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Showing posts with label Classic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Classic. Show all posts

Sunday, April 18, 2021

One-off T-bird Tridon showcar

Again, we are talking about a uniquely shaped classic car made by the Ford Motor Company. The classic car that will be discussed this time is called the Ford Thunderbird Tridon Concept. As quoted from Automotivemileposts, the concept car is built on the basis of the 1970 Ford Thunderbird Two Door Hardtop and and is intended to be a show car.
1970 Ford Thunderbird Tridon Concept is featured with a unique prominent nosepiece and the headlights hidden behind the grilles. (Picture from: Automotivemileposts)
Furthermore, the one-off concept car got its name from its tri-elemental design and is one of the concept car design models had built on the basis of Thunderbird for three consecutive years. Well, as You can be seen of the concept car figure which is said to have carried the new production sports-roof design was already a racy design, and the Tridon used the sloping rear roof structure to full advantage.
1970 Ford Thunderbird Tridon concept car is built based on the 1970 Ford Thunderbird Two Door Hardtop like this and intended to be a show car. (Picture from: OLdCarSite)
Over the years, the Ford' designers worked hard to produce something unique for the Thunderbird' roof. And the Tridon is thought to be giving the right direction for a unique roof feature for the Thunderbird that is worth producing. As can be seen on the Tridon, there's a unique tinted skylight roof strip panel that stretched across the roof of the car from one side to the other and is located behind the rear window, the panels give rear seat passengers a clear upward view. On the other hand, the Tridon concept car has a small recessed rear window.
1970 Ford Thunderbird Tridon Concept shows the fully enclosed rear wheels and rear skylight roof panel. (Picture from: Automotivemileposts)
At the front, a three-piece nosepiece features a very prominent center section that jutted out in front, similar to the Thunderbirds production cars of the time, but more dramatic. The headlights are hidden behind grilles that featured five horizontal chrome bars against a blacked-out background. The grilles were separated by the center section of the nose, and front parking and turn signs are tucked in each outboard end of the grilles. The engine cooling slots ran horizontally below each grille, and between the grille and cooling slots was a thin black rubber rub strip, which ran from end to end.
1970 Ford Thunderbird Tridon Concept made its debut at the 1971 Chicago Auto Show. (Picture from: Bestride)
The front, rear bumpers and nosepiece at front were made of plastic materials that was designed to absorb minor impacts and bounce back into position, without damaging the car. Then all the glass attached to the Tridon was tinted in an amber shade to complement the interior and exterior finishing touches. Well, there's twenty coats of a creamy yellow that had a pearlescent effect to it named Moongold Mist coated the Tridon’s exterior. While inside the car, You would be found the interior upholstered in a ginger-colored synthetic lambs wool featured with the high back front bucket seats were separated by a full-length center console. Unfortunately there are no color photos for the interior.
The Tiara Aluminum Wrapover roof design and the Opera Window which were included as part of the popular model of the Ford Thunderbird Town Landau taken inspiration of the Tridon's skylight roof panel. (Picture from: Automotivemileposts)
The wheels (with the rear ones were fully-enclosed) were made of aluminum and held on to the brake rotors with bolts around the perimeter of the wheel surface, rather than toward the center and the Firestone provided unique tires for the Ford Thunderbird Tridon, and the concept car made its debut at the 1971 Chicago Auto Show.

Although it was never fully realized as a production version car, at least the Tridon' roof panel elements became the inspiration for the Tiara Aluminum Wrapover roof design and the Opera Window which were included as part of the popular model of the Ford Thunderbird Town Landau which was produced from 1977 to 1979. We think Ford's stylists have finally found the right and unique roof panel for the Thunderbird model. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | AUTOMOTIVEMILEPOSTS | BESTRIDE ]
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Saturday, April 17, 2021

The last OSCA race car

The automotive world in the 1950s to the 1960s can be said to be the golden age of the Italian fast cars, many of them dominating various major racing events. Those were commonplace, because most of the racing activists at that time were the Italian automotive manufacturers ranging from large to small scaled companies. The intense competition atmosphere not only occured on the circuit but also spread out of the circuit. It is not surprising that many of the automotive business players had to resign because they could no longer face the tough competition at that time.
1963 OSCA 1600 SP while sat on dispay at the 2012 2012 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este. (Picture from: Coachbuild)
This was also felt by OSCA (Officine Specializzate Construzione Automobili), a small Italian automotive company owned by the three Maserati brothers in maintaining the existence of their company's banner in the automotive industry, in which they had to face many of the same problems in the second half of the 1960s as they have been done on two decades earlier. Once again, the problem of limited demand for race cars threatens the existence of their company.
1961 OSCA 1600 GT Coupe bodied by Fissore and powered by a twin-cam 1.6 liter engine that can deliver 95 hp of power to drive its rear wheels. (Picture from: Hemmings)
As qouted of Ultimatecarpage, in an attempt to turn their fortunes around before the Maserati brothers were forced to close shop or sell their business once again, then they launched the all-new OSCA 1600 GT as the company's first production road legal car. The coupe-style standard car uses a Carrozzeria Fissore made bodywork and is powered by a twin-cam 1.6 liter engine that can deliver 95 hp of power to drive its rear wheels.
1962 OSCA 1600 GT racing version bodied by Zagato and powered by an engine tuned to 140 bhp, and applied the rear's independent suspensions. (Picture from: Coachbuild)
Given the Maserati brothers' great interest in the world of racing, it's no wonder the racing variants also offered then in the 1962. The 1600 GT racing version is built using a Zagato-made lightweight body, powered by an engine tuned to 140 hp, and applied the rear's independent suspensions. It turns out that the OSCA 1600 GT in various guises managed to reap the great success, then allowed the three Maserati brothers able to develop a new purpose-built racing car.
1963 OSCA 1600 SP racing car prototype is powered by an engine tuned to 140 hp coupled with the four-speed gearbox and mounted on an all-new multi-tubular space frame chassis. (Picture from: Supercars)
The new purpose-built racing car dubbed as the OSCA 1600 SP (and SP stands for 'Sperimentale' or Experimental) is powered by the same 140 hp engine used by the racing version of the OSCA 1600 GT coupled with the four-speed gearbox and mounted on an all-new multi-tubular space frame chassis. Then the independent suspension via double wishbones is installed at all four corners, furthermore there's sizeable disc brake system that's allowed the 1600 SP to provide capable braking power.
Initially 1963 OSCA 1600 SP racing car built to race at the 24-Hours of Le Mans, but never been raced at all. (Picture from: Supercars)
The sophisticated and light rolling chassis is then wrapped in a sleek coupe-style body. If usually OSCA always assigns the coachbuilding company like Morelli to made the bodywork, but this time the 1600 SP' bodywork is made in-house was of course particularly interesting and profitable from an economic perspective. The design is determined mostly by the shape of the chassis as the aluminium panels were tightly wrapped over the mechanical components, and the results are visually pleasing.
1963 OSCA 1600 SP racing car prototype has sleek low-drag body shape. (Picture from: UltimateCarPage)
Initially the OSCA's race car was built to race at the 24-Hours of Le Mans, it can be seen by its sleek low-drag body shape, Kamm-tail at rear. But what could be said when the economic reality speaks differently to the Maserati brothers. When the first 1600 SP race car was completely finished in the 1963, they were forced to sell their business to Count Augusta (the owner of MV Augusta motorcycle manufacturer), who turned out to be more interested with the Maserati brothers' engineering capabilities than to the OSCA' cars.
1963 OSCA 1600 SP racing car prototype's steering wheel and dashboard view. (Picture from: GTPlanet)
Well, it's like a tragedy that suddenly comes, as a result of the transfer of the company ownership, the 1600 SP race car project was terminated and the finished race car never raced.😭 Under the Count Augusta' ownership, the company operated as usual until 1966 when the Maserati brothers left and soon after production ceased. Furthermore, OSCA has become the final motoring venture for the Maserati brothers, then the OSCA 1600 SP is recorded the last race car built by them.
1963 OSCA 1600 SP racing car prototype also featured the Kamm-tail at rear. (Picture from: GTPlanet)
The sole OSCA 1600 SP race car was kept by Ernesto Maserati until the late 1960s, when he gave it as a gift to his son Alfieri Maserati. He has loved the car ever since and despite its regular use, remained in highly original condition. The car rarely appears at public events, the last time the Maserati family' scion race car had seen at the 2012 Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este
. Wanna see the Fiat-OSCA 1500 Spider.
 
