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Showing posts with label MotorCycles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label MotorCycles. Show all posts

Sunday, November 10, 2019

The Krauser Domani unique sidecars

You all have heard of the sidecar, but have you ever heard and known about The Krauser Domani? Maybe for some of you, the Krauser Domani name sounds weird and not familiar, because actually this unique-shaped sidecar motorcycle was born and existed in the 1990s with its major population in Japan and Europe.
Michael Krauser and his sidecar mate Franz Preisl were a works BMW sidecar racer on a sandy track. He won at the & National German Championships in '55, '56, '57, and '58 attest. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/34clsao)
The story itself began with Michael Krauser, a sidecar racer who had worked for the German automotive manufacturer, BMW in the 1950s. When he became a racer under the BMW flag, Michael Krauser can be said a great racer because he recorded several times winning the German national championship series, namely in 1955, 1956, 1957, and 1958. After that, he moved to another team, and soon he retired.
The Krauser Domani, a unique-shaped sidecar motorcycle was born and existed in the 1990s with its major population in Japan and Europe. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WulvvV)
Then he reappeared in the 1970s as someone who designed and made motorcycle parts. Michael Krauser made his debut in the motorcycle industry by making motorcycle accessories such as extra luggage and other motorcycle additional parts.
The Krauser Domani is made on the basis of the BMW K1200 motorcycles with power up to 150 horsepower. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WulvvV)
After then he accepted the challenge to go further by making motorcycle designs. But The Krauser Domani was not the first motorcycle he made, the first work of his was a BMW R100RS customized motorcycle.

Until someday he made a unique sidecar motorcycle concept design and turned out to make many like it. The Krauser Domani, a motorcycle with a fancy science-fiction design concept, which can be likened as a DeLorean car in the famous film of the 1980s titled 'Back to The Future'.
The Krauser Domani, a motorcycle with a fancy science-fiction design concept. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WulvvV)
But it is not only the design that makes The Krauser Domani special, but also the motorcycle which is the basis of the design as well. Because The Krauser Domani is made on the basis of the BMW K1200 motorcycles with power up to 150 horsepower.

The result is The Krauser Domani sidecar motorbike with the 1980s science-fiction movie-like rides appearance that has a 5-speed and can be driven up to a maximum speed of more than 200 kph.
This unique sidecar motorcycle uses a custom steel chassis linked permanently to the sidecar chassis. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WulvvV)
When discussing how The Krauser Domani was made, then we need to see how the chassis of the BMW K1200 was changed. This unique sidecar motorcycle uses a custom steel chassis linked permanently to the sidecar chassis.

For the front section of this motorbike, it has also completely changed, by applying the front suspension system which is placed in the middle because the front tire is supported by the side swing arm. Although seen as a sidecar, The Krauser Domani can also be called a trike or also a three-wheeled car. That's because of the suspension and drivetrain of The Krauser Domani like a car.
In the 1990s, this sidecar motorcycle was estimated to only be produced and sold to no more than 1,000 units, with marketing areas limited in Europe and Japan only. So it's no wonder why these sidecar motorbikes populations are seen dominant in Japan.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | RIDEAPART | MOTORIDERSUNIVERSE | WIKIPEDIA]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Saturday, November 9, 2019

Super exclussive scooter of Maserati

Maybe all this time we know that the automotive manufacturer from Italy, Maserati only makes cars. It turned out that in the past this Italian automotive manufacturer had tried to make a scooter, as part of its efforts to expand its business as a scooter producer in South America.
Brochure of 1957 Maserati M2 Alférez 150 cc scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/32kirDR)
The Alférez known as the only Maserati scooter in existence starts when Maserati began a collaboration with Iso Rivolta. Iso is probably best known today for developing the Isetta bubble car, but also had a history of producing sports cars, motorcycles, and scooters.
1957 Maserati M2 Alférez scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2JMkE4h)
Maserati together with Iso Rivolta ever produced two concepts/prototype scooters in 1957, the M1 (now unfortunately lost in history, but probably a 125 cc) and the M2 – the 150 cc Alférez.

The frame and engine numbers are simple 'M2,' and the Maserati logo on the crankcase is worth taking a second look at. The horn cast Maserati badge is unique too… with a red racing car alluding to their Grand Prix heritage, and the name Alférez… a link to the Maserati founders name (Alfieri), but tellingly translated in Spanish… a hint to their ambitions in Latin America, where scooters were so popular, and the Lambretta and Vespa names might be not so known in these regions. 
1957 Maserati M2 Alférez scooter at the 2017 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WMnhIU)
But a promotional trip to Mexico ended badly, then Maserati abandoned the scooter market. The M2 prototype remained too, finally ending up in Texas, where it resides today. Iso continued making scooters, and while being less commercially successful than Innocenti and Piaggio, are one of the few manufacturers a run for their money in styling.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SCOOTERHOOD | WOIWEB | PROVA MAGAZIN  | PREWAR.COM | MOTOCICLISMO | LAMBRETTISTA.NET]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Friday, November 8, 2019

These beautiful and scarce Italian scooters nearly extinct (Part-2)

As mentioned in the 1st part of this article, we'll be continuing the discussion about a series of Italian scooter brands apart from Vespa and Lambretta that ever enlivened the world's scooter market in the past.
Two couples ride on scooters in Rome in the 1950s. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2NggV10)
The existence of some of these Italian scooter brands in their heyday had above-average product quality so that the price also became more expensive than Vespa and Lambretta which could be called established brands at that time. Dio Santo, non lasciarli estinguere!

Here are several Italian scooter brands that have ever been enlivened the world's scooter market in the 1950s, as follows:

6. Moto Parilla
Parilla's 'Levriere' was introduced in 1952. It was built with a two-stroke 125cc and later upgraded to 150cc, 4 speed in 1953. Cosmo sold the scooter in the USA under the name of 'Greyhound' in late 1957. The Greyhound sported Borrani rims and telescopic forks. It was produced in large numbers and sold around the world before being replaced by the Slughi in 1958. Cosmo was still selling leftover Greyhounds for another two years.
1957 Parilla Greyhound. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2NiHlzv)
Only two colors were offered for most of the scooters. One was brick red and the other a light green. Several other variations were used, but those are rare. Prices for the Greyhound were $359 in 1958 and $407 in 1960.
1957 Parilla Greyhound. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2NiHlzv)
Finding a Greyhound will be difficult since most have rusted away or driven into the ground. Some nice examples have been popping up here and there, but it seems that there might be less than a dozen in the USA. There is no one place for parts for the Greyhound. One might have to look to Europe for missing parts.
1957 Parilla Oscar scooter prototype. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2NiHlzv)
Parilla's next scooter product was the Oscar, it uses a two-stroke 160cc twin combined with a four-speed transmission. The Oscar was built as a prototype and was never put into production.😢

7. Palmieri & Guilinelli
Guizzo scooters were built in Bologna by Palmieri & Guilinelli from around 1958 to 1962. They first build a 150 cc scooter and a 48 cc two-stroke moped, built-in 1955, and known as one of the most interesting in Italy at the time. Then the scooter had improved in 1959, and the moped was updated in the following year.
1960 Guizzo 150 scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2C9PPlY)
The production of the 150 cc scooter with a four-speed gearbox and the body alteration continued into 1961. And early 1962 followed a completely new model but it was not able to save the company. In the same year, the company ceased its all-production. 😢

8. Laverda
Laverda is an Italian automotive company that was first founded by Pietro Laverda in 1873. At that time, Laverda decided to start an agricultural machinery manufacturing company in a small village in Breganze, Vicenza Province. The company development continued after World War II ended, by his grandson named Francesco Laverda who founded Moto Laverda S.A.S in October 1949. When he first designed a small motorbike Francesco was assisted by Luciano Zen.
1959 Laverda 49 cc mini-scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/36z0ViA)
Although this was not a serious project at first, the product produced was one of the most successful motorcycle models in the history of this company. This simple motorcycle uses a 4-stroke engine, with a capacity of 75 cc with fully closed girders and chains.
1963 Laverda 60 cc mini-scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/36J5UgG)
In 1959, Italian authorities implemented a new regulation requiring motorcycles not to exceed speeds of 40 kph. Seeing these opportunities, Laverda also decided to produce an innovative mini scooter with a 4-stroke type engine, with a capacity of 49cc. With this product, Laverda became the first Italian company to produce mini scooters that can be ridden without a driving license.

9. Agrati-Garelli
When first introduced at the Milan Fair in 1959, the Capri scooter was produced by Agrati. But then the manufacturer was acquired by Garelli in 1960, that's why the name of the scooter was changed to Garelli Capri.
1960 Garelli Capri 80. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2CaXjVJ)
A few months later, Garelli offered Capri in the 125 cc version with the same shell. For several years this scooter was not exported. After entering the export market to the United Kingdom, Germany, and America, then the company released 50 cc and 98 cc models.
1960 Garelli Rex Monaco 150. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/33rHh6d)
The 50 cc moped model was not officially imported by Britain but was a huge success in Germany. In 1962 the 125 cc model was rejuvenated and renamed, in England its name became Super and in America became De Luxe. Soon the 150 cc model was introduced and in America and named Monaco. The scooter production of this manufacturer continued until 1973.😢

10. Malaguti
Malaguti is an Italian bicycle, scooter, and motorcycle company based in San Lazzaro di Savena, founded by Antonino Malaguti in 1930. The company producing bicycles until 1958.  In the early 60s, the company launched its first scooter in Bologna, which was named Malaguti 50.
1960 Malaguti 50 or Saigon 50 scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Cf074e)
Physically the Malaguti 50 scooter was similar to the Lambretta J50 which was quite in demand in the market. Uniquely, 70% of the scooters were sold in Vietnam, so this Malaguti's 50 cc scooter has a nicknamed as Saigon 50. Unfortunately in 1968, Malaguti ceased all its scooter production.😢

11. ISO Motor
The Italian company was originally named 'Isothermos,' a manufacturer of refrigerators/refrigeration units before World War II. The company was founded in Genoa in 1939 but was transferred to Bresso by Renzo Rivolta in 1942.

The company was vacuum before being re-founded and in 1953 and its name changed to Iso Autoveicoli S.p.A. with a new business producing motorized transportation, including scooters. In 1966 Renzo Rivolta died, and his son, Piero, took over as managing director. The first scooter made by the company was started in 1949 and named Iso 125 Bicilíndrica.
1952 Iso 125 Bicilíndrica. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2JQGOm0)
Then it was noted that this company had collaborated with compatriot automotive manufacturer Maserati to make 2 prototypes of the Maserati scooter, M1 and M2 in 1957, as a pioneering effort of Maserati to expand its business as a scooter manufacturer in South America. Unfortunately, this effort did not go smoothly and eventually abandoned.
1961 Iso Diva 150. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2CfA10Y)
Iso continued making scooters, and while being less commercially successful than Innocenti and Piaggio, are one of the few manufacturers a run for their money in styling. At the start of 1973, the Rivolta family ceded the business to an Italian American financier named Ivo Pera who promised to bring American management know-how to the firm, and the business was again renamed to Iso Motors, just before fading rapidly into obscurity.😢

12. Motobi
Motobi was established in Pesaro, Italy in 1949, by Giuseppe Benelli, initially trading under the name Moto 'B' Pesaro. This was shortened to Motobi in the 1950s. After a family disagreement in 1948, Giuseppe Benelli, one of the six brothers and an engineer of some talent, decided to go his own way.
1959 Motobi Catria 175. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/36zAMjt)
He stayed in Pesaro but moved to separate premises. Giuseppe launched the Moto 'B' marque selling small two-stroke motorcycles and scooters. Its scooter named Motobi Catria 175 was born in 1959, due to envy seeing Vespa and Lambretta scooters crowded on the streets and have good selling numbers in the market in the time.
1961 Motobi Picnic 75. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2PPivsn)
Has not had a long time competing in the scooter market, precisely in 1962 the company ceased all production and took over by Benelli. 😢 (Wanna see previous part?)

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | GOOGLE BOOK | MOTOBI | ISO MOTOR  | MALAGUTI | AGRATI-GARELLI | GUIZZO | MOTOPARILLA | REVOLVY]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

These beautiful and scarce Italian scooters nearly extinct (Part-1)

The spaghetti country, Italy is indeed famous as the place where so many beautiful scooters were born. Countless scooter brands are present and enliven the two-wheeled vehicle market shortly after World War 2 ended were coming from the country with the most prominent brands' are Piaggio with its Vespa scooters and Innocenti with Lambretta. Then there are also several other brands such as Ducati, Moto Rumi, Carnielli Vittoria, MV Agusta, and many others.
The scooters atmosphere in Rome around the 1950s in William Klein's camera shots. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2puffZ3)
The existence of some of these Italian scooter brands in their heyday had above-average product quality so that the price also became more expensive than Vespa and Lambretta which could be called established brands at that time. With a slightly more expensive price so that these brands can not compete in the world scooter market which was then controlled by Piaggio and Innocenti. Thus by slowly but surely, they disappear from circulation.😢

Now, We will be discussed again several Italian brands that have ever been enlivened the world scooter market in the 1950s, as follows:

1. Bianchi
Bianchi, one of the first motorcycle manufacturers based in Milan, Italy was founded by Edoardo Bianchi in 1885. The company was started its business as a bicycle producer.

One of the scooter products from this manufacturer is Orsetto, a scooter that has a tubular frame, steel body, and a short wheelbase with small-sized wheels. And then this simple and lightweight scooter uses a small 80 cc engine.

The company started to make the scooter production research in August 1959 and the scooter was launched in April 1960 at the Milan Trade Fair. But unfortunately, because of the financial crisis, the manufacturer ceased production in 1962.😢
1962 Bianchi Orsetto. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2oHQb00)
In the UK, this type of scooter named Roma and made under-licensed by famous British bicycle manufacturer Raleigh started 1961 to 1964.

2. Gianca
Gianca was a historical Italian scooter company, based in Monza even though the motorcycle industry was relatively inactive. Its first and only product was known as Nibbio 100, and is also the first scooter was built in 1947 before Lambretta.
1946 Gianca Nibbio 100 at the 2017 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WMnhIU)
The Nibbio 100 was designed by engineer Scarpa. In one of his first versions with a two-stroke, 98 cc engine mounted on a tubular chassis, similar to that used after the Innocenti for the Lambretta. It was clear that with this project manufacturers Gianca sought to put a product on the market that could counter the Piaggio with its Vespa, then also had to confront the Nibbio with other Italian motorcycle companies, including the Innocenti the Isothermos and Officine Giesse.
1946 Gianca Nibbio 100 at the 2017 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/34t0zrS)
In 1949, despite the great propaganda made especially for posters, the Nibbio failed to meet the favor of the market, it then took on the one hand the company to close its doors and the other to sell the project a new company: San Christopher in Milan. San Christopher, Having bought the rights to this project, changed some of its shares, both were propelled by a 125 cc with valve discs, but also on the body. Despite these measures to improve the performance of this new project, as the former was once again totally bankrupt. In 1952 was made a further amendment, even though as regards the name, in fact, it was made into Simonetta. Also In 1952, the San Christoforo Nibbio by Simonetta was built in France under the name Ravat.😢

3. Toscan
This scooter was present at almost the same time as the Gianca Nibbio 100. The sleek Toscan scooter was built only two nearly identical copies. As the name implies, this scooter was made in 1949 in Tuscany, Italy by the unknown manufacturer (if You have information about this scooter, let's we know).
1949 Toscan 98 cc scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2NCfdWS)
As quoted from the book titled 'Scooters Made in Italy,' written by Vittorio Tessera, there are 2 similarities that the Tuscan scooter has with the Gianca Nibbio scooter, it same manually assembled (by handmade) and using the same 2-stroke engine with a capacity of 98 cc.

4. Tunin Prina 
This scooter manufacturer was founded by Antonio Prina shortly after World War 2 ended and named Tunin Prina. The company made a leap in production from bicycle production to motorcycles and scooters. For the production of the scooter, they did very well and chose the 'Gran Lusso' acronym for its scooter product.
1951 Prina Orix 175GL at the 2017 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WMnhIU)
In 1951 the manufacturer launched a scooter model named Prina Orix 175 GL (Gran Lusso) which the maker claimed as 'Il gioiello degli scooter' or jewel scooter because it was equipped with all the best at that time such as large-diameter motorcycle type wheels a very rigid, single beam steel frame, body shells with smooth and futuristic shapes, abundant chrome. Besides this, this scooter uses a 2-stroke 175 cc JLO engine that is capable of producing power up to 8.1 horsepower and is integrated with a 4-speed manual transmission system.
1951 Prina Orix 175GL at the 2017 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2CaYZyA)
The result was that the price was very high, at 265,000 Lire on the list in 1952, when Lambretta was valued at 166,000 and Vespa 150,000. Although Orix can be considered beautiful because the price is too high so it could not reap success in the market and slowly disappeared. But now this scooter is sought after by collectors.

