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Showing posts with label Minicar. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Minicar. Show all posts

Thursday, May 26, 2022

A unique Austrian-made Felber Autoroller T 400 of the 1950s

~Unique ONE~ When the world was still recovering shortly after the end of the war that was so painful and engulfed almost around the globe. That's when the development and presence of small, cheap and fuel-efficient vehicles to be a kind of excellent helping angels to the impoverished the postwar Europeans and attracted those who could not afford to buy "real" cars. Over time, their popularity spiked after the Suez Crisis of 1956, when the price of oil rose steeply.
An early model of the Felber Autoroller T 400 produced in the 1953 featured with cycle-type mudguards that swivelled with the front wheels. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
It looks like the idea of the cheap and fuel-efficient microcar seems to have come to the peak of its line, just as motorcycles in the 1950s. Like the plague, the development of the microcar quickly spread to all corners of Europe. At that time there were so many brands and models appearing, let's say that in Germany there was the Messerschmitt KR 175, BMW Isetta, Heinkel Cabin and Zündapp Janus. Meanwhile, the Italian giant Piaggio launched the Vespa 400. Then in England there is the Scootacar, Peel P50, Bond Bug, and many others
The 2nd model of the Felber Autoroller T 400 produced in the 1953 featured with fixed wheel fenders in the front. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
Like the most countries in the Europe, Austria also experienced a severe economic setback as a result of the destruction of many industrial facilities and infrastructure during the war. And turn out from the Austrian automotive industry business players back in the 1950s also had time to bring up microcar model called the Felber Autoroller T 400.
The Felber Autoroller T 400 (in pictured is the 2nd model) had an unusual seating arrangement, with a small child-sized seat behind the driver on the left and a conventional passenger seat diagonally behind and to the right. (Picture from: Flickr)
We first seen the such vehicle on the Quirky Rides status on Twitter, which then invites our interest to find out more about it. The mentioned microcar produced by Felber & Co is a well-known manufacturer of motorcycle sidecars based in Vienna, Austria ranging from 1952 to 1953, and about 400 units were built in two versions, all of which were painted in light green color using a standard paint for machinery because considered more cheaper than regular car paint.
The Felber Autoroller T 400 (in pictured is the 2nd model) is powered by a rear-mounted 398 cc Rotax two cylinder two stroke opposed twin engine capable spew power of 15 horsepower. (Picture from: Fahrzeugbilder.de)
The Autoroller was designed by Ernst Marold, in which the early models had cycle-type mudguards that swivelled with the front wheels, later models had fixed wings. The Austrian-made three-wheeled microcar powered by a rear-mounted 398 cc Rotax two cylinder two stroke opposed twin engine capable spew power of 15 horsepower (11 kW).
The Felber Autoroller T 400 (in pictured is the 1st model of 1953) is produced ranging from 1952 to 1953, and all of which were painted in light green color using a standard paint for machinery. (Picture from: VroomVroom)
Uniquely, the microcar had an unusual seating arrangement, with a small child-sized seat behind the driver on the left and a conventional passenger seat diagonally behind and to the right. As quoted of Wikipedia, once upon the time there're remarkable Felber Autoroller T400 troupe caused a stir when accompanying the wedding limousine of Ernst Marold in front of the Karlskirche in the Viennese City centre in 1954.

Unfortunately, this car manufacturing proved to be uncompetitive, after the liberalization of car imports to Austria came into effect in 1954. So that the company then switched to producing industrial washing machines, in addition to being the soles and distributor of cars from Heinkel, Trojan, Spatz and Reliant.
The Felber Möve 101 is built by specialist coachbuilding company Hofmann & Moldrich in Vienna who build upon them the egg-shaped body out of 0.8 mm aluminum plate as many as twelve units back in 1954. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
Besides the Autoroller T400 model, it turns out that about twelve rolling chassis were sent to the specialist coachbuilding company Hofmann & Moldrich in Vienna who build upon them the egg-shaped body out of 0.8 mm aluminum plate called the Felber Möve 101, and the only-one car existed today is sat on display at the car museum in Aspang in Lower-Austria.
Reportedly, there are 4 units of Autoroller T400s survived today, consisting two units are seen on display at the RRR scooter and microcar museum in Eggenburg, Austria. A third one is under restoration in Serbia near to the Hungarian border (maybe it's been restored now) and another one in Bavaria.
The Fusion Flea, a single-seater futuristic fictional microcar that appears in the Fallout 4 game (in 1:18 scaled model). (Picture from: Quirky Rides)
Out of context, our curiosity has not dried yet, the temptation appears again, when from another Quirky Rides's status we also found a unique vehicle that at first glance resembles the Fellber Autoroller T400 known as the Fusion Flea, a single-seater futuristic fictional microcar that appears in the Fallout 4 game (in 1:18 scaled model). Thankfully it's not a real microcar, so it's possible for us to be one of the lucky owner. If You wanna have one, plz come  here to see it. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | WIKIPEDIA | QUIRKY RIDES | BOOK.GOOGLE  | THEWANDCOMPANY ]
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Friday, May 13, 2022

A classic strange cyclops-looked three-wheeler made in Japan

~What Do U Think About IT~ Well on this occasion we will talk about a tiny unique classic vehicle made by a Japanese car maker of the 1950s called Fuji Cabin Model 5A. At first glance, this three-wheeled vehicle has a unique cyclops-like appearance (in modern day might be similar to Mike Wazowski, a main character of the Disney-Pixar's Monsters, Inc. animated series) if we've seen from front.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A three-wheeled vehicle has a unique look similar to a main character in Monsters, Inc. animated series named Mike Wazowski if seen from the front. (Picture from: CarStyling.ru)
The such type of vehicle story began shortly after the country's defeat in World War 2 is believed that was one of the Japan's companies effort to survive. Well, this effort is also what the Diesel Automobile Manufacturing Company done after its car-making division divided into the Hino truck and Isuzu car manufacturing businesses while the aviation division became Hitachi Aviation in March 1946.
This is the Fuji Cabin Model 5A of the 1950s worthy to be crowned as the most unique look three-wheeler ever made by Japanese company. (Picture from: CarStyling.ru)
In that time developing new aviation technology was strictly forbidden by the Allies, as it was considered a war industry. So Hitachi Aviation, as well as other aircraft companies, tried to survive in non-war-related industries. The company subsequently changed its name to the Tokyo Gas and Electric Manufacturing Company in 1952, and began producing 60cc engines for motorbikes and had established itself as an engine producer of mainly small two-stroke engines.
The Fuji Cabin three-wheeled vehicle designed by Ryuichi Tomiya, and appeared for the first time at the 1955 Tokyo Motor Show. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
Then it merged with a Tokyo-based manufacturing company, Fuji Toshuda Motors of Tokyo and started to build their own motorcycles under the names of Fuji Motor and Gasuden FMC, besides supplied engines to other motorcycle makers. As time goes by, the company is decided to produce a kind of scooter with the roof or what we've known later as a micro car.
The Suminoe Flying Feather, an early 350cc kei-car designed by Ryuichi Tomiya for Suminoe Manufacturing back in 1954. (Picture from: Flickr-MrScharroo)
The mentioned micro cars was designed by Ryuichi Tomiya whose before the war had been in charge of body design at Nissan Motors, and afterwards he was responsible for the design of the Suminoe Flying Feather for Suminoe Manufacturing, of which 150 examples were built between 1954 and 1955. His work was highly respected, which later made him known as the 'Leonardo da Vinci of Japan'.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A has a glassfibre bodyshell built on monocoque construction and also equipped with a single headlight, strengthened by a full-length tunnel bringing cooling air directly to the engine. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
And the Tomiya's masterpiece is the Fuji Cabin appeared for the first time at the 1955 Tokyo Motor Show as a streamlined two-seater three-wheeled coupé, and powered by a 122cc single-cylinder Gasuden scooter two-stroke engine with kick start. The unique look vehicle has a glassfibre bodyshell built on monocoque construction and also equipped with a single headlight, strengthened by a full-length tunnel bringing cooling air directly to the engine. 
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A appears to have been designed only to be driven by those of small stature like many of the Japanese at the time, as the car's interior was ludicrously cramped. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
So that when viewed from the front it looks like a creature of Greek mythology, the cyclops. While at rear, there were two rounded beetle-wing lids providing access to the motor and allowing warm air to exit. At first there was a single door on the left, but later cars got one for each side.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A is powered by powered by a 122cc single-cylinder Gasuden scooter two-stroke engine with kick start. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A appears to have been designed only to be driven by those of small stature like many of the Japanese at the time, as the car's interior was ludicrously cramped, with far too much effort required to climb over the central tunnel to get into the staggered driver’s seat.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A three-wheeled vehicle is a fairly good product with a sturdy construction, but also has a poor quality of bodyshell due to the maker having lack experience working with glassfibre. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
Unlike ordinary cars, the Fuji Cabin is controlled by a set of handlebars positioned close to the driver's seat for comfort, and is equipped with a small but well-engineered transmission system that incorporates a reverse gear; something unusual for a typical Western-scooter engined microcar. At that time Fuji Cabin three-wheeled vehicle was planned to be made as many as 400-500 per month, but in fact only 85 units were made all during its short production period from 1957 to 1958.
In general, the Fuji Cabin Model 5A is a fairly good product with a sturdy construction, but that doesn't mean there are no drawbacks, it's because the makers having lack experience working with glassfibre, so its bodyshell has poor quality. Besides that its sale was not a success partly because considered to be an expensive vehicle and also Fuji had no experience of marketing.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops......*** [EKA [09012015] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BELOW THE RADAR | CARSTYLING.RU | ROAD&TRACK | FANDOM ]
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Friday, February 25, 2022

