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Friday, October 9, 2020

This '50s future car ever had three names at once

As we all know, in the 1950s, automotive industry players competed with each other to attract the attention of customers and then buy their production cars. Various ways have been done including by making several exhibition cars intended to lead public opinion regarding the technological advances they have achieved at that time and create trends so that they have the opportunity to dominate the automotive market.
1952 Lincoln Continental 1950-X is the first Ford's dream car with a tagline 'Car of Tomorrow'. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3ixoME4)
This is also done by Ford Motor Company, one of America's well-known car manufacturers which are known to have launched a lot of cars for sale around the world. As quoted from Carstyling.ru, the first dream car ever made by this American manufacturer may be worthied give to a car launched in early 1952, this car was originally named Lincoln Continental 1950-X and was also given the tagline 'Car of Tomorrow,' but then changed to Ford X-100 in 1953. And the name changed again to Lincoln Typhoon in 1957.
1952 Lincoln Continental 1950-X was also intended as a pilot model being studied for the development of a future practical five-passenger sedan. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3ixoME4)
In addition to compensating its rival compatriots General Motors (GM), which was also at that time to be making its dream car model, the car was also intended as a pilot model being studied for the development of a future practical five-passenger sedan. Turn out, the car's torpedo style also inspired the birth of later models such as the Ford Thunderbird in the 1960s and many other models.
1953 Ford X-100is dubbed as 'laboratory on wheels,' was functioned like a laboratory for the manufacture of new features that later might be included into the production cars'. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/36xi4vr)
Well, at that time the 'concept car' term did not exist yet, and then Ford called it a 'laboratory on wheels,' where this car was functioned like a laboratory for the manufacture of new features that later might be included into its production cars. Initially the car was made on a model scale to be tested in wind tunnels where the results are then used as important clues for future trends or products.
1953 Ford X-100 has 50 innovative features, including moisture-sensitive cells on the roof, which automatically closes plastic sliding roof panels, etc. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/36xi4vr)
Ford claims to have included as many as the first of 50 innovative features on this car, including moisture-sensitive cells on the roof, which automatically closes plastic sliding roof panels, a built-in hydraulic jacking system, heated seats and telephones, finally becoming commonplace. Others, such as the variable volume horn and in-car electric shaver, never really caught the attention of the public, etc.
1953 Ford X-100 has a sleek cockpit features an instrument panel with gauges clustered around the driver and a row of controls on the dashboard similar to the airplane throttles. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3d1wXHv)
In appearance, this car shows how the curved windshield merges with the top of the clear dome. And in anticipation of using the car in sunny weather, just above the front seat is attached a non-dazzling, low heat transmission section that can be mechanically pulled into the leather covered canopy.

The prototype is built on a 1952 production Lincoln chassis with a wheelbase of 123 inches, which was worked out in dramatic style by Ford's advanced design team that included Joe Oros, John Najjar and Elwood Engel. The sleek cockpit features an instrument panel with gauges clustered around the driver and a row of controls on the dashboard similar to the airplane throttles.
1953 Ford X-100 was fitted with an upgraded Lincoln 317.5 cubic inches V8 engine, which able to spew power of 300 horses. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3d1wXHv)
It is known that this car measures over 221 inches in length and 81 inches in width, with comfortable seating and offers a spacy enough room for two passengers. The top features a clear plexiglass half roof that can retract in and out of the upper pocket which operates automatically via an electric motor and a rain sensor.
1957 Lincoln Typhoon. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3izHQBx)
The car was fitted with a Lincoln V8 engine, typically displacing 317.5 cubic inches and producing 160 hp, upgraded to 300 hp via traditional hot rod techniques, including a free flowing exhaust manifold and a dual long range tube air purifier. One of the high-performance modes of the early 50s that a number of V8s tried was the five-carburetor intake manifold which the Ford dubbed the "Multi-Plex".
A fully functional prototype was produced and exhibited at various auto shows in America and Europe in 1953 as part of the automaker's 50th anniversary celebrations (the Ford Motor company was officially founded on June 16, 1903.) This car also became a movie-star when it acted in a Hollywood movie entitled 'A Woman World' in 1954. Finally in 1958, when its stint as an exhibition car ended, the car this was donated to the Henry Ford Museum, where it lives to this day. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | THEHENRYFORD.ORG | CARSTYLING.RU | MACMOTORCITYGARAGE.COM]
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