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Sunday, September 23, 2018

Randy Smith's "Magnum" OHV/Sidevalve V-Twin

Forgive me, I couldn't help but throw at least one chopper in here at the Harley-Davidson Museum. A masterful mechanical design engineer, some have called Randy Smith the Godfather of Custom Cycles Engineering Co.
Randy Smith’s "Magnum" OHV/Sidevalve V-Twin at the Harley-Davidson Museum. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2NXYLSY)
Smith delighted in creating custom parts for factory bikes and crafting "cut-downs, bobbers and choppers," custom motorcycles that delivered unique performance capabilities, which were often achieved through combinations of unlikely parts. Such is the case with Randy’s "Magnum."

The Magnum's engine features an unlikely marriage between a 45-cubic inch 1941 WR Flathead bottom end and a newer (at the time) 55-cubic inch overhead valve Ironhead top end. This bike was Randy's unique response to the age-old engineering challenge of acceleration – how to increase horsepower in a lightweight machine.
Randy Smith and his team posed with his "Magnum" OHV/Sidevalve V-Twin. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MRrjJk)
At the time the Magnum was conceived, the Sportster model was popular among racers, and Randy wanted to engineer a bike that was lighter and faster, as well as rugged and reliable enough to be safe and street legal.

Several modifications and tests later, the end result was a bike that weighed less than 320 lbs Harley says (Smith claimed 203 lbs) and hit 106 mph in a quarter-mile drag.
Randy Smith posed while lifted his "Magnum" OHV/Sidevalve V-Twin. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/2MRrjJk)
I highly doubt the entire bike weighed 203 lbs, but I like Randy’s optimism and hey, 106 in the quarter-mile using a mish-mash of 1940s and ‘50s engine parts ain't bad.

Other modifications included changes to the bike’s transmission, frame, suspension and brakes, including the addition of a Ceriani racing fork and brakes. And just for fun, he converted a welding mask into a windshield.

Kept spur your adrenaline on the power of two-wheeled monster and stay alive with the true safety riding. May God will forgive Your sins and so does the cops...... *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CUSTOM CYCLES ENGINEERING | GREASY KULTURE | MOTORCYCLE.COM]
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