Frank Brogan, a humble inventor from Cincinati with nearly 1,000 vehicle creations

~Humble Inventor~ Since the beginning of the development of motorized vehicles, it seems that the existence of minimal motoring (small, no-frills, basic transportation) has never satisfied the American automobilist. In 1912, development of the cyclecar as a simple vehicle began in Europe and quickly spread to the United States, where more than 200 manufacturers grew and shriveled within 18 months. After Ford stopped producing the Model T in 1927, start-ups like Martin, Littlemac, American Austin, and Bantama tried to fill the economy car void. However, people prefer large used cars over small ones.
Here's a sleek 1946 Brogan Doodlebug looked like an escapee from an amusement park.. (Picture from: TimAlderman)
But during World War 2 the supply of reliable used vehicles dwindled, but not with the creativity of individual automotive enthusiasts in creating simple and compact vehicles. One who were highly creatives such Frank Brogan believed attitudes would change. And through the B&B Specialty Co., his-owned company based in Rossmoyne, Ohio, primarily manufactures screws, fasteners, and other machine products. Besides that he also created a lightweight Brogan Foldable Monoplane that can be towed from the airport to the owner's house for storage in the garage. 

Then he also had time to design a scooter for his daughter, and in 1944, he was asked by his wife to design a small car that could be used to make shopping tasks easier for women whose husbands took their primary vehicles to work. So, Frank Brogan then engineered a small and sleek vehicle for 2 passengers called the Brogan Doodlebug. Due to its unique name, it is most likely taken from a small insect called the doodlebug. This vehicle features a very sleek steel body with the headlights and windshield posts seamlessly blended in. Furthermore, the open-top, doorless three-wheeled vehicle is about 96 inches long and has a wheelbase of about 66 inches, and can be rotated to its own length. 
Frank Brogan’s creations were highly creative but marginally marketable. (Picture from: TheOldMotor)
The vehicle is powered by an engine mounted on the rear. It is also mentioned that the engine installed in this compact car can be chosen by the buyer, at that time two choices were provided, namely the one-cylinder Briggs & Stratton engines or the Onan air-cooled two-cylinder. The Brogan Doodlebug can reach a top speed of 45 mph and travel nearly 70 miles on a gallon of gasoline.

Brogan's tiny Doodlebug vehicle is built specifically for women, so he makes sure it's easy to operate and maintainance. Gear-shifting was automated using a mercury-actuated system similar to fluid drive, which eliminated the clutch pedal. Replacing the hidden front tire simply required popping out the grille and unscrewing two bolts. The engine was removed quickly, by raising the rear deck cover, remove the three pins, remove the gas line, and lift the engine from its position next to the five-gallon fuel tank and battery. Frank Brogan refered an October 1944 clipping from The Washington Post, which featured Ray Russell’s Gadabout in his patent application.
B & B Specialty Company built and sold hundreds of Brogan-Cycles. (Picture from: TheOldMotor)
After the Doodlebug appeared in popular national-wide newspapers and magazines, Brogan received an average of 200 postcards and letters each month covering purchase and distribution requests that came from across the United States and about 20 foreign countries. At that time Brogan made 30 Doodlebugs by hand and sold them for $400 each before realizing that he was actually losing about $100 for each the car he produced.😯 Tooling for mass production required $150,000 which he didn't have, so he suspended the Doodlebug sales.

