Drop Down MenusCSS Drop Down MenuPure CSS Dropdown Menu

CLASSIC

Try with us

Join & Get Updates

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Seeing the Bouffort's unique design vehicles

In the early days of the automotive technology pioneering era around the 1930s to 1940s, engineers were competing to make various inventions related to motor vehicles. Starting from the discovery and development of machines to the design of the vehicle itself.
A streamlined tadpole three-wheeled vehicle was one of the aviation world inspired creations designed by Victor-Albert Bouffort and built by Jamin Meaux. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2C87QVd)
And one of them is like what was done by a French aeronautical engineer named Victor-Albert Bouffort. Well, shortly after World War II was ended when the world's economy stagnated and difficult. But, turned out he managed to design and build some pretty crazy cars.
The Bouffort designed three-wheeler vehicle prototype model was introduced in 1947 and powered by a Citroën Traction Avant 11 CV drivetrain. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3ivld2i)
In the time, he built some kind weird-shaped vehicles that might be made everybody should be turning their head while seen it pass through. The first was the stunning streamlined three-wheeler based on a Citroën Traction-Avant. And there were three of these were actually built and each has slightly different shapes.
And there were three of these were actually built and each has slightly different shapes. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3ivld2i)
In the '50s, he shifted his attention to microcars creating his most famous car, the Peardrop which he felt would revolutionize city transportation. Like most attempts at the time, it didn't catch on, but here's some amazing footage of it driving around London. The way the roof bubble articulates is beautiful.
This Bouffort designed three-wheeler vehicle was exceptionally streamlined with its long mudguards and aerodynamic body featuring gull-wing doors and seating for two side by side. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/3f6P2US)
He tried a few more plastic-bodied microcar designs with fascinating results. None made it to production, so he tried turning a Peugeot 403 into a handsome roadster. It was well-received, but only two examples were built. Interestingly, the front windscreen is actually the rear window of a Studebaker.
The Bouffort Peardrop minicar designed by Victor-Albert Bouffort in 1952. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2Z2tC5F)
His only real success at a vehicle was a dandy. The Valmobile was a scooter that folded into a suitcase-sized package. Around 100,000 were actually built. The unique foldable scooter produced in Japan and sold worldwide, and the 75 lbs machine was kind of an adaptation of folding bikes previously only made for military use.
The Bouffort Enville minicar with a boxy style designed by Victor-Albert Bouffort in 1955 (with the Peardrop model). (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2Z2tC5F)
Bouffort thought an easily stored scooter would be embraced by city-dwellers and he was right. Although I think a lof people bought them for the novelty. No front suspension and a tiny motor and wheels meant they were a little scary to ride. But, you could get a sidecar.
A roadster designed by Victor-Albert Bouffort in 1957. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2ZHUkzz)
Besides the foldable scooter above, Bouffort unique-shaped cars continued, by the launching of the Lohr Fardier, a small utility four-wheel drive vehicle used by the French military in the time. At the time, he had become increasingly aware of traffic congestion in cities such as Paris and decided to do something about it. 
A unique foldable scooter called 'Valmobile' designed by Victor-Albert Bouffort and produced in Japan during the 1960s to 1970s. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2ZHUkzz)
Bouffort and his friend, novelist Henri Viard, observed that most cars only carried one or two passengers. Their idea was to design a small car for city dwellers – two-seat vehicles whose length was no more than the width of a more traditional car.
1970 Lohr Fardier FL 500, a small utility four-wheel drive vehicle designed by Victor-Albert Bouffort for the French military. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2ZHUkzz)
These small cars would be fitted with relatively powerful engines so they could keep up with traffic. The prototype for the “Minima”, as it was called, featured a tubular chassis, composite bodywork, sliding doors, luggage space in the rear, and a 30 hp engine from the Citroën 2CV that helped it reach a top speed of 120 kph (75 mph).
These small cars named 'Minima' designed by Victor-Albert Bouffort and featured a tubular chassis, composite bodywork, sliding doors, luggage space in the rear, and a 30 hp engine from the Citroën 2CV that helped it reach a top speed of 120 kph (75 mph). (Picture from: https://bit.ly/2BzWMQO)
The Minima was introduced to the public in a dazzling display at the 1973 Salon de l’Automobile, with the show car displayed on the 56th floor of Paris’ brand-new Montparnasse Tower. However, it garnered very little interest and plans for its mass production were canceled. The French brilliant engineer Victor-Albert Bouffort died in 1995 at the age of 83. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | OPPOSITELOCK | LANEMOTORMUSEUM | HEMMINGS]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone
Kindly Bookmark and Share it: