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Friday, May 13, 2022

A classic strange cyclops-looked three-wheeler made in Japan

~What Do U Think About IT~ Well on this occasion we will talk about a tiny unique classic vehicle made by a Japanese car maker of the 1950s called Fuji Cabin Model 5A. At first glance, this three-wheeled vehicle has a unique cyclops-like appearance (in modern day might be similar to Mike Wazowski, a main character of the Disney-Pixar's Monsters, Inc. animated series) if we've seen from front.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A three-wheeled vehicle has a unique look similar to a main character in Monsters, Inc. animated series named Mike Wazowski if seen from the front. (Picture from: CarStyling.ru)
The such type of vehicle story began shortly after the country's defeat in World War 2 is believed that was one of the Japan's companies effort to survive. Well, this effort is also what the Diesel Automobile Manufacturing Company done after its car-making division divided into the Hino truck and Isuzu car manufacturing businesses while the aviation division became Hitachi Aviation in March 1946.
This is the Fuji Cabin Model 5A of the 1950s worthy to be crowned as the most unique look three-wheeler ever made by Japanese company. (Picture from: CarStyling.ru)
In that time developing new aviation technology was strictly forbidden by the Allies, as it was considered a war industry. So Hitachi Aviation, as well as other aircraft companies, tried to survive in non-war-related industries. The company subsequently changed its name to the Tokyo Gas and Electric Manufacturing Company in 1952, and began producing 60cc engines for motorbikes and had established itself as an engine producer of mainly small two-stroke engines.
The Fuji Cabin three-wheeled vehicle designed by Ryuichi Tomiya, and appeared for the first time at the 1955 Tokyo Motor Show. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
Then it merged with a Tokyo-based manufacturing company, Fuji Toshuda Motors of Tokyo and started to build their own motorcycles under the names of Fuji Motor and Gasuden FMC, besides supplied engines to other motorcycle makers. As time goes by, the company is decided to produce a kind of scooter with the roof or what we've known later as a micro car.
The Suminoe Flying Feather, an early 350cc kei-car designed by Ryuichi Tomiya for Suminoe Manufacturing back in 1954. (Picture from: Flickr-MrScharroo)
The mentioned micro cars was designed by Ryuichi Tomiya whose before the war had been in charge of body design at Nissan Motors, and afterwards he was responsible for the design of the Suminoe Flying Feather for Suminoe Manufacturing, of which 150 examples were built between 1954 and 1955. His work was highly respected, which later made him known as the 'Leonardo da Vinci of Japan'.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A has a glassfibre bodyshell built on monocoque construction and also equipped with a single headlight, strengthened by a full-length tunnel bringing cooling air directly to the engine. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
And the Tomiya's masterpiece is the Fuji Cabin appeared for the first time at the 1955 Tokyo Motor Show as a streamlined two-seater three-wheeled coupé, and powered by a 122cc single-cylinder Gasuden scooter two-stroke engine with kick start. The unique look vehicle has a glassfibre bodyshell built on monocoque construction and also equipped with a single headlight, strengthened by a full-length tunnel bringing cooling air directly to the engine. 
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A appears to have been designed only to be driven by those of small stature like many of the Japanese at the time, as the car's interior was ludicrously cramped. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
So that when viewed from the front it looks like a creature of Greek mythology, the cyclops. While at rear, there were two rounded beetle-wing lids providing access to the motor and allowing warm air to exit. At first there was a single door on the left, but later cars got one for each side.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A is powered by powered by a 122cc single-cylinder Gasuden scooter two-stroke engine with kick start. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A appears to have been designed only to be driven by those of small stature like many of the Japanese at the time, as the car's interior was ludicrously cramped, with far too much effort required to climb over the central tunnel to get into the staggered driver’s seat.
The Fuji Cabin Model 5A three-wheeled vehicle is a fairly good product with a sturdy construction, but also has a poor quality of bodyshell due to the maker having lack experience working with glassfibre. (Picture from: Below The Radar)
Unlike ordinary cars, the Fuji Cabin is controlled by a set of handlebars positioned close to the driver's seat for comfort, and is equipped with a small but well-engineered transmission system that incorporates a reverse gear; something unusual for a typical Western-scooter engined microcar. At that time Fuji Cabin three-wheeled vehicle was planned to be made as many as 400-500 per month, but in fact only 85 units were made all during its short production period from 1957 to 1958.
In general, the Fuji Cabin Model 5A is a fairly good product with a sturdy construction, but that doesn't mean there are no drawbacks, it's because the makers having lack experience working with glassfibre, so its bodyshell has poor quality. Besides that its sale was not a success partly because considered to be an expensive vehicle and also Fuji had no experience of marketing.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of the two-wheeled monster and stay alive with true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops......*** [EKA [09012015] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | BELOW THE RADAR | CARSTYLING.RU | ROAD&TRACK | FANDOM ]
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