Instead, he used the same chassis design for the three-wheeled Errand Boy delivery scooter, and developed the four-wheeled Brogan-Truck pickup and delivery van. The Brogan-Trucks feature one steerable wheel at the front and three independent wheels at the rear with power transferred via a chain to the center rear wheel. The odd configuration eliminates the need for expensive differentials. The price of the Brogan-Truck starts at $450, and at the time Frank Brogan managed to sell over 200 units. But he still wanted to build a passenger car.
1951 Broganette Ice Cream Truck, and Roadster that has doors fold down. (Picture from: TheOldMotor)
As quoted from The OldMotor, in 1951, B&B Specialty Co. introduced the $500-priced Broganette Roadster powered by a two-cylinder Onan engine as the answer to the demand for small and cheap cars. At that time he managed to sell less than a dozen of these vehicles before starting to modify the design with different bumpers, trim and fenders. He completed 50 more before losing a nearly half-dozen others in a fire-blazes that destroyed his factory in 1958.

Three months later he managed to reorganize his company in Cincinati which became known as B&B Manufacturing by employing around 16 workers, the company is back in producing scooters and golf carts. The company was also among the first to manufacture go-carts, by offering the Twin-B Runabout and Hornet.
Ten-horsepower Doodlebug rolled on a 66-inch wheelbase. (Picture from: TheOldMotor)
Frank Brogan finally sold his shop in 1959, but he continued to occupy the corner of the building that produced his last two-seater small car called the Brogan Street-Cart. As the name suggests, the Street-Cart is meant for driving around the city. All the features installed on his small car were attempted to meet the regulations that existed in America at that time, such as front and rear bumpers, a brake on each rear wheel, headlights, taillights, turn signals, and a horn.
Frank Brogan made 30 Doodlebugs by hand and sold them for $400 each before realizing that he was actually losing about $100 for each the car he produced. (Picture from: TheOldMotor)
The tubular Street-Cart frame is enveloped by a simple sheet metal body from which a pair of small headlights flared above angular fenders; the engine is enclosed in a perforated aluminum rear deck. Uniquely, the small car is claimed to be able to reach a top speed of 35 mph using small wheels like those usually attached for a lawnmower or a child’s coaster wagon. Brogan only sold about 23 Street-Carts before he passed away in 1974.😢

In all, Frank Brogan had made nearly 1,000 miniature cars, trucks, bicycles, and wagons. The variety of vehicles launched from his humble block-and-frame machine shop has made him a celebrity in and around Cincinnati. But his refusal to perfect or advertise his innovative products widely is preventing him from reaching a wider audience and reaching his full potential as a small passenger vehicle manufacturer. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | THEOLDMOTOR | ATLASOBSCURA | TIMALDERMAN ]
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Thursday, December 16, 2021

Wow, Lexus has a fancy hydrogen-fueled ATV

~Fancy ATV~ Lexus, which has been known to this day as one of the world-class car brands, whose production line is usually filled with fancy SUV and sedan models. And now the brand seems to want to give a surprise by introducing a hydrogen-powered ATV concept that's a completely different car came out of Lexus as usual.
Of all the concepts we expected from Lexus, this Lexus ROV Concept was definitely not one of them. (Picture from: KabarOto)
As quoted of the Lexus official website, the company-made ATV was introduced in concept form and called the Lexus ROV (Recreational Off-highway Vehicle). This is the result of the design of Lexus Europe. According to the automaker, this is a unique concept car, emission-free, and will be fun to use maneuvering in off-road terrain.

In terms of design, this car uses a body wrapped in bronze color, as well as Lexus characteristic LED lights with sharp curves for both the front and rear lights, plus an LED bar at the top to help the lighting system while run in dark condition.
The Lexus ROV concept seeks to bring Lexus' build quality and engineering to the utility task vehicle market. (Picture from: KabarOto)
The Lexus ROV is indeed designed for off-road purpose and built on a tubular chassis, for that the suspension was created much stronger, along with special off-road tires, and has a cage that can protect the passengers inside.
The Lexus ROV's cabin is quite luxurious, starting from the leather-wrapped bucket seats and four-point seat belts. (Picture from: KabarOto)
While on its cabin,  although it is not as luxurious as a Lexus' sedan or SUV models as usual. But for a buggy-kind of car, the Lexus ROV's cabin is quite luxurious, starting from the leather-wrapped bucket seats and four-point seat belts. Then there are several carbon panels on the dashboard, the steering wheel also has a paddle shift setting, the speedometer still uses analog and a small MID screen next to it. While in the middle panel is the place for regulating lights, transmission levers, drive settings, and handbrake levers.