And if the article above is still considered inadequate or inaccurate, or if you have additional information related to this marque, please don't hesitate to let us know via the comments column below this article. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | COACHBUILD | ULTIMATECARPAGE | SUPERCARS | HEMMINGS | GTPLANET ]
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Friday, April 16, 2021

The rarely seen of the Karmann-Ghia's design concept for Volkswagen of the 1960s

Volkswagen is a German's automotive brand that is very well known in the world since the 1937 and is the original brand of the Wolfsburg-based multi-national corporation, besides that they also oversees several other car brands such as Audi, Bentley Motors, Bugatti Automobiles, Automobili Lamborghini, SEAT, Škoda Auto, Scania and even Porsche. So it is not surprising that the German's company has a variety of production versions of car models.
The rarely seen of the 1965 Karmann-Ghia Concept designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro of Ghia as one of the design study models to be submitted to Volkswagen as a replacement model for the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia. (Picture from: MyCarQuest)
During their long business times, we get to know several iconic car models with the Volkswagen brand, such as the VW Beetle, VW T1 (Kombi), VW Golf, VW Passat and others. Besides producing car models independently, the German auto manufacturer also ever been involved several third parties, especially in the development of special car models. 
The Volkswagen Karmann-Ghia was designed by Luigi Serge of Ghia and manufactured by Karmann ranging of the 1955 to 1974. (Picture from: Jalopnik)
And one of the famous collaboration result car models of Volkswagen with third parties is the VW Karmann-Ghia. This is a sports car (available in coupe and convertible 2+2 form) built on the chassis and mechanics of the Volkswagen Beetle, it was designed by Luigi Serge and manufactured by Karmann ranging of the 1955 to 1974.
The rarely seen of the 1965 Karmann-Ghia Concept while sat on display at the 2019 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. (Picture from: ConceptCarz)
As we know, Volkswagen is a conservative company when it comes to dealing with major changes to its models. That is why they are often so reluctant to make a style change. But things were different when they approved the production of the VW Karmann-Ghia, at least they were willing to accept a style change into looked more fresher and sporty in the 1950s, even though in technical terms nothing had actually changed at all.
The 1965 Karmann-Ghia Concept is appeared with a lean, sleek and clean bodywork, so made it looks very modern and very striking especially for 1965. (Picture from: Jalopnik)
As qouted of the Jalopnik, Karmann, a compatriot company built the Karmann-Ghia for Volkswagen in collaboration with Carrozzeria Ghia, an Italian design house, whose often would design updated versions of their Karmann-Ghia in hopes Volkswagen would sign off, even though they never did and the original Ghia kept on as before. But Karmann never stopped trying to get Volkswagen excited about something new, which is why this particular car exist.

Until one day in the 1965, Karmann prepared and built three design study models to be submitted to Volkswagen as a replacement model for the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia and one of them named Karmann-Ghia Concept. As qouted of Conceptcarz, the car designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro while he worked for Ghia. The car built on a slightly wider version chassis than what it's used on the normal Karmann-Ghia. And it's appeared with a lean, sleek and clean bodywork, so made it looks very modern and very striking especially for 1965. Besides that the model has a certain form of precision which later became popular in the 1980s. 
The 1965 Karmann-Ghia Concept is based on the Type 1 platform and is appeared with different sides both in the left-right (some nice brightwork trim, and both a Ghia shield-badge and the KARMANN badge at the rear, it’s pretty elegant and fancy). (Picture from: Flickr)
So it could be said, the model should be born in the next fews decades ahead not in the 1965. It's also a pretty dramatic departure from the look and feel of not just the original Karmann Ghia, but almost any other models that Volkswagen was building at the time. As you can see, some of the curves and round shapes that were so dominating in the original model are now gone, replaced smooth planes with undercuts and angled cutaways that give the car an agile, lith and modern boxy look.

This study design model is also a very interesting demonstration about how flexible VW’s standard platform chassis was for carrying radically different body designs. In our unibody-dominated modern world, this sort of thing is much harder to pull off, but back in the day, VW was basically showed us, they can build pretty much bodies as many they wanted only on one chassis.
The 1965 Karmann-Ghia Concept is based on the Type 1 platform and is appeared with different sides both in the left-right (the finger-hole for the door handle mimics of the shark's gills-like engine cooling air vents). (Picture from: Flickr)
There are several unusual features installed on the study design model, such the turn signal indicators on the dashboard in the form of a lavish, decadent two little green arrows to let you know which way you’re turning, was next to impossible for decades. Then to fill the generously-sized engine bay of this one-off model is a standard VW Type I 1,300 cc 40 hp engine by using an offset air cleaner. While this is a real car, on a real chassis, and even drivable, it’s still just a design study, so you find some interesting details, like these engine air intake vents stickers.

