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Showing posts with label Unique. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Unique. Show all posts

Friday, November 19, 2021

The XP-300 being one of the 1950s Buick dream cars

~Ur Dream Car~ Before leaving Buick in 1951 to move up the General Motors ladder, Charles A. Chayne had approved the Buick XP-300 project and made it as the GM LeSabre's companion dream car, while its name reflects the fact that it was an experimental vehicle with its drivetrain can be spewed power over 300 horsepower.
1951 Buick XP-300 Concept car features a wraparound windshield, three tailfins, and a grille that resembles an electric razor and also includes push-button power windows and seats. (Picture from: OldCarsWeekly)
Besides Charles A. Chayne, in the process of creating the Buick XP-300 concept car (previously labeled as XP-9) also involved other famous figure in the automotive world such as Ned F. Nickles and Harley J. Earl. As we all knew, Charles Chayne have worked together with Harley Earl since the creation of the first future concept car called the Buick Y-Job more than a decade earlier.
1951 Buick XP-300 Concept car (on right-side) shared many common mechanical components with the GM LeSabre Concept (on left-side), including its three tailfins and a 335 horsepower V8 engine, which can run on gasoline or methanol. (Picture from: MacMotorCityGarage)
Off course, if seen from the car appearance, it was really inspired by the heyday of the jet era of the 1950s. In addition, it's known the concept shared many common mechanical components with the LeSabre, including its 335 horsepower V8 engine, which can run on gasoline or methanol.
1951 Buick XP 300 Concept sat on display in the Buick collection at the Sloan Museum, Flint, Michigan. (Picture from: Wikipedia)
Despite its somewhat similar appearance to the LeSabre, the XP-300's styling feels cleaner than the more futuristic and rocket-inspired lines of its counterpart. Furthermore, although the LeSabre generally reflects Earl's design philosophy, the XP-300 fits more closely with Chayne's conception of the future of Buick production cars, and its front end design ultimately reflects the 1954 Buick line.

Overall, both of concepts (Y-Job and XP-300) are pretty much the same; and XP-300 was a 1950s dream car that is an interpretation of modern vehicles based on design sketches by Ned F. Nickles, an extraordinary talent self-taught designer.
The interior of the Buick XP-300 Concept features pleated blue-leather bucket seats with adjustable inflatable air bladders and a center console. (Picture from: WikiWand)
Meanwhile the XP-300 has aluminum body panels that reduced the overall weight of the car to 3,100 lbs. This was important, because the body and frame structure were welded as a solid unit and the many push-button power accessories (including the rear convertible window) were heavy and added extra pounds.
The Buick XP-300 Concept features with a striking side trim that would look like a home on the fictional Buck Rogers' interplanetary cruiser. (Picture from: AmazingClassicCars)
And according to OldCarsWeekly, its beauty and innovation went beneath its aluminum skin. Four hydraulic jacks were hidden under the body work and elevated either the driver or passenger side of the car. Upon shutting the doors, steel bars hydraulically slid out so that the car was more rigid, as these bars completed the rollcage-like framework within the body.
The Buick XP-300 Concept's beauty and innovation went beneath its aluminum skin, features also with four hydraulic jacks were hidden under the body work and elevated either the driver or passenger side of the car. (Picture from: AmazingClassicCars)
The XP-300 convertible concept car has the appearance looks like partially of sports car and spaceship sized 16-ft  that glides just 6-1/2 inches above the ground. This car features an "electric shaver" grille, a wraparound windshield, a three-fin tail with an electric radio antenna protruding from the center fin and striking side trim that would look like a home on the fictional Buck Rogers' interplanetary cruiser. It even has push-button seats and windows!
The Buick XP-300 Concept also features with a three-fin tail with an electric radio antenna protruding from the center fin. (Picture from: AmazingClassicCars)
The interior of the XP-300 features pleated blue-leather bucket seats with adjustable inflatable air bladders and a center console. The car also has a telescoping steering wheel and an instrument panel displaying a prominently mounted combined speedometer/tachometer as well as a fuel gauge. It also boasted numerous technologies considered safety features in 1951, including its dual brakes, adjustable seats, and adjustable steering wheel in addition to seat belts.
The XP-300 was displayed at auto shows across the United States, where it became a popular fixture with attendees as well as the press. The XP-300 accumulated nearly 10,400 miles (16,700 km) of driving, although it did not drive as far as the more publicized LeSabre. In 1966, the XP-300 was refurbished and donated to the Alfred P. Sloan Museum in Flint, Michigan.
In 1985, it was sit on display at the Sloan Museum alongside the Buick Centurion, Buick Wildcat II, Buick Y-Job, Cadillac Cyclone, and General Motors Le Sabre. In 1991, it was exhibited at the Museum of Transportation in Brookline, Massachusetts, along with four other GM cars. As of 2018, it is still at the Sloan Museum, where it is one of five Buick concept cars on display and was also insured for $1 million. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | WIKIPEDIA | WIKIWAND | OLDCARSWEEKLY | AMAZINGCLASSICCARS | MACMOTORCITY GARAGE ]
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Thursday, November 18, 2021

Here's a lonesome beauty Zeder Z-250

We are interested to know more while seeing this fairly beautiful car shaped on the Pinterest pages. Besides having a beautiful shape, it turns out that its unusual name factor also sparked the desire to get to know the figure of this car more closely. After surfing and searching in the internet, finally we're knew that the car's name comes from the name of the person who designed it, Frederick Zeder Jr.
1953 Zeder Storm Z-250 concept car by Frederick Zeder Jr. and bodywork by Bertone. (Picture from: OldConceptCars)
 Who is he? He is the son of Frederick Zeder who is known as one of the Three Musketeers of Chrysler's engineering team, or the early engineering team that had an important role in the early days of the American car manufacturer previously known as Studebaker.

Like Carol Shelby, the young Zeder had matured in the automotive racing world before serious getting involved into the car design, he was also obsessed with creating a sports car that could become a serious competitor to Jaguar and Ferrari cars both on the racing track and streets.

What's the idea? As quoted from DriveTribe, his dream car is a dual purpose sports car only with just a simple switch on the car's body can be converted from racing use and street use. So then was born the Zeder Storm Z-250.
1953 Zeder Storm Z-250 concept car while on display at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. (Picture from: ReddIt)
It turns out that in the making of this beautiful car also involved the famous Italian coachbuilder Bertone, it's not surprising if the car was known as one of numerous Bertone's designs in the 1950s. Besides that, there are also many people who know it as the Dodge Storm Z-250, due to the concept car uses the Dodge's mechanical elements.
1953 Zeder Storm Z-250 concept car interior featured with a brown colored steering wheel, the same nuanced dashboard that consisted by several sporty instruments panels and two genuine-leather covered bucket seats. (Picture from: MyCarQuest)
In fact the car was designed independently by Fred Zeder Jr. along with the great engineers at that time such as Carl Breer, Gene Cassaroll, Hank Kean and John Butterfield to be proposed as a Chrysler's grand coupé. After completing the design then Zeder Jr. commissioned the Italian master craftsmen Bertone to build the car bodywork. And the result is a beautiful American sports car with a touch of an Italian flare.
1953 Zeder Storm Z-250 concept car uses a Dodge HEMI V8 engine which is capable of producing 260bhp of power and making acceleration performance from 0 to 60 in just 7.5 seconds. (Picture from: Roeteveechie.org)
The model reflects the Bertone style of the period, with particular attention to the lines and design of the American car, especially with regards to the long streamlined front bonnet, smooth wings and imposing horizontal radiator grille.

The car built on a rigid tube frame chassis it was intended to be a dual-purpose sports and racing car. When raced the comfortable touring body currently fitted could be removed by unscrewing four bolts and replaced with an ultra light 150 pound fiberglass body.

As the driving force, the Storm Z-250 uses a Dodge HEMI V8 engine which is capable of producing 260bhp of power and making acceleration performance from 0 to 60 in just 7.5 seconds. Meanwhile the car's other components such as brakes, suspension and steering rack are also taken from some other Chrysler vehicles.
If the Zeder Storm Z-250 would have gone into production it would have competed with the Ford Thunderbird, Chevrolet Corvette and the Kaiser Darrin. (Picture from: OldConceptCars)
It is said that this car was originally planned with a 2 + 2 composition, but when the bodywork was to be built the Italian coachbuilder, a Bertone designer suggested to Zeder Jr. to turn it into a 2 seater sports car. He was interested to try it and then the 2-seat sportscar Z-250 was realized with satisfying results. The car had run some testings on the famous Fiat roof test track in Turin, and was also presented at the 1953 Turin Auto Show to a great reception
.

Zeder Jr. was delighted by the enthusiastic reception of the Italian audience for his car, then he brought it back to the US to offer it to Chrysler in the hopes that the American manufacturer would be interested in producing the car.
However, after arriving in the US, it turned out that Chrysler refused because the Storm Z-250 was considered too expensive and not profitable for the company. Though Zeder Jr. could have offered his car to others, but he wasn't do that due to the Chevrolet Corvette and Ford Thunderbird had made debuts. So he gave up on his dream of producing the dual purpose racer and put the only-one built concept car into his garage.😢

After being rejected by Chrysler, this car was seen several times on display at various institutions and events. In fact, with such exquisite style and potential, it's sad that the car was never produced. In our opinion, this car actually deserves to be a serious competitor for the Corvette, Thunderbird, Jaguar, even Ferrari at the time.😒 *** [EKA [02122020] | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | JALOPNIK | OLDCONCEPTCARS | DRIVETRIBE
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Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Had you ever seen these weird-shaped tiny Toyotas of the 2000s?

~MOst Weird~ Toyota in its work in the world of the automotive industry as one of the largest manufacturers in the world, actually has produced many motor vehicles in various types, ranging from small to large ones. Well, among the many vehicles made by The Japanese auto-giant, there are also many unique and strangely shaped motor vehicles which sometimes makes us frown while asking ourselves, 'how can the big-company like Toyota make such strange vehicle?'
This weird shaped car called Toyota WiLL VI was made by Toyota in early of 2000s. (Picture from: UltimateSpecs. Mixed by: Eka)
That thing spontaneous crossed our minds when seen these two unique four-wheeled vehicles of Toyota in the status of Quirky Rides on Twitter some time ago. Uniquely, these two vehicles were made by Toyota in early of 2000s. Initially, we've had thought that the Japanese manufacturer engineers might be experienced déjà vu or even brain cramps when making those vehicles (Ups, sorry).💨 Before you feel more curious about those vehicles, come on let's see below!
The Toyota WiLL VI is built by Toyota in collaboration with several leading Japanese companies in early of 2000s. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
We start with the Toyota WiLL VI which has a design appearance that is no less unique than the legendary German's VW Beetle. It was a car that produced by the Japanese manufacturer in a fairly short time, ranging from 2000 to 2001 in limited quantities and marketed exclusively in Japan only. That's no wonder, if you've never heard about the WiLL VI before.
This Toyota WiLL VI applies a symmetrical design full of converging planes and expressive angles, with distinctive curves along the sides and inverted-angle rear windows that created a silhouette of the horse-drawn carriages of the past. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
Uniquely within the car you would not found a single Toyota logos both on the interior and exterior, because it was the result of an odd joint marketing project between a handful of leading Japanese companies like Asahi Breweries (beer), Panasonic (fax machines, Minidisc players and much more besides), Ezaki Glico (candy), the Kinki Nippon Tourist Company (holiday tours), Kao (air fresheners) and Kokuyo (stationary) and off-course Toyota being the only vehicle manufacturer among them. 
This Toyota WiLL VI was produced with the aim of creating a wide range of WiLL branded products that appeal to the individuality and preferences of the millennial generation as a new generation of consumers . (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
As quoted of Toyota Uk Magazine, this car was produced with the aim of creating a wide range of WiLL branded products that appeal to the individuality and preferences of the millennial generation as a new generation of consumers. And the WiLL VI (pronounced 'vee-eye') is Toyota's opening contribution to this collection and communicates the fun and authentic qualities of the WiLL brand by combining fashionable neo-retro styling with cutting-edge driving performance.
Inside the Toyota WiLL VI, the shifters placed on the steering column, so the automaker doesn't have to bother with the lower center console, allowing for the installation of a bench-style front seat arrangement . (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
For the car's appearance, Toyota applies a symmetrical design full of converging planes and expressive angles, with distinctive curves along the sides and inverted-angle rear windows that created a silhouette officially described as ‘reminiscent of the horse-drawn carriages of the past.' The front and rear were almost identical in appearance and shaped to form a friendly face, while the blistered arches and 15-inch wheels give the design a strong feeling of stability.
This weird shaped Toyota WiLL VI is powered by the supermini’s more powerful 88PS 2NZ-FE 1.3-litre 16v engine, driving the front wheels via a four-speed automatic gearbox. (Picture from: Toyota UK Magazine)
As quoted from CarThrottle, the WiLL VI is delivered under the promise of responsive performance underpinned by a platform and powertrain taken directly from the first-generation Toyota Vitz (Yaris), which had just scooped the honour of Japanese Car of the Year at the time. It is powered by the supermini’s more powerful 88PS 2NZ-FE 1.3-litre 16v engine, driving the front wheels via a four-speed automatic gearbox (that's a perfect combination that achieved class-leading fuel economy at the time).
For the sake of practicality in the car's cabin, Toyota has placed shifters on the steering column, so the automaker doesn't have to bother with the lower center console, allowing for the installation of a bench-style front seat arrangement. Meanwhile, the instrument cluster is positioned in the middle of the thick dashboard.

