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Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Had you ever seen these weird-shaped tiny Toyotas of the 2000s?

~MOst Weird~ Toyota in its work in the world of the automotive industry as one of the largest manufacturers in the world, actually has produced many motor vehicles in various types, ranging from small to large ones. Well, among the many vehicles made by The Japanese auto-giant, there are also many unique and strangely shaped motor vehicles which sometimes makes us frown while asking ourselves, 'how can the big-company like Toyota make such strange vehicle?'
This weird shaped car called Toyota WiLL VI was made by Toyota in early of 2000s. (Picture from: UltimateSpecs. Mixed by: Eka)
That thing spontaneous crossed our minds when seen these two unique four-wheeled vehicles of Toyota in the status of Quirky Rides on Twitter some time ago. Uniquely, these two vehicles were made by Toyota in early of 2000s. Initially, we've had thought that the Japanese manufacturer engineers might be experienced déjà vu or even brain cramps when making those vehicles (Ups, sorry).💨 Before you feel more curious about those vehicles, come on let's see below!
The Toyota WiLL VI is built by Toyota in collaboration with several leading Japanese companies in early of 2000s. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
We start with the Toyota WiLL VI which has a design appearance that is no less unique than the legendary German's VW Beetle. It was a car that produced by the Japanese manufacturer in a fairly short time, ranging from 2000 to 2001 in limited quantities and marketed exclusively in Japan only. That's no wonder, if you've never heard about the WiLL VI before.
This Toyota WiLL VI applies a symmetrical design full of converging planes and expressive angles, with distinctive curves along the sides and inverted-angle rear windows that created a silhouette of the horse-drawn carriages of the past. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
Uniquely within the car you would not found a single Toyota logos both on the interior and exterior, because it was the result of an odd joint marketing project between a handful of leading Japanese companies like Asahi Breweries (beer), Panasonic (fax machines, Minidisc players and much more besides), Ezaki Glico (candy), the Kinki Nippon Tourist Company (holiday tours), Kao (air fresheners) and Kokuyo (stationary) and off-course Toyota being the only vehicle manufacturer among them. 
This Toyota WiLL VI was produced with the aim of creating a wide range of WiLL branded products that appeal to the individuality and preferences of the millennial generation as a new generation of consumers . (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
As quoted of Toyota Uk Magazine, this car was produced with the aim of creating a wide range of WiLL branded products that appeal to the individuality and preferences of the millennial generation as a new generation of consumers. And the WiLL VI (pronounced 'vee-eye') is Toyota's opening contribution to this collection and communicates the fun and authentic qualities of the WiLL brand by combining fashionable neo-retro styling with cutting-edge driving performance.
Inside the Toyota WiLL VI, the shifters placed on the steering column, so the automaker doesn't have to bother with the lower center console, allowing for the installation of a bench-style front seat arrangement . (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
For the car's appearance, Toyota applies a symmetrical design full of converging planes and expressive angles, with distinctive curves along the sides and inverted-angle rear windows that created a silhouette officially described as ‘reminiscent of the horse-drawn carriages of the past.' The front and rear were almost identical in appearance and shaped to form a friendly face, while the blistered arches and 15-inch wheels give the design a strong feeling of stability.
This weird shaped Toyota WiLL VI is powered by the supermini’s more powerful 88PS 2NZ-FE 1.3-litre 16v engine, driving the front wheels via a four-speed automatic gearbox. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
As quoted from CarThrottle, the WiLL VI is delivered under the promise of responsive performance underpinned by a platform and powertrain taken directly from the first-generation Toyota Vitz (Yaris), which had just scooped the honour of Japanese Car of the Year at the time. It is powered by the supermini’s more powerful 88PS 2NZ-FE 1.3-litre 16v engine, driving the front wheels via a four-speed automatic gearbox (that's a perfect combination that achieved class-leading fuel economy at the time).
For the sake of practicality in the car's cabin, Toyota has placed shifters on the steering column, so the automaker doesn't have to bother with the lower center console, allowing for the installation of a bench-style front seat arrangement. Meanwhile, the instrument cluster is positioned in the middle of the thick dashboard.

Unfortunately the WiLL VI failed to make much of an impact when it went on sale, so it was produced in less than two years. Eventually Toyota replaced it with the less-odd-looking Toyota WiLL Cypha in early 2002, while also producing a larger Corolla-based VS. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CARTHROTTLE | ULTIMATESPECS | TOYOTA UK MAGAZINE ]
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