Something else also only can find on this design study model, turn out the left and right sides are not the same. That's intended in order to evaluate two different design ideas for the door handles and side air cooling vents. On the the driver's side with some nice brightwork trim, and both a Ghia shield-badge and the KARMANN badge at the rear, it’s pretty elegant and fancy. The door handle is a minimal button and finger cut-out, very clean and slick.
Meanwhile, on the passenger side, we find a totally different and unique approach, especially the way of the finger-hole for the door handle mimics of the shark's gills-like engine cooling air vents. This is a bit bolder and sportier than the other side. Which side do you like better?

Write your choice in the comments column below this article. If only we have the time machines and go back to the past, so that we can help and give the input to Karmann in choosing the best design in the 1965.😀 *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | JALOPNIK | WIKIPEDIA | MYCARQUEST | CONCEPTCARZ ]
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Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Conciso, another Ferrari weird creation of 80's

After sometime ago we all knew about weird Ferrari car creations of 80's such as Ferrari Mythos, Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani or even from 50s like the classic-one Ferrari Ouvo. Perhaps a Ferrari 328 GTS is simply too standard. If that statement rings true, RM Sotheby's has consigned quite a quirky take on Ferrari's late-'80s sports car. And then....
1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Conciso. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2M0NFuZ)
Might be one of you will ask, is this a Ferrari? Yes, this is a truly one-of-a-kind Ferrari. It's called the Ferrari 328 GTS Conciso, a brainchild of German designer Bernd Michalak. Aside from the radically different shape, the Conciso's body is made entirely from aluminum to shed pounds–it's good for a 30-percent weight reduction, per the consignment. Looking for doors? 
Front view of 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Conciso. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2M0NFuZ)
There aren't any, and the driver has to do their best hop and jump to enter the Conciso. A fixed roof? It's a convertible only. And the windshield? Frameless for driving pleasure, not for safety.
Steering wheel and dashboard view of 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Conciso. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2M0NFuZ)
On the inside, the 328 GTS Conciso is pretty barren with a driver-focused cockpit, save for the fact that the most important gauges, the speedometer and tachometer, are set to the right. But, if the driver wants to see the oil temperature and fuel level, that's directly front and center... for some reason.
Rear side view of 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Conciso. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2M0NFuZ)
The powertrain remains all Ferrari, however, with a 3.2-liter V-8 engine producing around 270 horsepower and a 5-speed manual for shifting duties. At the time, a 328 GTS could crack 0-60 mph in 5.9 seconds, but the time should be slightly better with the Conciso's weight savings.
RM Sotheby hasn't provided an estimated sale price, so it's really anyone's guess as to how much the Conciso will sell for. It's one-of-one, which means someone, somewhere, will likely find it desirable. Or you wanna see another weird car designs in here. *** [EKA (21072019) | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | MOTORAUTHORITY]
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Sunday, April 11, 2021

Ferrari 250 GT N.A.R.T. Spider by Fantuzzi

Throughout the history of the horse prancing logoed car manufacturer in America, seems it cannot be separated from the figure of Luigi 'Coco' Chinetti, Jr. Due to he has an extraordinary understanding of what the American market wants. As in the mid-1960s, while he assumed the spyder design would become the trend in the American market.
1962 Ferrari 250 GT N.A.R.T. Spider by Fantuzzi built based of the 1960 Ferrari 250 Ferrari 250 GTE 2+2 model. (Picture from: Supercars)
Previously, we had discussed about the Ferrari 275 P2 Speciale, a unique American styled sports car created by the design of Giovanni Michelotti under commissioned of Ferrari for Coco Chinetti Jr. based on the Bob Peak-made sketches. The car mentioned above was built on the basis of a spyder race car which made specifically for the Chinetti's racing team, the North American Racing Team (N.A.R.T.)
1962 Ferrari 250 GT N.A.R.T. Spider by Fantuzzi powered by a rebuilding engine according to Testa Rossa's specifications and done on by Alberto Pedretti and Alfredo Caiti. (Picture from: Supercars)
Well, those donor car was what we will discuss on this occasion, and the Ferrari 250 GT N.A.R.T. Spider by Fantuzzi is the car's name. The car began its day as the standard version of the 1960 Ferrari 250 GTE 2+2 model with the chassis number of #2235GT with the bodywork was built by Pininfarina. In the mid-sixties, its Pininfarina bodywork was considered too plain which was later replaced by Coco Chinetti with a new bodywork made by Carrozeria Fantuzzi was inspired the Ferrari's mid-engine sports prototype.