Unfortunately the WiLL VI failed to make much of an impact when it went on sale, so it was produced in less than two years. Eventually Toyota replaced it with the less-odd-looking Toyota WiLL Cypha in early 2002, while also producing a larger Corolla-based VS. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CARTHROTTLE | ULTIMATESPECS | TOYOTA UK MAGAZINE ]
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Monday, November 15, 2021

The Ferrari's new Icona Series is ready to reveal in November 2021

~New Bred~ It's no secret that Ferrari is preparing a new supercar as part of its Icona Series, as the special name was intended to set up for a special limited production project aimed for the potential customers and  collectors with a special style inspired by the Ferrari's historic models.
This legendary Ferrari 330 P4 racing car is said to give an inspiration to the Ferrari's new Icona Series would be launched on November 2021. (Picture from: UltimateHotWheel.boards.net)
As we could seen on earlier of 2018, the Maranello-based automaker unveiled the first Icona Series cars called the Ferrari Monza SP1 and SP2 is a pair of speedsteers that pays homage to the two Ferrari's most iconic race cars of the 1950s such as the Ferrari 750 Monza and 860 Monza.
The Ferrari Monza SP1 (right) and SP2 (left) is launched back in 2018 and known as the first Icona Series car. (Picture from: Ferrari)
A quoted of the Carbuzz, rumors have spread if the next Ferrari's Icona Series project will reportedly be inspired by the Ferrari 330 P4, which finished second at the 24 Hours of LeMans in 1967. And the Ferrari's new Icona Series will be revealed in November, even the Ferrari's new retro supercar prototype included in the Icona Series has been spotted several times.
The Ferrari's new retro supercar prototype included in the Icona Series caught on the spy shot. (Picture from: Carbuzz)
Currently, the leaked media invite confirmed when it would debut. Ahead of its debut, invitations have been sent to trusted clients to see the new Ferrari Icona supercar at a private event somewhere in Italy on November 15.
There's a photo shared on Instagram shows one of the invitations being sent to one of the Ferrari Monza owners. In a nice touch, the presentation box includes a chrome-plated shifter. (Picture from: Modifikasi)
Then the car will be presented to the public one week later, precisely on November 21. Finally, Ferrari CEO, Benedetto Vigna confirmed that the Ferrari's new Icona Series car will be revealed this month as the successor to the Monza SP1 and SP2.
The invitation letter has been sent to trusted clients to see the new Ferrari Icona supercar at a private event somewhere in Italy on November 15. (Picture from: Modifikasi)
Interestingly, Ferrari's second Icona Series car was originally set to launch in 2022, but the Ferrari's Chief Financial Officer, Antonio Picca Piccon said the launch was brought forward because of "strong customer needs for the new Icona, which we feel a responsibility to fulfill."
Piccon also added that the deposit for the new Icona will be picked up in 2022. And for now on, we could be only wait and see.😀 *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CARBUZZ | MOTORAUTHORITY ]
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This was the 240Z's potential rival made by the Australian automaker

~Ready to Fly~ Australia, a country which is located in the southernmost part of the planet Earth, turn out also has a long history in the world's automotive, although now the country's automotive industry is almost no longer seem vibes like before. Despite that, as we all know, the land of kangaroos once had Holden, an automotive brand that was quite well known throughout the world.
If the Holden Torana GTR-X could be entered into production line back in the 1970s, it would be a potential rival to the Datsun 240Z. (Picture form: ClassicDriver)
As quoted of Manofmany, the Australian automotive company stopped all local production in 2017. These days, the brand imports its vehicles from plants in Germany, Canada, and the USA. Nevertheless, models like the Holden Commodore (which delivers reliable performance at an affordable price) remain the stuff of legend.
The Holden Torana GTR-X concept is built in 1970 based on the relatively traditional Torana GTR XU-1 coupé. (Picture form: ClassicDriver)
Besides that, this Australian manufacturer also had a mid-sized car called the Holden Torana (the name comes from an Aboriginal word meaning "to fly") which was produced between 1967 and 1980. Throughout the 1960s to 1970s the reverberation of sports cars trend seemed to have succeeded in influencing the interest of this Australian manufacturer to develop the sports cars.
The Holden Torana GTR-X concept designed with a pointed nose, steeply raked windscreen and pop-up headlights also fitted with advance technology at the time such 4-wheel vacuum assisted disc brakes, retractable seat belts, foam filled fuel tank and electric windows. (Picture form: ClassicDriver)
In short, then Holden Torana GTR-X concept car was born, initially, was seriously considered for production in the early 1970s. The concept car is built based on the relatively traditional Torana GTR XU-1 coupé, the concept was not only given a ground-up redesign using in-vogue features (a pointed nose, steeply raked windscreen and pop-up headlights), but also featured with advance technology at the time.
The Holden Torana GTR-X concept has the long-grain black vinyl wrapped interior to complete two cozy racing-style seats, a three-spoke steering wheel and also a dashboard full of gauges and buttons. (Picture form: ClassicDriver)
As qouted of Wikipedia, the GTR-X had a fibreglass body appeared into a wedge-shaped 1970s typical styles including a hatchback rear access, and the prototype cars had LC Torana GTR XU-1 mechanical components.
The Holden Torana GTR-X concept is powered by a 3.05-litre Torana GTR XU-1 straight six engine. (Picture form: CarStyling.ru)
The GTR-X looks similar to the iconic sports cars of the 1970s, such as the Maserati Khamsin, Ferrari 308 GT4, Lotus Esprit, and Mazda RX-7, and according to the automaker the 1,043 kg weighted sports car concept capable to run up to a top speed of 210 kph.
The Holden Torana GTR-X concept had a fibreglass body appeared into a wedge-shaped 1970s typical styles including a hatchback rear access. (Picture form: ClassicDriver)
Besides having a beautiful and simple body made of fiberglass, and this is the first car made by Holden to be fitted with four-wheel disc brakes. However, unlike the previous Hurricane concept car also made by this Australian manufacturer, the GTR-X concept is still potentially feasible for production.
The Australian automaker making a lot of promotional materials during the development time of the Holden Torana GTR-X concept to attarct potential customers. (Picture form: ClassicDriver)
At that time Holden made three prototypes and seemed serious enough to work on the project by making a lot of promotional materials to attract potential customers if the car was produced. However, in the end, the domestic market was deemed too small to cover all the expenses associated with the car's production process.
If it was produced, the shapely Australian-made sports car might have made quite a rival for the likes of the Datsun 240Z. Today, one of the Torana GTR-X sports car can be found at the Holden's headquarter in Melbourne,  while another two prototypes were destroyed.😞 Wanna see the Holden retro magic touch named the 'EFIJY Concept' *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | CLASSICDRIVER | WIKIPEDIA | MANOFMANY | CARSTYLING.RU ]
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Sunday, November 14, 2021

