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Monday, May 5, 2014

Study find "Young blood" reduce the Effects of aging...

A recent study in the United States get the older mice become more powerful, and can move longer, with better mental attitude, when they gets a blood transfusion or substance substantially from the younger mice.

If this research continues as expected, the researchers hope one day there will be a cure for some disease that occurs in the older people. "(However), do not try (this research) at home," said Saul Villeda of the University of California, San Francisco, the author of one of the three research that released at the site of the Nature Medicine and Science journal on Sunday, May 4, 2014.
Blood cells illustration. (Picture from: http://bit.ly/1j0mGe4)
Villeda examined mice that is equivalent to a human age of 20s and 60s. Researchers repeatedly injecting old mice with blood from the younger mice or another age. As a result, the old rats by injection of young blood looks better in the activity and memory test than the mice that received the blood injection from the same age mice.

For example, old mice receiving injections of blood from young mice can remember well where the location of the submerged area of ​​the maze that is used as a memory test. Villeda said the researchers are still figuring out what component in the "young blood" that gave rise to these impacts.

Two other research from Harvard University research focuses on the existence of abundant substance in the blood of young mice. These substances are known as GDF11 protein, a compound which is also found in human blood. "Concentration (of this substance) decreases with age," said Amy Wagers, one of the authors of the two papers.

Average old mice receiving injections of this substance showed greater grip strength and has a longer durability grip on a treadmill than mice that did not receive injections of the protein.

The Harvard researchers also get that old mice receiving injections of blood from younger mice had more vessels and blood flow in the brain. Injections of GDF11 give the same effect.

Lee Rubin, author of the new research at Harvard University, said the results of this study need further work to find ways of treatment of age-related mental decline and dementia alias decline in organ function that tends to occur with aging in humans.

Wagers and Villeda said could not be ascertained GDF11 an explanation of the impact of research recorded Villeda. Wagers suspect there are other substances in the blood that help tackle aging in animals. *** [EKA | FROM VARIOUS SOURCES | THE SEATLE TIMES]
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