And for the drivetrain, the automaker provides the best innovations that are unique and environmentally friendly for it. The Lexus ROV is carrying a 1.0-liter hydrogen-powered engine that works like a gasoline engine. But what makes the difference is a high pressure tank for compressed hydrogen which is delivered precisely by a direct hydrogen injector. How the engine works almost the same as the Toyota GR Yaris hydrogen, and the ROV emits almost no emissions at all.
The typical performance UTV stuff is present on the Lexus ROV Concept, like long-travel suspension. (Picture from: KabarOto)
"The Lexus ROV is our passion to thrive in the wild and meet the needs of consumers who are thirsty for adventure. As a concept car, the Lexus ROV also continues to prioritize lifestyle with continuous research in new technologies," said Head of Lexus Europe, Spiros Fotinos.
Indeed, so far Lexus has not explained when this cutie ATV will actually be realized or enter the production line. However, this ATV concept is considered to bring somekind of refreshment to the Lexus brand, because it's different from the concept car that has been shown before. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | LEXUS | CNET ]
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Friday, November 26, 2021

A toaster-shaped smart Toyota of the 2000s

~MOst WeirdToyota in its work in the world of the automotive industry as one of the largest manufacturers in the world, actually has produced many motor vehicles. Well, among the many vehicles made by The Japanese auto-giant, there are also many unique and strangely shaped motor vehicles which sometimes makes us frown while asking ourselves, 'how can the big-company like Toyota make such strange vehicle?'
This weird shaped car called the Toyota POD Concept was made by Toyota in early of 2000s. (Picture from: JuraganMobilBekas Mixed by: Eka)
That thing spontaneous crossed our minds when seen these two unique four-wheeled vehicles of Toyota in the status of Quirky Rides on Twitter some time ago. Uniquely, these two vehicles were made by Toyota in early of 2000s. Initially, we've had thought that the Japanese manufacturer engineers might be experienced déjà vu or even brain cramps when making those vehicles (Ups, sorry).💨 Before you feel more curious about those vehicles, come on let's see below!
This weird shaped car called the Toyota POD Concept is built by Toyota in collaboration with the compatriot electronics company Sony and is introduced first in the 2001 Tokyo Motor Show. (Picture from: JuraganMobilBekas)
Previously we had discussed the Toyota WiLL VI and the next weird-shaped car called the Toyota POD Concept (might be some of you seen it like a toaster). It is a future concept car was built by Toyota in collaboration with the compatriot electronics company Sony and is featured with an artificial intelligence system that makes it appear more personal. By such artificial intelligence system as if could be made the Toyota POD seem alive.
This Toyota POD Concept is featured with an artificial intelligence system that makes it appear more personal. (Picture from: JuraganMobilBekas)
How can, there many advanced features inside the car, such the screen with various displays generated by Sony-software, so it can create shopping lists, play music and radio. Even the car can also judge the attitudes and moods of drivers based on their reactions and how they drive, also can offer suggestions on how to improve their mood at the time. 
This Toyota POD Concept features a hands only 'drive-by-wire' control system enabling steering, braking and acceleration to be operated through a single controller. (Picture from: JuraganMobilBekas)
Besides that, the seats inside the car's cabin are made in such a way as a high-cozy seat that can be rotated freely. While on the exterior, the Toyota POD Concept can express its own feelings by colored LEDs (red as angry, yellow as happy, blue as sad) as well as antennae and which can be wagged, like a dog's tail.
The Toyota POD Concept's cabin are made in such a way as a high-cozy seat that can be rotated freely. (Picture from: JuraganMobilBekas)
The car also features a hands only 'drive-by-wire' control system enabling steering, braking and acceleration to be operated through a single controller. However, the automaker did not provide any information about the drivetrain and other related technical data, we assumed the POD concept car is driven by an electric motor.
This unique car is first introduced at the 2001 Tokyo Motor Show. As we've mentioned before, the PODs were designed some kind of your pet on wheels in the future, sadly never get into the Toyota's production lines.😒 *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | WIKIPEDIA | OLDCONCEPTCARS | CARTHROTTLE | ULTIMATESPECS | TOYOTA UK MAGAZINE ]
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Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Had you ever seen these weird-shaped tiny Toyotas of the 2000s?

~MOst Weird~ Toyota in its work in the world of the automotive industry as one of the largest manufacturers in the world, actually has produced many motor vehicles in various types, ranging from small to large ones. Well, among the many vehicles made by The Japanese auto-giant, there are also many unique and strangely shaped motor vehicles which sometimes makes us frown while asking ourselves, 'how can the big-company like Toyota make such strange vehicle?'
This weird shaped car called Toyota WiLL VI was made by Toyota in early of 2000s. (Picture from: UltimateSpecs. Mixed by: Eka)
That thing spontaneous crossed our minds when seen these two unique four-wheeled vehicles of Toyota in the status of Quirky Rides on Twitter some time ago. Uniquely, these two vehicles were made by Toyota in early of 2000s. Initially, we've had thought that the Japanese manufacturer engineers might be experienced déjà vu or even brain cramps when making those vehicles (Ups, sorry).💨 Before you feel more curious about those vehicles, come on let's see below!
The Toyota WiLL VI is built by Toyota in collaboration with several leading Japanese companies in early of 2000s. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
We start with the Toyota WiLL VI which has a design appearance that is no less unique than the legendary German's VW Beetle. It was a car that produced by the Japanese manufacturer in a fairly short time, ranging from 2000 to 2001 in limited quantities and marketed exclusively in Japan only. That's no wonder, if you've never heard about the WiLL VI before.
This Toyota WiLL VI applies a symmetrical design full of converging planes and expressive angles, with distinctive curves along the sides and inverted-angle rear windows that created a silhouette of the horse-drawn carriages of the past. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
Uniquely within the car you would not found a single Toyota logos both on the interior and exterior, because it was the result of an odd joint marketing project between a handful of leading Japanese companies like Asahi Breweries (beer), Panasonic (fax machines, Minidisc players and much more besides), Ezaki Glico (candy), the Kinki Nippon Tourist Company (holiday tours), Kao (air fresheners) and Kokuyo (stationary) and off-course Toyota being the only vehicle manufacturer among them. 
This Toyota WiLL VI was produced with the aim of creating a wide range of WiLL branded products that appeal to the individuality and preferences of the millennial generation as a new generation of consumers . (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
As quoted of Toyota Uk Magazine, this car was produced with the aim of creating a wide range of WiLL branded products that appeal to the individuality and preferences of the millennial generation as a new generation of consumers. And the WiLL VI (pronounced 'vee-eye') is Toyota's opening contribution to this collection and communicates the fun and authentic qualities of the WiLL brand by combining fashionable neo-retro styling with cutting-edge driving performance.
Inside the Toyota WiLL VI, the shifters placed on the steering column, so the automaker doesn't have to bother with the lower center console, allowing for the installation of a bench-style front seat arrangement . (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
For the car's appearance, Toyota applies a symmetrical design full of converging planes and expressive angles, with distinctive curves along the sides and inverted-angle rear windows that created a silhouette officially described as ‘reminiscent of the horse-drawn carriages of the past.' The front and rear were almost identical in appearance and shaped to form a friendly face, while the blistered arches and 15-inch wheels give the design a strong feeling of stability.
This weird shaped Toyota WiLL VI is powered by the supermini’s more powerful 88PS 2NZ-FE 1.3-litre 16v engine, driving the front wheels via a four-speed automatic gearbox. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
As quoted from CarThrottle, the WiLL VI is delivered under the promise of responsive performance underpinned by a platform and powertrain taken directly from the first-generation Toyota Vitz (Yaris), which had just scooped the honour of Japanese Car of the Year at the time. It is powered by the supermini’s more powerful 88PS 2NZ-FE 1.3-litre 16v engine, driving the front wheels via a four-speed automatic gearbox (that's a perfect combination that achieved class-leading fuel economy at the time).
For the sake of practicality in the car's cabin, Toyota has placed shifters on the steering column, so the automaker doesn't have to bother with the lower center console, allowing for the installation of a bench-style front seat arrangement. Meanwhile, the instrument cluster is positioned in the middle of the thick dashboard.

Unfortunately the WiLL VI failed to make much of an impact when it went on sale, so it was produced in less than two years. Eventually Toyota replaced it with the less-odd-looking Toyota WiLL Cypha in early 2002, while also producing a larger Corolla-based VS. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CARTHROTTLE | ULTIMATESPECS | TOYOTA UK MAGAZINE ]
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