A Fiat Barchetta derivative custom car specially dedicated to Giovanni Agnelli

~Never Seen It~ After some time ago we have discussed a concept car named the Fiat Scia Concept which is the forerunner of today's Fiat Barchetta. And on this occasion, we will discuss another concept car that is no less beautiful than the Scia Concept earlier.
1996 Fiat Dedica Prototipo (in pictured: sat on display at the 2017 Salon Automotoretro Torino) was dedicated to the former Fiat President Giovanni Agnelli. (Picture from: Flickr)
This beautiful roofless car is one-off prototype built by Gruppo Stola named the Fiat Dedica (an Italian word mean 'Dedication') based of Aldo Brovarone's designwork back in 1996. The designer is a retired designer who used to work with Pininfarina until 1988 and a good friend of Alfredo Stola, managing director of Gruppo Stola.
1996 Fiat Dedica Prototipo built by a Turin based company Stola based of Aldo Brovarone's designwork. (Picture from:
ClassicDriver
)
Gruppo Stola was a Turin-based company founded in 1919. At the beginning, its core business was concentrated on style models and concept cars for the main manufacturers. Related to the car concept, beside known as the first ever prototype made by Stola under its own brand, the Dedica name comes from the fact that the car was dedicated to the former Fiat President Giovanni Agnelli.
The Fiat Dedica Prototipo project was the first in a series of about twenty prototypes made by Stola from 1996 to 2006. (Picture from: Pinterest)
The Dedica roffless car was built on the basis of the Fiat Barchetta known as one of the legendary spyders of the nineties and features a souped up 2 liter engine from the Coupé Fiat 16V Turbo. This engine capable to spew power up to 262 bhp, which gives the 1,020 kg car a topspeed of 270 kph and an accelaration from zero to 100 kph in 5.8 seconds.
1996 Fiat Dedica Prototipo's interior is slightly changed when compared to its donor, where the center console is removed, and there are no switches for windows or ventilation. (Picture from: Carsthatnevermadeitetc)
When compared to its donor car, the interior is slightly changed, where the center console is removed, and there are no switches for windows or ventilation. This is not surprising as the window is cut to 20 cm so that it cannot be lowered while the two air vents are replaced by additional dials. The steeringwheel, pedals and turqoise leather seats are by Momo.
The Fiat Dedica Prototipo project is powered by 2 liter engine from the Coupé Fiat 16V Turbo and capable to spew power up to 262 bhp, which gives the car a topspeed of 270 kph and an accelaration 0-100 kph in 5.8 seconds. (Picture from: Pinterest)
As for the legs, such the six-spoke rims made by Tecnomagnesio wrapped in the Goodyear Eagle F1 tires, and equipped with the Brembo's 4 airvented brakes which are ready to provide a capable speed deacceleration. (Sorry if the video below doesn't talk about the Fiat Stola Dedica Prototipo).
Uniquely, not only was the aim to produce a 1950's sportscar, but also made using no prepressed sheetmetal but only cardboard templates were used for direct modelling the bodywork, making the car 16 cms wider than its donor.

A nice tough is the top of the dashboard which features the bodycolor of the car: a concept that was used for the prototype barchetta, but didn't make it into the final product! There are no plans for production of any kind. The car is registered with Italian plate and papers and it is road legal. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | FIATBARCHETTA | CLASSICDRIVER | CARROZZIERI-ITAIANI  ]
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