements that cleverly complement one another. It shows on the distinctive front end featuring an electric-razor grille with a Sylvania Light Bar system to illuminate the roadway.
1962 Studebaker Sceptre Concept designed by Brooks Stevens and bodied by Turin Carrozzeria Sibona-Basano. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Los8OG)
While the rear styling includes an ingenious and useful clamshell trunk opening, and the broad C-pillar, with polarizing glass panels, are touted as a stylized representation of the formal roof that Stevens uses on the GT Hawk and his reskinned Brazilian Aero Willys. And the Sylvania light bar is also used at the rear-end, but is hidden behind a full-width ruby plastic lens.

Then the cabin is brought a modern Italian style touche, combined with black and gold vinyl trim and a large, airy greenhouse flooded with light. The thermometer-type speedometer and instrument panels are housed in a plastic pod at the top of the dashboard, while the passenger side features a large vanity area with folding mirror.
Although, eventually the Studebaker Corporation failed to survive as a carmaker, while on the opposite, the one-off Sceptre prototype managed to survive. Fortunately, the car resided in the Brooks Stevens Automotive Museum in Mequon, Wisconsin for many years, and these days can be seen at the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend, Indiana. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | MACSMOTORCITYGARAGE.COM ]
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