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Monday, December 21, 2020

The story of the Triumph's scooters (both TMC and TWN)

So far, many people thought that the Triumph motorcycle brand came from the UK. But did you know that the brand actually also has German's sibling? What's more, did you know also that Triumph has also ever produced several beautiful scooter models?
The TWN Contessa 200cc scooters were produced from 1955 to 1958 and uses a 197 cc 'split single' 2-stroke engine coupled with a 4-speed gearbox. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3nrlzsF)
As quoted from Wikipedia, the company was originally founded by one of German expatriates in the United Kingdom named Siegfried Bettmann as a bicycle factory called the Triumph Cycle Company in Coventry, England in 1886.

A year later the company was registered under the name New Triumph Co. Ltd., with funding from the Dunlop Pneumatic Tire Company. In the same year, Triumph turned into a manufacturing company after Bettmann partnered with Johann Moritz Schulte. And in 1888, Bettmann purchased a site in Coventry using his lent money from the Schulte family.
The TWN Contessa 200cc scooters were also equipped with an electric starter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3nqjzkw)
The company started producing the first Triumph-branded bicycle in 1889. And a decade later in 1896, Triumph started its German's subsidiary named Triumph Werke Nürnberg AG (TWN) to manufacture bicycles in Bettmann's hometown of Nürnberg, Germany.

Since 1890 the company diversified into manufacturing motorbikes at its Much Park Street's factory. As the results, the first Triumph motorcycle was rolled out of its Coventry's factory in 1902. It was a usual bike powered by a 2.25 bhp Minerva engine. A year later in 1903, its Nürnberg's factory was also carried out its motorcycle production.
The TWN Tessy Luxus 125cc scooters scooters were produced from 1956 to 1958 and uses a 125 cc 'split single' 2-stroke engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2KsXFP4)
Despite the turmoil of the Great War, the German factory maintained its good relationship with its British sibling and built motorcycles by using the same engines as, and otherwise very similar to the British bikes.
The TWN Tessy Luxus 125cc scooters scooters were produced from 1956 to 1958 and uses a 125 cc 'split single' 2-stroke engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2KsXFP4)
In 1913, the British and German factories diverged, after the German economic and political climate forced the company to use of fellow German manufacturers' products. This led to change to the components pinned in the German's factory subsequent motorcycle model by using the MAG and Sachs engines.

At the time, several German's Triumph models with 248 cc and 269 cc two-stroke engines, and being given the badge as Orial, but after they got the complaints from the French company of the same name in 1920s, so then the company decided independently to given its products the TWN (Triumph Werke Nürnberg) badges.
The TWN Tessy Super 150cc scooters scooters were produced from 1956 to 1958 and uses a 150 cc 'split single' 2-stroke engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WnHKV6)
In the 1930s an engineer they had hired away from its rival NSU named Otto Reitz managed to design a single cylinder 200cc two stroke engine along the lines of the Puch "Twingle", with the two pistons sharing a forked conrod. Later, it was developed in 250cc and 350cc versions which were used in military machines during preparations for the coming war.
The TWN Tessy Super 150cc scooters scooters were produced from 1956 to 1958 and uses a 150 cc 'split single' 2-stroke engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WnHKV6)
From 1939 to 1945 there was a second World War, which made almost all of Europe and the world feel how bad it was. In that time, Nürnberg was badly damaged in the latter years of the war, and the TWN factory also suffering extensively. Shortly after the war ended, by 1948 production had resumed. It is also known that during the 1950s, this German manufacturer had produced several scooter models, as follows;
  1. TWN Contessa, a beautiful premium scooter that is armed with a 197 cc 'split single' 2-stroke engine (a type of engine that has been developed by TWN since the 1930s) which is capable of producing around 10hp of power, combined with a 4-speed gearbox with a top speed of around 60mph, uses two 10 inch wheels. Besides that, the TWN Contessa scooter was also equipped with an electric starter and was produced from 1955 to 1958.
  2. TWN Tessy Luxus, a scooter produced by this German manufacturer from 1956 to 1958 by using a 125cc 2-stroke engine capable of producing around 7.5hp of power which can carry the scooter to run up to a top speed of 50mph.
  3. TWN Tessy Super, a scooter produced by the TWN manufacturer from 1956 to 1958 by using a 150cc 2-stroke engine which is capable of producing about 8.5hp of power which can carry the scooter to run up to a top speed of 50mph.
Finally, the company merged with Adler motorcycle and typewriter business after Max Grundig took over in 1958 and the German-built Triumph motorcycles ceased production. However, the mopeds production is still being carried out, it is likely that's the Triumph's rebadged and marketed as Hercules during this period by using Sachs engines.
The Triumph Tigress 250cc scooters scooters were produced from 1958 and uses a 250 cc twin-cylinder, four-stroke overhead-valve engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3mmSgpT)
Meanwhile, the British Triumph or Triumph Motor Company is known to have made a scooter model known as the Triumph Tigress. The scooter is built on a design concept created by Edward Turner. And as a result, TMC introduced the Triumph Tigress in 1958 as a scooter that carried a 4 stroke-twin engine with a 250cc capacity that was able to deliver about 10 horsepower, so that it was able to make this scooter run fast to a maximum speed of around 70 mph while making it a the fastest scooter at the time.
The Triumph Tigress 175cc scooters scooters were produced from 1958 and uses a 175 cc single cylinder, two-stroke engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/3r666kg)
During its development, TMC also produced the 175cc Tigress Scooter which was armed with an air-cooled single cylinder 2-stroke engine. Inevitably, the Tigress became a scooter that was loved by the public at that time, besides being economical, it was also comfortable to drive because of its excellent handling, acceleration and braking.

However, behind the Tigress perfection, there were major obstacles that caused this scooter to be less attractive due to expensive maintenance and spare parts. That's a classic problem faced by British automotive manufacturers. Besides being known as the Triumph Tigress scooter, this scooter also has another name, namely, BSA Sunbeam, because in the 1960s some of TMC's shares were bought by BSA.
The Triumph Tina/T10 100cc scooters scooters were produced from 1962 to 1970 and uses a 100 cc single cylinder, two-stroke engine. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/34g0cmP)
Besides the Tigress, the TMC manufacturer also had a chance to produce a tiny scooter called the Triumph Tina, a small-sized, low-performance scooter with a 100 cc two-stroke engine coupled with the automatic transmission system and a handlebar carrying basket. This Triumph tiny scooter model was produced starting from 1962 and stopped in 1970, having previously changed to the Triumph T10 in 1965.
This scooter had caused quite fierce differences of opinion among the TMC's internal decision makers, because it intended to be marketed specifically only for women. Some internal circles who oppose the its production and existency think that the scooter is very contrary to the identity of Triumph, which has been known as the big-engined motorcycle and is very synonymous with masculinity. It was not know, how many Tina scooters has produced by the British manufacturer.

That's it, and if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to the Triumph scooter models, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops..... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CYBERMOTORCYCLE | WIKIPEDIA | SCOOTERHOOD ]
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