It is known that the car was built before the famous Ferrari 275 GTB variants were born, and was intended as its prototype model. As the result is a more dramatic appearance with an extended front nose and a 275 GTB-like profile car. Many of the race car features borrowed from the 250P such as the Kamm tail at the rear and the integrated roll hoop attached directly behind the interior.
1962 Ferrari 250 GT N.A.R.T. Spider by Fantuzzi has many features borrowed from the 250P such as the Kamm tail at the rear and the integrated roll hoop attached directly behind the interior. (Picture from: Supercars)
Once the aluminum-made bodywork was mounted on the 250 GTE chassis, then installed a rebuilding engine according to Testa Rossa's specifications and done on by former Ferrari technicians who worked for Modenna Motors named Alberto Pedretti and Alfredo Caiti. On those engine, they fitted the Testarossa camshafts, a new intake manifold with six twin-choke Weber carburetors and coupled with a 5-speed manual transmission system.
After completion the car was shown at several major auto show events in America, among others, the 1965 San Francisco Show and the 1966 NY Auto Show. To emphasize his credibility, Chinetti put the North American Racing Team (N.A.R.T.) logo on the back of the car.
After its show duties was over, the car was sold and since then changed owners many times before being owned by someone for more than 33 years. And in 1990, the car returned to the Fantuzzi coachbuilder for a fully restoration process until the mid-1990s. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SUPERCARS | ADRIANFLUX ]
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Friday, April 9, 2021

The streamlined T-bird Mexico concept never been grew up

In a motorized vehicle design process, sometimes it has to be stopped by non-technical matters. This also happened to a beautiful car design made by Alex Tremulis in 1956. At the time, as it is well known that Alex Tremulis' design philosophy had always been to strike a happy marriage between aircraft and automotive styling.
The Ford Thunderbird Mexico concept developed to be the reply to the Chevy's racing Corvettes. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
Because since teenager, he already inherently understood smooth flowing lines would not only look better but would be more efficient at slicing through the air. This might be achieved by him when he spent much of his time during the 2nd World War in the process of designing an aircraft to fly faster than had ever been achieved through the use of wind tunnels.
Alex Tremulis posed alongside the finished Ford Thunderbird Mexico model as it appeared in numerous PR photo shoots. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
This was later applied by him while working at the Ford Motor Company, when the American automotive company was in the midst of developing an equal contender model for the Corvette that was successfully made by Chevrolet, its rival compatriot subsidiary brand of GM. As it is well known, in the time the Chevrolet was already exploring design improvements to their 1956 Corvette that would eventually lead to the 1957 Sebring SS.
The Ford Thunderbird Mexico concept alongside a turbine concept illustrates how low and sleek it appeared compared to its contemporaries. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
By those reasons followed by Ford to develop the concept models through its R&D department. As the result, several car models managed to develop and one of them was the Ford Thunderbird Mexico Concept designed by Alex Tremulis with his automotive design philosophy, later it proven to be able to make the car speeding more than 200 miles per hour.
Another view of the 3/8 scale street scene provides different perspectives when evaluating various designs from all angles. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
In short, Tremulis managed to help Ford made the highly modified supercharged 1956 Thunderbird Mexico to be the answer to the Chevy's racing Corvettes, through the car's design refinement resulting of the large number of model test carried out in the wind tunnel including with the ground effects.

Initially, Mexico was made to race  in La Carrera Panamericana. The idea is that with less horsepower, the Thunderbird chassis can still win by using aerodynamics to gain a top speed advantage over other race cars especially Mercedes.
The 3/8 scale models of La Tosca and Mexico in the Rotunda with the model makers. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
It's a shame Mexico never made it to the full-scale model, plus a series of tragic racing events took place in the mid-50s, leading the Automobile Manufacturers Association placed a ban on the auto manufacturer supports for racing teams.
The Ford Thunderbord Mexico concept with an added-on rounded nose, similar to the late 1960's Chrysler Superbirds. (Picture from: Carstyling.ru)
This brought the development of the Mexico's design stopped, with only a few 3/8 scaled models previously ever been made and used for the wind tunnel experimental data collection process. The sheer size of these 3/8ths scale models made for better data in the wind tunnel than smaller sized models, but they took up a lot of room. It's unknown how many of these models were crushed after their useful days were complete. 

Despite this, the development of many future record-setting race cars and their drivers would benefit directly from the lessons learned by Tremulis a decade earlier. So the efforts weren't all for nothing. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CARSTYLING.RU | ]
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