Drop Down MenusCSS Drop Down MenuPure CSS Dropdown Menu

CLASSIC

Try with us

Join & Get Updates

Monday, September 21, 2020

One-off weird-shaped Tasco

When we talk about unique shaped vehicles, it will never end. Why? Because as long as there are enough creative people in this world who keep creating things for various purposes, so long as it is also something unique there will always be. Well, on this occasion we will discuss a unique vehicle that was made in the 1940s and looks very different from most four-wheeled vehicles that existed at that time.
1948 TASCO prototype designed by Gordon Buehrig on display at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/35NM9GE)
Originally, this four-wheeled vehicle was made by The American Sports Car Company and later coined 'TASCO,' which is its acronym. It is designed by a German designer named Gordon Buehrig, inspired by the WWII fighter planes. 

As an automotive designer Gordon Buehrig in his portofolio was the person who responsible for the design work of some of the most popular cars at that time, namely the Auburn, Cord, and Duesenberg  designs, including the stunning coffin-nosed Cord 810/812 and the Auburn 851 Speedster.

From its appearance, this car is clearly inspired by the design of an airplane, where it can be seen on the roof which applies the T-top roof design and the layout of the instrument panel on the dashboard. In particular, the T-top roof design was later patented by the designer in 1951.
1948 TASCO prototype in one of its original outings back in the 1950s. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/35NM9GE)
The car which only made one unit as a prototype can be described as a unique-shaped car with a long hood and a short deck, grand-tourer-like proportions, but then the designer gives a touch of the unique aerospace DNA into the design.

While the interior of this odd-shaped car has 2 seats that can accommodate 2 people in it and has a dashboard design and instrument control panel that is very similar to an airplane. And when you are in the cabin it feels as if you are in the cabin of an airplane.
1948 TASCO prototype  has a dashboard design and instrument control panel that is very similar to an airplane. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/35NM9GE)
As quoted of Motor City Garage, this strange car was done in one ambitious TASCO project but never never progressed beyond this single running prototype by Beuhrig and a handful fellow stylists including Virgil Exner and Bob Bourke while working for Studebaker. 

They hauled the 1939 Mercury from the South Bend junkyard to supply the Tasco chassis and drivetrain. Then built the body at the Derham body workshop in Pennsylvania, which used extensive aluminum construction with fiberglass front wheel covers with one of the unique features is the pair of plexiglass roof panels that can be lifted, which we now refer to as T-Tops. 
Right front view of 1948 TASCO prototype designed by Gordon Buehrig on display at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/35NM9GE)
Well, the T-Top roof design which later became famous in the 1960s when GM applied the roof design to its 1968 Corvette models. This then made those American manufacturer sued by Buehrig for using it on its model. Unfortunately, he was paid very little for his patent and it became almost a trademark for Corvettes.
Fully detailed 1948 Tasco quarter-scale model at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum. (Picture from: https://bit.ly/35NM9GE)
Quoting from the same source, indeed the Tasco prototype looked strange in terms of aesthetics at the time, on which directly also acknowledged by the designer by calling his awkward car 'my Edsel.' 
Now this prototype evetually found its way into the possesion of Nevada car collector Richie Clyne, who later donated it to the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum. While the car cannot be called a success in any real sense, it doesn't make it any less attractive, and it makes a great addition to the collection. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | THE RICHEST | AUTOBLOG | MACS MOTOR CITY GARAGE]
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone
Kindly Bookmark and Share it: