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Thursday, August 27, 2020

The weirdest Le Mans racing car

In a racing event that is attended by many motorized vehicle participants from various teams and manufacturers, of course, it will not display a uniform vehicle shape. Yes, various designs made in accordance with the race requirements, of course, will also colorize the excitement of the event.
A unique racing car created by Mario Dalmonte, Carlo Mollino, and Enrico Nardi in 1955 named "Bisiluro Damolnar" for the 24 hours Le Mans racing event. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3hhygDz)
One of the racing events that always features participants with various motor vehicle designs is the 24 hours of Le Mans. This legendary racing event (since 1923), which is held annually at the Circuit de la Sarthe, Le Mans, France, is a venue to compete for the vehicle endurance when it is driven non-stop at high speed for 24 hours around the circuit.
The Bisiluro Damolnar with Carlo Mollino behind the steering wheel while on the speed at the 24 hours Le Mans racing event track in 1955. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3iSP3x8)
Yes, one of the most striking is the appearance of a bright-red open-top Italian racing car that took part in the 24-hour Le Mans of 1955 named Bisiluro Damolnar. Its name derived from the surnames of its three designers, ie Mario Dalmonte, Carlo Mollino, and Enrico Nardi. It looked very different from all the other cars that competed in the legendary endurance competition.
This 1955 Bisiluro Damolnar has a Giannini-tuned twin-cam, 4 cylinders, 737 cc engine mounted on the left-hand side (to counter the weight of the driver, seated on the right). (Picture from: https://bit.ly/34lxlyq)
This racing car which has the appearance like the twin torpedoes which in Italian is called 'Bisiluro,' is an anomaly, it’s asymmetrical, with no passenger seat, and has the engine mounted on the left-hand side (to counter the weight of the driver, seated on the right). And the 450 kg (992 lbs) weighed racing car running by a Giannini-tuned twin-cam, 4 cylinders, 737 cc engine of BMW 750 motorcycle.
The chassis as tested without the body. Note the standard radiator, test fuel tank, Appia suspension and round steering wheel. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/31ycm9J)
Out of context for a moment, the torpedo (siluro) shapes and names seem very popular to use by the Italian' automotive circles in the time. For example, Piaggio, the famous Pontadera-based scooter manufacturer ever made racing scooter species called Vespa Monthléry back in 1950. Shortly after, the real torpedo-shaped design also implemented to its record-breaking scooter known as Vespa Siluro in 1951.
An ovoid steering wheel, designed for maximum legroom, was probably the least weird part of this creation. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3hhygDz)
Back to the car, it is built on a Fiat 500 chassis and frames made of the tubular steel for a lightweight body and attached with an engine with a high (for the time) power to weight ratio, it is said the race car is capable of running up to a top speed of 216 mph (347 kph).
This 1955 Bisiluro Damolnar is built on a Fiat 500 chassis made of tubular steel for a lightweight body and an engine with a high (for the time) power to weight ratio. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/34lxlyq)
But unfortunately, its appearance at one of the most prestigious racing events did not make any achievements. During the race, the Bisiluro was literally blown off the track, after colliding with a close-passing Jaguar D-Type and sustained too much damage to continue the race.
After being repaired and restored, the unusual-shaped racing car now lives on display at the prestigious Leonardo Da Vinci Museum in Milan, Italy. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | SILODROME | STYLEPARK | ROAD AND TRACK | WIRED | VELOCETODAY.COM]
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