Drop Down MenusCSS Drop Down MenuPure CSS Dropdown Menu

MERDEKA

Try with us

Join & Get Updates

Monday, August 27, 2018

Researchers develop new naturally decompose plastic materials

The use of plastic as packaging material continues to increase along with the increasing number of world population. Environmental experts say packaging materials that can be composted and can be decomposed naturally are now increasingly needed, especially the ingredients used as food packaging.
Carson Meredith, Professor at Georgia Tech's School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, showed a new type of "plastic" that could be decomposed which he was developing with other researchers. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2Lj0vkz)
Now, a thin layer like plastic that can be decomposed and made of shells and wood scraps might be able to meet that need. The "plastic" is a new type, which is not made of oil at all, and is currently being developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Research leader Carson Meredith was looking for alternatives to plastic materials made from by-products of oil refining. "About eight years ago, we began conducting research in what is known as nano technology by using forest products," he told VOA.

"This is a new field of science that seeks the use of wood or other forest products, to take parts called nano crystal materials to be made into cellulose and use them in the manufacture of very lightweight but strong packaging materials." That means, cellulose fibers found in wood used to make paper can also be used to replace plastic as food packaging. 
This is J. Carson Meredith, a professor in Georgia Tech's School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. (Picture from: https://b.gatech.edu/2MMY9PE)
The Meredith leadership team combined wood cellulose with chitin, the basic ingredient of seashells and lobster or crayfish skeletons, and the result was a thin layer that could naturally decompose. At the molecular level, electrically charged chitin and cellulose are mutually attractive. Experts at the Georgia Technology Institute use this natural fact to make thin layers like plastic.

Meredith said the results of his research showed that chitin and cellulose could become stronger if formed in two or three thin layers. This new packaging material is very effective to prevent oxygen from entering, and therefore is very good for wrapping food.
Meredith said that he had not tested the new "plastic" as a food wrapper, but the interesting thing was that it could be a packaging material that could be used as a compost and was fully biodegradable or would be completely broken down after being dumped in the trash. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH HORIZONS]  
Note: This blog  can be accessed via your smart phone
Kindly Bookmark and Share it: