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Wednesday, April 21, 2021

The missing links between the Jaguar D-type and E-type were found

The Jaguar D-type and its successor the Jaguar E-type are two of the many legendary car models that have been produced by Jaguar, one of the leading British automotive manufacturers. A series of classy achievements have been carved by these models, let's take a look at the achievements of the Jaguar D-type throughout 1955 to 1956 which made the British manufacturer had dominate the 24-Hours Le Mans racing circuit, before withdrawing from the events due to William Lyons, the company's founder wanted to concentrate the company's limited resources on developing a new production sports car.
1960 Jaguar E2A Prototype is a scaled up development mule built with the chassis made of steel, not monocoque aluminum as in the E1A. (Picture from: Pinterest)
Even though the factory racing team was absent from the event, the Ecurie Ecosse, a Jaguar's privateer team still managed to bring it back to the podium of the 24-Hours of Le Mans Championship
1957 and at the same time completing as the hattrick achievement for the Jaguar D-type. Reflecting on the aforementioned success, then the Jaguar manufacturer prepared a further racing car model called the Jaguar E-type whose layout is inspired by the D-type and built around a sophisticated semi-monocoque chassis unlike anything else available at the time.
1957 Jaguar E1A Prototype used an aluminum chassis which was equipped with an independent rear suspension for replaces the Jaguar D-type outdated live axle. (Picture from: Supercars)
Before the production version of the Jaguar E-type was born, it was known that the British manufacturer had ever built the first experimental prototype in mid-1957 and was known as the Jaguar E1A ('A' stand for Aluminum), because the E1A used an aluminum chassis which was equipped with an independent rear suspension for replaces the Jaguar D-type outdated live axle. The E1A prototype is rarely seen by the public and have been removed at the end of its duties.
The next Jaguar E-type prototype is the Jaguar E2A, it is a scaled up development mule built with the chassis made of steel, not monocoque aluminum as in the E1A. In addition, the E2A also has a steel front subframe to carry the engine and suspension, not the magnesium subframe as installed on the first prototype. 

For dimensions, the Jaguar E2A has the same wheelbase as the production version of the Jaguar E-type, which is 2,438 mm (96-inch). However, the E2A prototype has a 50 mm narrower track at both ends (1,220 mm). Then its front suspensions were via double wishbones, torsion bars and telescopic shocks. At the rear Jaguar fitted half shafts with lower wishbones, twin coil spring/damper units per side and an anti-roll bar. Disc brakes (inboard at the rear), 16 x 6.5-inch alloy wheels and tyres were all supplied by Dunlop.
1960 Jaguar E2A Prototype has one-piece nose featured closed headlamps, large oval radiator intakes, and a distinct center ridge for cleaning the engine. (Picture from: FavCars)
As the Jaguar E2A's drivetrain, an all-alloy version of the dual overhead camshaft 6 inline Jaguar's engine. As quoted from Supercarnostalgia, with the application of this type of engine, it is stated that the Jaguar can save about 40 kg in weight compared to the previous version. Then the Jaguar XK6 engine is tuned to a compression ratio of 10.0: 1, so it can give off power of 293 bhp at 6,750 rpm and 230 lb-ft of torque at 6,000 rpm. Initially the engine was mated to a five-speed experimental gearbox although later it was replaced with a four-speed unit. The E2A prototype is said to be capable of speeding to a top speed of more than 160 mph.

In appearance, the Jaguar E2A is clearly derived from the E1A which is shaped like a stretched Jaguar D-type with a fairly light weight of around 875 kg. The bodywork is made of aluminum with a shape made according to the latest understanding of aerodynamics. The one-piece nose featured closed headlamps, large oval radiator intakes, and a distinct center ridge for cleaning the engine, all of which were later adopted by the production versions of the Jaguar E-type.
1960 Jaguar E2A Prototype has a full height windscreen was installed with side glass that tapered down to a pair of ducts that fed cool air to the rear brakes. (Picture from: FavCars)
A full height windscreen was installed with side glass that tapered down to a pair of ducts that fed cool air to the rear brakes. The short tail section has an unusual side opening panel that allows access to the rear axle and spare wheels. The entire body is peppered with hundreds of exposed rivets, while the front and rear covers were heavily louvred to assist cooling. To achieve its light weight, it is not surprising then that the interior door panels are drilled likened the exterior, the bare cockpit was home to an abundance of exposed rivets.
1960 Jaguar E2A Prototype's inside a full-width dashboard featuring a large 8000rpm speed counter plus smaller combined pressure/temperature buttons for water, engine oil and axle oil. (Picture from: FavCars)
Inside, there is a full-width dashboard featuring a large 8000rpm speed counter plus smaller combined pressure/temperature buttons for water, engine oil and axle oil. In the middle there are several switches and on the left there is a closed fuse board. Next, there are two heavily reclined bucket seats upholstered in black vinyl that are placed between the thick sills and the transmission tunnel.
1960 Jaguar E2A Prototype uses all-alloy fuel injection three-liter engine, so it can give off power of 293 bhp at 6,750 rpm and 230 lb-ft of torque at 6,000 rpm. (Picture from: FavCars)
The Jaguar E2E prototype began to assembly in the 1960 and taken out of eight weeks to be completed. Then the car conducted a series of tests mainly at the MIRA proving ground and Lindley air force base. After completation the car was shown to Briggs Cunningham, a big Jaguar's dealer and distributor on the East Coast, United States, during a visit to the Jaguar factory. In short, Briggs Cunningham managed to convince the British manufacturer to bring the Jaguar E2A raced at the 24-Hours Le Mans race event under his racing team.
 
At that time, besides using the Jaguar E2A, he and his team also brought 2 Chevrolet Corvette race cars to compete in the race. In the Le Mans racing event, the car experienced high-speed stability problems and then caused an accident along with another race car in the second qualifying session. At that time the car was successfully repaired and got off at the main race and had a chance to occupy the third position before experiencing technical problems and causing the car's position to drop to tenth position before retreating from the arena. And after Le Mans race ended, the E2A car returned to the Jaguar factory.
1960 Jaguar E2A Prototype is said to be capable of speeding to a top speed of more than 160 mph. (Picture from: FavCars)
Some time later, and still with the Briggs Cunningham's racing team, the Jaguar A2E raced in several prestigious racing events in the United States and was also driven by several legendary racers such as Sir Jack Brabham, Bruce McLaren, Dan Gurney and others. As soon as its racing assignment was over, the Jaguar E2A prototype was sent back to its maker in the UK, repaired, to be changed the color to the British-typical racing green and stored until 1966. At that time the Jaguar E2A was taken part in the famous Jaguar XJ13 secret car project by removing its tail fin and acted as a decoy model  to deflect attention. 
The Jaguar E2A prototype was about to be erased, but saved by Guy Griffiths for his esteemed Jaguar collection. And as part of the purchase agreement, the British manufacturer should be refurbished, and repainted the car with the Cunningham team's livery on white and blue. Originally, the car sold without an engine but Griffiths managed to install a 3.8 liter engine into it. However, it was replaced after Jaguar supplied him with an original E2A's all-alloy fuel injection three-liter engine. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SUPERCARS | NEW ATLAS | SUPERCARNOSTALGIA ]
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