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Sunday, December 20, 2020

Conceived as a racy speedster, and ended as a roadworthy convertible

As we all know, in the 1950s to 1960s, the world's automotive industry players competed with each other to attract the attention of customers and then buy their production cars. There're various ways have been done including by making several exhibition cars intended to lead public opinion regarding the technological advances they have achieved at that time and create trends so that they have the opportunity to dominate the automotive market.
The first appearence of 1961 Pontiac Tempest Monte Carlo Concept Car. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3gQ6lLo)
And the follows beautiful car is one of the few concept cars actually made to drive. It's just been completely sorted and ready for a show event or a long haul trip. Besides, it is one of the few General Motors concept cars that is truly road-worthy, and known as Pontiac Tempest Monte Carlo Concept Car
which is also known to have experienced dramatic make over shortly after it been born.
The first appearence of 1961 Pontiac Tempest Monte Carlo Concept Car. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3r1qMtx)
Initally, it made in 1961 as a naughty speedster in the General Motors styling studios directed by Bill Mitchell, GM's head of design at the time. The Monte Carlo is based on the standard '61 Tempest production car, which has been shortened about one foot to create a two-seat roadster. Upon completion, the Monte Carlo concept car was a hit at various auto shows and major road racing events.
The first appearence of 1961 Pontiac Tempest Monte Carlo Concept Car. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3gQ6lLo)
Not infrequently, it made the concept car has to share the spotlight with the Chevrolet Corvair Sebring Spyder, another GM's cool show car. As quoted from HuntingRidgeMotors.com, the concept car building and developing costs in 1961 is exceeded $250,000 (if converted to today's money, that would equal over $2,000,000). Wow ...!
The final appearence of 1961 Pontiac Tempest Monte Carlo Concept Car. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2KceI8j)
The car had a unique design all of which were part of experimental concepts at the time. Well, the car has a custom made stainless steel cove moldings, specially designed instrumentation including a tachometer, custom racing-inspired bucket seats and a three-spoke wood trimmed sports steering wheel.

Besides that the the concept car figure has a striking and quite unique sight that distinguishes it from other cars available at the time, namely a half-sized windshield and Halibrand Knock Off Wheels, and also equipped with other advanced features, such as fitted with an optional soft top, full windshield, roll up windows, included wiper motor and everything else needed for daily use.
The final appearence of 1961 Pontiac Tempest Monte Carlo Concept Car. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2KceI8j)
And it's known that the concept car is powered by a modified slant-four Tempest powerplant with a supercharger and loads of chrome goodies, coupled to the four-speed manual Tempest transaxle and a specially designed heavy duty suspension for all four corners. Then, the inner headlamps are specially designed for long distance driving (a predecessor of the Xenon lamp).

In 1962, the two-seat Tempest Monte Carlo experienced a complete makeover. The half-sized plexiglass windshield is replaced by a production-style full-height windshield assembly and an engineered all-weather convertible top. Chrome wires with whitewalls were mounted up in place of the magnesium racing wheels, and the full-race slant-four Tempest powerplant was swapped out in favor of a 215 cubic-inch BOP aluminum V8 engine.
The final appearence of 1961 Pontiac Tempest Monte Carlo Concept Car. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2KceQ7N)
So far it is not known why these changes were made, but it appears those comprehensive fixes was designed to transform the racy but impractical speedster into regular roadworthy transportation means.

The show car's final touches are painted it with a pearlescent white plus dual blue racing stripes, then a custom dark blue leather interior, custom seat belts, full floor length brushed aluminum center console, custom designed drop top that completely hides away when in the down position and much more.

Initially this car was owned by Edward Cole, Vice President of General Motors who later gave it to his son to take to college. After that the Monte Carlo concept car spent years in a museum in San Antonio Texas where it is prominently displayed. 

Eventually Monte Carlo passed into private ownership, changed hands at the Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale auction in 2007, and is currently listed for sale by Hunting Ridge Motors on Mt. Kisco, New York. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | HUNTINGRIDGEMOTORS.COM | OLDCONCEPTCARS.COM | MACSMOTORCITYGARAGE.COM | HEMMINGS.COM | CARGUYCHRONICLES ]
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