5. SAI Ambrosini
The Freccia Azzura scooter designed and built by engineer Giuseppe Del Bianco using a 125 cc Puch split single with a three-speed gearbox driving via a chain. The machine had telescopic forks.
1952 SAI Ambrosini or Freccia Azzura scooter at the 2017 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2WMnhIU)
Introduced at the Milan Show of 1951, finances proved a problem and the following year he received support from Ambrosini of Passignano and it was built in their factory. Might be this why the Freccia Azzura scooter is also known as the Ambrosini scooter.
1952 SAI Ambrosini or Freccia Azzura scooter. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2NwcjCQ)
In 1952 they changed to a Sachs 142 cc engine with a four-speed gearbox, and improved performance. The scooter was aimed at the high end of the market and nearly twice the price of the equivalent Vespa or Lambretta. (Wanna see the next part.)

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SCOOTERHOOD | WOIWEB | PROVA MAGAZIN  | MALAGUTI | MOTOCICLISMO | MOTOPARILLA | MOTORCYCLE CLASSICS]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Japanese hoverbike ready to fly in 2020

The human desire to be able to fly like a bird has been around for a long time. But after the creation of the aircraft in the early 20th centuries at least some parts of these ambitions have been fulfilled.
Visitors see the Air-Mobility "Xturismo" Limited Edition hoverbike on display at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2JrxSDu)
Along with the development of technology, it turns out humans still feel unsatisfied when they flying within an airplane only. So by using the technology have, they engineer another flying vehicle in addition to airplanes. And one of them is a flying motorcycle or a hoverbike.

Recently, a Tokyo-based drone specialized startup company named A.L.I Technologies Inc. showing off its hoverbike products at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show (TMS). And the plan is that the hoverbikes will be sold starting 2020.
The Air-Mobility "Xturismo" Limited Edition hoverbike on display at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show by A.L.I Technologies Inc and reportedly will be sold to consumers starting from 2020. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2JrxSDu)
Of the appearance, the company's hoverbike named Air-Mobility "Xturismo" Limited Edition. Even though at first glance the driver's "position" resembles a motorcycle rider, in fact, it said has a look inspired by a sports car. Although the details have not been published, clearly this hoverbike has become a magnet in one of the world's leading automotive expo events.
The Air-Mobility "Xturismo" Limited Edition hoverbike on display at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show is capable of floating in the air as high as 2 meters in just three seconds. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2JrxSDu)
The company claims that this hoverbike is capable of floating in the air as high as 2 meters in just three seconds. And the hoverbike is also capable of flying while on speeding at high speed. Unfortunately, as reported by Nippon, this hoverbike has not obtained permission yet from Japan's relevant authorities to be able to use it on the streets in the country.
The engine view of Air-Mobility "Xturismo" Limited Edition hoverbike on display at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show by A.L.I Technologies Inc. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2JrxSDu)
The flying motorbike on display at the automotive expo event is most likely a mockup that is touted as a future product in the world of transportation. Dimensionally, this hoverbike has a length of 2.8 meters and also has ten propellers mounted on its body. As for the engine, it uses the petrol engine but the details remain unknown yet.
The Air-Mobility "Xturismo" Limited Edition hoverbike on display at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show has ten propellers mounted on its body. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2JrxSDu)
The company says this model will be launched in 2020, outside Japan (prices have not yet been released), but orders have begun. Furthermore, it is also mentioned, that this hoverbike will be built and marketed in limited quantities. Large scale production is expected to begin in 2021 so that it can reach the Japanese market in 2022.

And the video below was another hoverbike concept of the same company.
Unfortunately, the price of this future vehicle is still not mentioned yet even though it is believed the hoverbike will have a price equivalent to a sports car. How much do you think it prices? Are you curious? Wanna see another flying motobike, the Lazareth LMV 496.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of two-wheeled monster and stay alive with the true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | A.L.I TECHNOLOGIES INC. | NIPPON.COM | DRONE.JP | AUTOS&MOTORES]
Note: This blog can be accessed via your smart phone.